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1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding="UTF-8"?>
2
3 <!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
4 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/bluetooth-guide.xml,v 1.4 2005/09/07 00:27:46 yoswink Exp $ -->
5
6 <guide link="/doc/en/bluetooth-guide.xml">
7 <title>Gentoo Linux Bluetooth Guide</title>
8
9 <author title="Author">
10 <mail link="deathwing00@gentoo.org">Ioannis Aslanidis</mail>
11 </author>
12 <author title="Contributor">
13 <mail link="puggy@gentoo.org">Douglas Russell</mail>
14 </author>
15 <author title="Contributor">
16 <mail link="marcel@holtmann.org">Marcel Holtmann</mail>
17 </author>
18 <author title="Author">
19 <mail link="fox2mike@gentoo.org">Shyam Mani</mail>
20 </author>
21 <author title="Editor">
22 <mail link="rane@gentoo.org">Ɓukasz Damentko</mail>
23 </author>
24
25 <abstract>
26 This guide will explain how to successfully install a host Bluetooth device,
27 configure the kernel properly, explain all the possibilities that the Bluetooth
28 interconnection offers and how to have some fun with Bluetooth.
29 </abstract>
30
31 <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
32 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
33 <license/>
34
35 <version>1.2</version>
36 <date>2006-01-05</date>
37
38 <chapter id="introduction">
39 <title>Introduction</title>
40 <section>
41 <title>What is Bluetooth?</title>
42 <body>
43
44 <p>
45 Bluetooth is an industrial specification that provides users a way to connect
46 and exchange information between devices like personal computers, PDAs or
47 mobile phones. Using the Bluetooth technology, users can achieve wireless voice
48 and data transmission between devices at a low cost. Bluetooth also offers the
49 possibility to create small wireless LANs and to synchronize devices.
50 </p>
51
52 </body>
53 </section>
54 <section>
55 <title>About the content of this guide</title>
56 <body>
57
58 <p>
59 The first part of this guide is to identify qualified and non-qualified devices
60 that support the Bluetooth technology. This way, users can purchase Bluetooth
61 devices that are known to work. After that, the guide explains how to configure
62 the system kernel, identify the Bluetooth devices installed on the system and
63 detected by the kernel and install the necessary basic Bluetooth tools.
64 </p>
65
66 <p>
67 The second part covers how to detect remote devices and how to establish a
68 connection from or to them by either setting up radio frequency communication
69 (RFCOMM) or by setting up a personal area network (PAN).
70 </p>
71
72 <p>
73 The last part of the guide lists in detail applications that can take
74 advantage of all the possibilities offered by the Bluetooth technology.
75 </p>
76
77 </body>
78 </section>
79 </chapter>
80
81 <chapter id="devices">
82 <title>Supported Devices</title>
83 <section>
84 <title>Qualified and non-qualified devices that support Bluetooth</title>
85 <body>
86
87 <impo>
88 These products might work even though some are not qualified Bluetooth
89 products. Gentoo does not support them in any way, they might just work.
90 </impo>
91
92 <p>
93 A list of the currently supported devices can be found at: <uri
94 link="http://www.holtmann.org/linux/bluetooth/features.html">Bluetooth device
95 features and revision information by Marcel Holtmann</uri>.
96 </p>
97
98 </body>
99 </section>
100 </chapter>
101
102 <chapter id="kernel">
103 <title>Configuring the system</title>
104 <section>
105 <title>Kernel Configuration</title>
106 <body>
107
108 <p>
109 As the latest Linux stable kernel is 2.6, the configuration will be done for
110 these series of the kernel. Most Bluetooth devices are connected to a USB port,
111 so USB will be enabled too. If you want, you can use hotplugging in case you
112 want to use modules instead of compiling support built into the kernel. Please,
113 refer to the <uri link="/doc/en/usb-guide.xml"> Gentoo Linux USB Guide</uri>.
114 </p>
115
116 <pre caption="Configuration for 2.6 kernels">
117 Networking ---&gt;
118
119 &lt;*&gt; Bluetooth subsystem support ---&gt;
120
121 --- Bluetooth subsystem support
122 &lt;M&gt; L2CAP protocol support
123 &lt;M&gt; SCO links support
124 &lt;M&gt; RFCOMM protocol support
125 [*] RFCOMM TTY support
126 &lt;M&gt; BNEP protocol support
127 [*] Multicast filter support
128 [*] Protocol filter support
129 &lt;M&gt; HIDP protocol support
130
131 Bluetooth device drivers ---&gt;
132 &lt;M&gt; HCI USB driver
133 [*] SCO (voice) support
134 &lt;M&gt; HCI UART driver
135 [*] UART (H4) protocol support
136 [*] BCSP protocol support
137 [*] Transmit CRC with every BCSP packet
138 &lt;M&gt; HCI BCM203x USB driver
139 &lt;M&gt; HCI BPA10x USB driver
140 &lt;M&gt; HCI BlueFRITZ! USB driver
141 <comment>(The four drivers below are for PCMCIA Bluetooth devices and will only
142 show up if you have also selected PCMCIA support in your kernel.)</comment>
143 &lt;M&gt; HCI DTL1 (PC Card) driver
144 &lt;M&gt; HCI BT3C (PC Card) driver
145 &lt;M&gt; HCI BlueCard (PC Card) driver
146 &lt;M&gt; HCI UART (PC Card) device driver
147 <comment>(The driver below is intended for HCI Emulation software.)</comment>
148 &lt;M&gt; HCI VHCI (Virtual HCI device) driver
149
150 <comment>(Move back three levels to Device Drives and then check if USB is
151 enabled. This is required if you use a Bluetooth dongle, which are mostly USB
152 based.)</comment>
153 USB support ---&gt;
154
155 &lt;*&gt; Support for Host-side USB
156 --- USB Host Controller Drivers
157 &lt;M&gt; EHCI HCD (USB 2.0) support
158 [ ] Full speed ISO transactions (EXPERIMENTAL)
159 [ ] Root Hub Transaction Translators (EXPERIMENTAL)
160 &lt;*&gt; OHCI HCD support
161 &lt;*&gt; UHCI HCD (most Intel and VIA) support
162 &lt; &gt; SL811HS HCD support
163 </pre>
164
165 <p>
166 Now we'll reboot with our new kernel. If everything went fine, we will have a
167 system that is Bluetooth ready.
168 </p>
169
170 <impo>
171 Your USB device may have two modes the default of which may not be HCI, but HID.
172 If this is your case, use <c>hid2hci</c> to switch to HCI mode. Your system
173 will not remember this change when you next reboot.
174 </impo>
175
176 <pre caption="Checking the Bluetooth devices">
177 <comment>(One way to check for the device)</comment>
178 # <i>cat /proc/bus/usb/devices | grep -e^[TPD] | grep -e Cls=e0 -B1 -A1</i>
179 <comment>(The Cls=e0(unk. ) identifies the Bluetooth adapter.)</comment>
180 T: Bus=02 Lev=02 Prnt=03 Port=00 Cnt=01 Dev#= 4 Spd=12 MxCh= 0
181 D: Ver= 1.10 Cls=e0(unk. ) Sub=01 Prot=01 MxPS=64 #Cfgs= 1
182 P: Vendor=0a12 ProdID=0001 Rev= 5.25
183 <comment>(Some might show up on lsusb from sys-apps/usbutils)</comment>
184 # <i>lsusb</i>
185 Bus 003 Device 002: ID 046d:c00e Logitech, Inc. Optical Mouse
186 Bus 003 Device 001: ID 0000:0000
187 Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0db0:1967 Micro Star International Bluetooth Dongle
188 </pre>
189
190 </body>
191 </section>
192 </chapter>
193
194 <chapter id="bluez">
195 <title>BlueZ - The Bluetooth Stack</title>
196 <section>
197 <title>Installing BlueZ</title>
198 <body>
199
200 <p>
201 Now that the device is detected by the kernel, we need a layer that lets
202 applications communicate with the Bluetooth device. BlueZ provides the official
203 Linux Bluetooth stack. The ebuilds that provide what we need are
204 <c>bluez-libs</c> and <c>bluez-utils</c>. Devices that need Broadcom firmware
205 files or the like may need <c>bluez-firmware</c>.
206 </p>
207
208 <pre caption="Installing bluez-libs and bluez-utils">
209 # <i>emerge net-wireless/bluez-libs net-wireless/bluez-utils</i>
210 </pre>
211
212 <warn>
213 Do not emerge <c>bluez-kernel</c> or <c>bluez-sdp</c> as they will break
214 <c>bluez-utils</c>!
215 </warn>
216
217 <p>
218 Additionally, as we have compiled the Bluetooth subsystem as modules, we will
219 need hotplug and coldplug, which are explained in the <uri
220 link="http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/usb-guide.xml#doc_chap4_sect2">Gentoo Linux
221 USB Guide</uri>.
222 </p>
223
224 <pre caption="Emerging hotplug and coldplug">
225 # <i>emerge hotplug coldplug</i>
226 # <i>rc-update add coldplug boot</i>
227 </pre>
228
229 </body>
230 </section>
231 <section>
232 <title>BlueZ configuration and PIN pairing</title>
233 <body>
234
235 <p>
236 Now it's time to see if the Bluetooth device is being picked up correctly by the
237 system. We start up the required Bluetooth services first.
238 </p>
239
240 <pre caption="Running hciconfig">
241 <comment>(Start up Bluetooth)</comment>
242 # <i>/etc/init.d/bluetooth start</i>
243 * Starting Bluetooth ...
244 * Starting hcid ... [ ok ]
245 * Starting sdpd ... [ ok ]
246 * Starting rfcomm ... [ ok ]
247
248 # <i>hciconfig</i>
249 hci0: Type: USB
250 BD Address: 00:01:02:03:04:05 ACL MTU: 192:8 SCO MTU: 64:8
251 DOWN
252 RX bytes:131 acl:0 sco:0 events:18 errors:0
253 TX bytes:565 acl:0 sco:0 commands:17 errors:0
254 </pre>
255
256 <p>
257 This shows that the Bluetooth device has been recognised. As you might have
258 noticed the device is <e>DOWN</e>. Let's configure it so that we can bring it
259 up. The configuration file is at <path>/etc/bluetooth/hcid.conf</path>. The
260 required changes to the config file are shown below. For additional details
261 please refer to <c>man hcid.conf</c>.
262 </p>
263
264 <pre caption="Editing /etc/bluetooth/hcid.conf">
265 <comment>(Recommended changes to be made to the file are shown)</comment>
266
267 <comment>(Change security to "auto")</comment>
268 # Security Manager mode
269 # none - Security manager disabled
270 # auto - Use local PIN for incoming connections
271 # user - Always ask user for a PIN
272 #
273 security auto;
274
275 <comment>(Change pin_helper to use /etc/bluetooth/pin-helper)</comment>
276 # PIN helper
277 pin_helper /etc/bluetooth/pin-helper;
278
279 <comment>(Set your device name here, you can call it anything you want)</comment>
280 # Local device name
281 # %d - device id
282 # %h - host name
283 name "BlueZ at %h (%d)";
284
285 <comment>(Leave as is, if you don't know what exactly these do)</comment>
286 # Authentication and Encryption (Security Mode 3)
287 #auth enable;
288 #encrypt enable;
289 }
290 </pre>
291
292 <p>
293 After that, we have to configure the Bluetooth device PIN. That will help in
294 pairing this device with another one.
295 </p>
296
297 <note>
298 You can choose from different pin helpers, depending on what you want to use.
299 Available pin helpers are: <c>/usr/lib/kdebluetooth/kbluepin</c>
300 (net-wireless/kdebluetooth), <c>/usr/bin/bluepin</c> or
301 <c>/etc/bluetooth/pin-helper</c> among others.
302 </note>
303
304 <pre caption="Editing /etc/bluetooth/pin">
305 <comment>(Change 123456 with your desired pin number.)</comment>
306 123456
307 </pre>
308
309 <impo>
310 This number (of your choice) must be the same in all your hosts with Bluetooth
311 devices so they can be paired. This number must also be kept secret since anyone
312 with knowledge of this number can essentially establish connections with your
313 devices.
314 </impo>
315
316 </body>
317 </section>
318 <section>
319 <title>Services configuration</title>
320 <body>
321
322 <p>
323 Now that we have concluded with the configuration of BlueZ, it's time to restart
324 the necessary services.
325 </p>
326
327 <pre caption="Starting the Bluetooth daemons">
328 # <i>/etc/init.d/bluetooth restart</i>
329 <comment>(We can also add it to the default runlevel.)</comment>
330 # <i>rc-update add bluetooth default</i>
331 * bluetooth added to runlevel default
332 * rc-update complete.
333 </pre>
334
335 <p>
336 Let's be sure that the Bluetooth daemons started correctly. If we can see that
337 both <c>hcid</c> and <c>sdpd</c> are running, then we configured Bluetooth the
338 right way. After that, we can see if the devices are now up and running with
339 the configured options.
340 </p>
341
342 <pre caption="Checking whether Bluetooth daemons started correctly">
343 <comment>(Check to see if the services are running)</comment>
344 # <i>ps -ae | grep hcid</i>
345 26050 ? 00:00:00 hcid
346 # <i>ps -ae | grep sdpd</i>
347 26054 ? 00:00:00 sdpd
348
349 # <i>hciconfig -a</i>
350 hci0: Type: USB
351 BD Address: 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E ACL MTU: 192:8 SCO MTU: 64:8
352 UP RUNNING PSCAN ISCAN AUTH ENCRYPT
353 RX bytes:125 acl:0 sco:0 events:17 errors:0
354 TX bytes:565 acl:0 sco:0 commands:17 errors:0
355 Features: 0xff 0xff 0x0f 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00
356 Packet type: DM1 DM3 DM5 DH1 DH3 DH5 HV1 HV2 HV3
357 Link policy: RSWITCH HOLD SNIFF PARK
358 Link mode: SLAVE ACCEPT
359 Name: 'BlueZ at bluehat (0)'
360 Class: 0x3e0100
361 Service Classes: Networking, Rendering, Capturing, Object Transfer,
362 Audio
363 Device Class: Computer, Uncategorized
364 HCI Ver: 1.1 (0x1) HCI Rev: 0x1e7 LMP Ver: 1.1 (0x1) LMP Subver: 0x1e7
365 Manufacturer: Cambridge Silicon Radio (10)
366 </pre>
367
368 </body>
369 </section>
370 </chapter>
371
372 <chapter id="detect">
373 <title>Detecting and Connecting to Remote Devices</title>
374 <section>
375 <title>Detecting Bluetooth devices in other hosts</title>
376 <body>
377
378 <p>
379 At this point we are now ready to detect Bluetooth devices installed in other
380 machines. This is independent of the host Operating System. We will make use of
381 the <c>hcitool</c> command for the same.
382 </p>
383
384 <pre caption="Checking for local devices">
385 # <i>hcitool dev</i>
386 Devices:
387 hci0 00:01:02:03:04:05
388 </pre>
389
390 <pre caption="Scanning for remote devices">
391 # <i>hcitool scan</i>
392 Scanning ...
393 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E Grayhat
394 </pre>
395
396 <pre caption="Inquiring remote devices">
397 # <i>hcitool inq</i>
398 Inquiring ...
399 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E clock offset: 0x5579 class: 0x72010c
400 </pre>
401
402 <p>
403 Now that we know the MAC address of the remote Bluetooth devices, we can check
404 if we paired them correctly.
405 </p>
406
407 <pre caption="Running l2ping">
408 # <i>l2ping 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E</i>
409 Ping: 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E from 00:01:02:03:04:05 (data size 20) ...
410 20 bytes from 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E id 200 time 69.85ms
411 20 bytes from 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E id 201 time 9.97ms
412 20 bytes from 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E id 202 time 56.86ms
413 20 bytes from 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E id 203 time 39.92ms
414 4 sent, 4 received, 0% loss
415 </pre>
416
417 </body>
418 </section>
419 <section>
420 <title>Setting up Radio Frequency Communication (RFCOMM)</title>
421 <body>
422
423 <note>
424 Please note that setting up radio frequency communication is optional.
425 </note>
426
427 <p>
428 We can establish a radio frequency connection to another Bluetooth device using
429 the <c>rfcomm</c> command. To make things a little easier especially for users
430 with multiple devices that support Bluetooth, it is advisable to make a few
431 changes to the default rfcomm config at <path>/etc/bluetooth/rfcomm.conf</path>.
432 </p>
433
434 <p>
435 The whole segment of the config starting from <c>rfcomm0 {</c> and ending with
436 <c>}</c> is the config for the device that will establish a connection at
437 <path>/dev/rfcomm0</path>. In this case, we will only show one example, rfcomm0.
438 You can add more devices as you see fit.
439 </p>
440
441 <pre caption="Editing /etc/bluetooth/rfcomm.conf">
442 <comment>(Only changes that might be needed are shown)</comment>
443 rfcomm0 {
444 # Automatically bind the device at startup
445 <comment>(Creates the device node, /dev/rfcomm0 at start up)</comment>
446 bind yes;
447
448 # Bluetooth address of the device
449 <comment>(Enter the address of the device you want to connect to)</comment>
450 device 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E;
451
452 }
453 </pre>
454
455 <p>
456 After configuring RFCOMM, we can connect to any device. Since we've made the
457 required settings to the <path>/etc/bluetooth/rfcomm.conf</path> file, we just
458 issue the command shown below. In case you've not made changes to the config
459 file, an alternative method is also shown in the code listing that follows
460 </p>
461
462 <pre caption="Establishing an RFCOMM connection">
463 <comment>(The 0 refers to the rfcomm0 in the config file)</comment>
464 # <i>rfcomm connect 0 </i>
465 Connected /dev/rfcomm0 to 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E on channel 1
466 Press CTRL-C for hangup
467
468 <comment>(If you did not edit /etc/bluetooth/rfcomm.conf)</comment>
469 # <i>rfcomm connect 0 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E 1</i>
470 Connected /dev/rfcomm0 to 00:0F:DE:69:50:24 on channel 1
471 Press CTRL-C for hangup
472 </pre>
473
474 <p>
475 The first parameter after the connect command is the RFCOMM TTY device node
476 that will be used (usually 0). The second parameter is the MAC address of the
477 remote device. The third parameter is optional and specifies the channel to be
478 used. Please, note that in order to connect to a device, that device must be
479 listening for incoming connections. To do that, we have to explicitly tell it
480 to listen. We can cancel the communication at any moment by just hitting
481 CTRL+C.
482 </p>
483
484 <pre caption="Listening for incoming RFCOMM connections">
485 # <i>rfcomm listen 0 1</i>
486 Waiting for connection on channel 1
487 </pre>
488
489 <p>
490 In a similar way to the connect command, the listen command can receive two
491 parameters. The first one explicits the RFCOMM TTY device node (usually 0) that
492 will be used to accept a connection, while the second is the channel that will
493 be used.
494 </p>
495
496 <p>
497 Each time you call the <c>rfcomm</c> command, you can also specify the physical
498 device you want to use. Below you can see a small example specifiying the
499 physical device on the above two commands.
500 </p>
501
502 <pre caption="RFCOMM connections specifying physical device">
503 # <i>rfcomm -i hci0 listen 0 1</i>
504 Waiting for connection on channel 1
505 <comment>(To listen to a determined device) </comment>
506 # <i>rfcomm -i hci0 connect 0 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E 1</i>
507 <comment>(To use a determined device when connecting to another one)</comment>
508 </pre>
509
510 </body>
511 </section>
512 <section>
513 <title>Setting up a Personal Area Network (PAN)</title>
514 <body>
515
516 <note>
517 Please note that setting up a Personal Area Network is optional. This section
518 describes how to set up and connect to a Network Access Point, though setting
519 up a Group Ad-Hoc Network follows a similar way.
520 </note>
521
522 <p>
523 First of all, we need the <c>bnep</c> module loaded. And probably we want it
524 loaded each time the computer starts.
525 </p>
526
527 <pre caption="Loading the bnep module">
528 # <i>modprobe bnep</i>
529 # <i>echo "bnep" &gt;&gt; /etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6</i>
530 </pre>
531
532 <p>
533 We have to start the <c>pand</c> daemon in the host that will provide the NAP.
534 We'll have to specify that we want to provide a NAP service and that this host
535 will be the master, thus the other hosts that connect to it, the slaves.
536 Another possible service is GN (Group ad-hoc Network).
537 </p>
538
539 <pre caption="Running the pand daemon">
540 # <i>pand --listen --role NAP --master --autozap</i>
541 </pre>
542
543 <p>
544 After doing that, we have a host listening, so the rest of hosts just have to
545 connect to that one.
546 </p>
547
548 <pre caption="Connecting to the Network Access Point">
549 # <i>pand --connect 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E --service NAP --autozap</i>
550 </pre>
551
552 <p>
553 If everything went fine, we can now configure the IP addresses of our hosts.
554 </p>
555
556 <pre caption="bnep IP address configuration">
557 host0 #<i> ifconfig bnep0 192.168.2.1</i>
558 host1 #<i> ifconfig bnep0 192.168.2.2</i>
559
560 host0 #<i> ifconfig bnep0</i>
561 bnep0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0A:0B:0C:0D:0E
562 inet addr:192.168.2.1 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
563 inet6 addr: fe80::210:60ff:fea3:cb41/64 Scope:Link
564 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
565 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
566 TX packets:5 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
567 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
568 RX bytes:208 (208.0 b) TX bytes:188 (188.0 b)
569
570 host1 #<i> ifconfig bnep0</i>
571 bnep0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:01:02:03:04:05
572 inet addr:192.168.2.2 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
573 inet6 addr: fe80::210:60ff:fea2:dd2a/64 Scope:Link
574 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
575 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
576 TX packets:5 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
577 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
578 RX bytes:208 (208.0 b) TX bytes:188 (188.0 b)
579 </pre>
580
581 <p>
582 Finally, we can do a simple test to see that the network is working fine.
583 </p>
584
585 <pre caption="IP ping between bnep interfaces">
586 host1 #<i> ping 192.168.2.1</i>
587 PING 192.168.2.1 (192.168.2.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
588 64 bytes from 192.168.2.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=34.0 ms
589 64 bytes from 192.168.2.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=37.3 ms
590
591 --- 192.168.2.1 ping statistics ---
592 2 packets transmitted, 2 received, 0% packet loss, time 1000ms
593 rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 34.045/35.690/37.336/1.656 ms
594 </pre>
595
596 </body>
597 </section>
598 </chapter>
599
600 <chapter id="apps">
601 <title>Desktop Applications for Bluetooth</title>
602 <section>
603 <title>Introduction</title>
604 <body>
605
606 <p>
607 We have quite a few Bluetooth applications that run on the desktop and this
608 chapter has been divided into 3 parts, one each for Gnome, KDE and Miscellaneous
609 applications.
610 </p>
611
612 </body>
613 </section>
614 <section>
615 <title>For Gnome</title>
616 <body>
617
618 <p>
619 If you are a gnome user, you will most probably go with <c>gnome-bluetooth</c>.
620 It provides the most basic yet most used functionalities, as you can see below.
621 </p>
622
623 <ul>
624 <li><c>gnome-bluetooth-manager</c>: To manage Bluetooth remote devices.</li>
625 <li><c>gnome-obex-send</c>: To send files to other devices.</li>
626 <li><c>gnome-obex-server</c>: To receive files.</li>
627 </ul>
628
629 <pre caption="Installing gnome-bluetooth">
630 # <i>emerge gnome-bluetooth</i>
631 </pre>
632
633 <p>
634 This adds menu entries under Applications &gt; System Tools from where you can
635 easily start up the manager or File sharing to transfer files between devices.
636 </p>
637
638 <p>
639 To transfer files (the easy way):
640 </p>
641
642 <ul>
643 <li>
644 From the Phone to the Computer - Send the file from the phone via Bluetooth
645 and it will be picked up and saved to your <path>/home</path> always.
646 </li>
647 <!--FIXME : Doesn't work on Nautilus 2.10.x. Bug #103464 for details -->
648 <!--
649 <li>
650 From the Computer to the Phone - Fire up <c>nautilus</c> and select the
651 file you want to send and right click on it. Select the Send via Bluetooth
652 option and ask your phone to accept the file.
653 </li>
654 -->
655 </ul>
656
657 <p>
658 <c>gnome-phone-manager</c> is a nifty app that you can use to send and receive
659 messages to and from your phone, using only your system. You do not have to
660 touch your phone to read or send messages since all that happens through the
661 application. You are also notified of a new message on your screen if the option
662 is enabled under Preferences. Installation is a breeze as always.
663 </p>
664
665 <pre caption="Installing gnome-phone-manager">
666 # <i>emerge gnome-phone-manager</i>
667 </pre>
668
669 </body>
670 </section>
671 <section>
672 <title>For KDE</title>
673 <body>
674
675 <p>
676 KDE makes use of <c>kdebluetooth</c> and provides more utilities than its Gnome
677 counterpart as seen below.
678 </p>
679
680 <ul>
681 <li><c>kbluetoothd</c>: Bluetooth Meta Server.</li>
682 <li><c>kbtsearch</c>: Bluetooth device/service search utility.</li>
683 <li><c>khciconfig</c>: KDE Bluetooth Monitor.</li>
684 <li><c>kioclient</c>: KIO command line client.</li>
685 <li><c>qobexclient</c>: Swiss army knife for obex testing/development.</li>
686 <li><c>kbtobexclient</c>: A KDE Bluetooth Framework Application.</li>
687 <li><c>kioobex_start</c></li>
688 <li><c>kbtserialchat</c></li>
689 <li><c>kbemusedsrv</c>: KDE Bemused Server.</li>
690 <li><c>kbtobexsrv</c>: KDE OBEX Push Server for Bluetooth.</li>
691 <li><c>kbluepin</c>: A KDE KPart Application.</li>
692 <li>
693 <c>auth-helper</c>: A helper program for kbtobexsrv that sends an
694 authentication request for a given ACL link.
695 </li>
696 </ul>
697
698 <pre caption="Installing kdebluetooth">
699 # <i>emerge kdebluetooth</i>
700 </pre>
701
702 </body>
703 </section>
704 <section>
705 <title>Other Interesting Applications</title>
706 <body>
707
708 <ul>
709 <li>
710 <c>app-mobilephone/obexftp</c>: File transfer over OBEX for mobile phones
711 </li>
712 <li>
713 <c>app-mobilephone/bemused</c>: Bemused is a system which allows you to
714 control your music collection from your phone, using Bluetooth.
715 </li>
716 <li>
717 <c>app-pda/multisync</c>: Multisync allows you to sync contacts, calendar
718 entries and notes from your mobile phone with your computer, over a
719 Bluetooth connection (amongst other things). It includes such features as
720 backing up this information and restoring it later, and syncing with the
721 Evolution e-mail client. You will need the <c>irmc</c> USE flag set to
722 ensure that <c>multisync</c> has Bluetooth support.
723 </li>
724 <li>
725 <c>media-plugins/xmms-btexmms</c>: Btexmms is an XMMS plugin that allows
726 you to use your Bluetooth-enabled (Sony) Ericsson mobile phone as a remote
727 control for XMMS.
728 </li>
729 </ul>
730
731 </body>
732 </section>
733 </chapter>
734
735 <chapter>
736 <title>Acknowledgements</title>
737 <section>
738 <body>
739
740 <p>
741 Special thanks to <mail link="marcel@holtmann.org">Marcel Holtmann</mail>
742 for his time and dedication to the Bluetooth development and for reviewing this
743 guide. And big thanks to <mail link="puggy@gentoo.org">Douglas Russell</mail>
744 for performing additional hardware tests and improving this guide.
745 </p>
746
747 </body>
748 </section>
749 </chapter>
750 </guide>

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