/[gentoo]/xml/htdocs/doc/en/gentoo-kernel.xml
Gentoo

Contents of /xml/htdocs/doc/en/gentoo-kernel.xml

Parent Directory Parent Directory | Revision Log Revision Log


Revision 1.4 - (hide annotations) (download) (as text)
Sat Nov 15 00:35:18 2003 UTC (10 years, 5 months ago) by neysx
Branch: MAIN
Changes since 1.3: +1 -0 lines
File MIME type: application/xml
Added $Header$ cvs tag -- NO CONTENT CHANGE

1 swift 1.1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
2 neysx 1.4 <!-- $Header$ -->
3 swift 1.1
4     <!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
5     <guide link="/doc/en/gentoo-kernel.xml">
6     <title>Gentoo Linux Kernel Guide</title>
7     <author title="Author">
8     <mail link="swift@gentoo.org">Sven Vermeulen</mail>
9     </author>
10     <author title="Contributor">
11     <mail link="lostlogic@gentoo.org">Brandon Low</mail>
12     </author>
13     <author title="Editor">
14     <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail>
15     </author>
16     <author title="Editor">
17     <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail>
18     </author>
19    
20 swift 1.2 <license/>
21    
22 swift 1.1 <abstract>
23     This document gives you an overview on all kernelsources that Gentoo
24     provides through Portage.
25     </abstract>
26    
27 swift 1.3 <version>0.2</version>
28     <date>October 18, 2003</date>
29 swift 1.1
30     <chapter>
31     <title>Introduction</title>
32     <section>
33     <body>
34    
35     <p>
36     As with everything else in Gentoo Linux, the philosophy of the Gentoo
37     Kernel team is to give you, the user, as much freedom of choice as
38     possible. If you take a look at the output of <c>emerge -s sources</c>
39     you see a large variety of kernels to choose from. In this document,
40     I will attempt to give you a brief rundown of the goals of each of the
41     patch sets, which we at Gentoo design, and also explain the other kernel
42     sources we make available to you.
43     </p>
44    
45     </body>
46     </section>
47     </chapter>
48    
49     <chapter>
50     <title>The Choices, Part I</title>
51     <section>
52     <title>gentoo-sources</title>
53     <body>
54    
55     <p>
56     For most users, the recommended kernel sources are the
57     <c>gentoo-sources</c>. The <c>gentoo-sources</c> package contains
58     specially tuned performance kernel patches designed to optimize tasks
59     such as compiling while listening to music and browsing the web. Most
60     of you who are new to Gentoo have probably never run a system where you
61     are regularly compiling many packages from source while you are doing your
62     normal everyday tasks on your computer.
63     You may find that if you use the <c>vanilla-sources</c> (the official
64     kernel sources released from <uri>http://www.kernel.org</uri>) normal tasks --
65     such as listening to music, moving your mouse and the like -- may appear
66     jumpy when you are compiling packages.
67     </p>
68    
69     <p>
70     The <c>gentoo-sources</c> contain an updated ACPI subsystem and are based
71     on Con Kolivas' high-performance kernel patches (<c>ck-sources</c>). We also
72     support grSecurity (a set of security-related patches with support for
73     ACLs), EVMS(2) (a highly flexible storage management filesystem with easy
74     partition resizing), JFS (IBM's high-performance filesystem), the latest
75     NTFS drivers, and more.
76     </p>
77    
78     <p>
79     Because the <c>gentoo-sources</c> are targeted at full performance, they are
80     also very good for gaming purposes.
81     </p>
82    
83     <p>
84     The following USE-flags can be set to select optional patches:
85     </p>
86    
87     <table>
88     <tr><th>Flag</th><th>Description</th></tr>
89     <tr><ti>aavm</ti><ti>Use Andrea Arcangeli's memory management</ti></tr>
90     <tr><ti>evms2</ti><ti>Use EVMS 2.0.1 instead of EVMS 1.2.1</ti></tr>
91     <tr><ti>crypt</ti><ti>Apply Cryptographic patches</ti></tr>
92     <tr><ti>usagi</ti><ti>Keep USAGI, drop superfreeswan, patch-int, loop-jari</ti></tr>
93     </table>
94    
95    
96     </body>
97     </section>
98     <section>
99     <title>vanilla-sources</title>
100     <body>
101    
102     <p>
103     The next kernel sources that many of you will probably be familiar with
104     as Linux users are the <c>vanilla-sources</c>. As I mentioned briefly
105     above, these are the official kernel sources released on
106     <uri>http://www.kernel.org/</uri>. These sources are maintained (contrary
107     to popular belief) not by Linus Torvalds himself, but by Marcelo
108     Tosatti. Linus is the leader of active kernel development, but as he is
109     only one man, he passes off the maintenance of the stable kernel branch
110     to someone he can trust to handle it once it has stabilized. Thus, Alan
111     Cox became the maintainer of the Linux-2.2 kernel series and Marcelo
112     Tosatti became the maintainer of the Linux-2.4 kernel series. This is
113     what all the other patch sets in the 2.4 series are based on. Marcelo has
114     been doing an outstanding job with its maintenance and it can be
115     counted on for stability and up-to-date (if not bleeding edge) hardware
116     support.
117     </p>
118    
119     <p>
120     <c>vanilla-sources</c> are probably the most stable sources available
121     since they are the most tested and all possible kernel sources are based
122     on them. If you don't need any of the extras that the other kernels supply
123     then the <c>vanilla-sources</c> are your thing.
124     </p>
125    
126     </body>
127     </section>
128     <section>
129     <title>gs-sources</title>
130     <body>
131    
132     <p>
133     For users to whom desktop interactive performance comes as a secondary
134     priority to reliability and hardware support, we have the
135     <c>gs-sources</c>. GS stands for Gentoo Stable (creative, aren't we?).
136     This patch set is tuned and tested to provide the best support for the
137     latest hardware and ensures that your mission critical servers will be
138     up when you need them. This kernel doesn't have some of the most
139     aggressive performance tuning patches from the <c>gentoo-sources</c>,
140     but rest assured, the great performance that you know and love from the
141     vanilla kernels are alive and well. Where possible and without
142     compromising stability we add server related performance patches.
143     </p>
144    
145     <p>
146     This kernel provides support for the latest ACPI subsystem, EVMS, ECC
147     (required for HA Linux systems), Encrypted Loopback devices, NTFS, Win4Lin
148     and XFS. It also contains updates for IDE, ext3 and several network cards
149     amongst other patches.
150     </p>
151    
152     <p>
153     In other words, these sources are perfect for servers and
154     High-Availability systems.
155     </p>
156    
157     <p>
158     The following USE-flags can be set to select optional patches:
159     </p>
160    
161     <table>
162     <tr><th>Flags</th><th>Description</th></tr>
163     <tr><ti>crypt</ti><ti>Apply cryptographic patches</ti></tr>
164     </table>
165    
166     </body>
167     </section>
168     <section>
169 swift 1.3 <title>gentoo-test-sources</title>
170 swift 1.1 <body>
171    
172     <p>
173 swift 1.3 <c>gentoo-test-sources</c> are what will become <c>gentoo-sources</c> after
174 swift 1.1 lots of testing and QA. Patches to the <c>gentoo-sources</c> are first
175 swift 1.3 added to <c>gentoo-test-sources</c> for testing. So if you want the
176 swift 1.1 performance of <c>gentoo-sources</c> with the most recent possible
177 swift 1.3 patches, use <c>gentoo-test-sources</c>.
178 swift 1.1 </p>
179    
180     <p>
181     The following USE-flags can be set to select optional patches:
182     </p>
183    
184     <table>
185     <tr><th>Flag</th><th>Description</th></tr>
186     <tr><ti>aavm</ti><ti>Use Andrea Arcangeli's memory management</ti></tr>
187     <tr><ti>evms2</ti><ti>Use EVMS 2.0.1 instead of EVMS 1.2.1</ti></tr>
188     <tr><ti>crypt</ti><ti>Apply Cryptographic patches</ti></tr>
189     <tr><ti>usagi</ti><ti>Keep USAGI, drop superfreeswan, patch-int, loop-jari</ti></tr>
190     </table>
191    
192     </body>
193     </section>
194     <section>
195     <title>hardened-sources</title>
196     <body>
197    
198     <p>
199     <c>hardened-sources</c> provides patches for the various subprojects of
200     Gentoo Hardened, together with stability/security-enhancements. Check
201     <uri>http://www.gentoo.org/proj/en/hardened/</uri> for more information.
202     </p>
203    
204     <p>
205     The following USE-flags can be set to select optional patches:
206     </p>
207    
208     <table>
209     <tr><th>Flags</th><th>Description</th></tr>
210     <tr><ti>selinux</ti><ti>Substitute grSecurity with SELinux support</ti></tr>
211     </table>
212    
213     </body>
214     </section>
215     <section>
216     <title>xfs-sources</title>
217     <body>
218    
219     <p>
220     <c>xfs-sources</c> contains support for EVMS, ACPI, grSecurity and, what
221     you probably already figured out by now, the latest XFS support patches
222     from the XFS Development. The Gentoo LiveCD uses <c>xfs-sources</c>, if
223     you must know :-)
224     </p>
225    
226     <p>
227     More information about XFS on <uri>http://oss.sgi.com/projects/xfs/</uri>.
228     </p>
229    
230     <p>
231     You can select the following USE-flags to select optional patches:
232     </p>
233    
234     <table>
235     <tr><th>Flags</th><th>Description</th></tr>
236     <tr><ti>crypt</ti><ti>Apply cryptographic patches</ti></tr>
237     </table>
238    
239     </body>
240     </section>
241     <section>
242     <title>Architecture dependent kernels</title>
243     <body>
244    
245     <p>
246     <c>alpha-sources</c>, <c>arm-sources</c>, <c>hppa-sources</c>,
247     <c>mips-sources</c>, <c>ppc-sources</c> and <c>sparc-sources</c> are, as
248     their names suggest, patched to run best on specific architectures. They
249     also contain some of the patches for hardware and features support from
250     the other patch sets mentioned above and below.
251     </p>
252    
253     </body>
254     </section>
255     <section>
256     <title>ppc-sources-benh</title>
257     <body>
258    
259     <p>
260     The <c>ppc-sources-benh</c> ebuilds provide additional hardware
261     support for the <c>ppc-sources</c> kernel. It is slightly more
262     experimental than the <c>ppc-sources</c>.
263     </p>
264    
265     </body>
266     </section>
267     <section>
268     <title>ppc-sources-crypto</title>
269     <body>
270    
271     <p>
272     The <c>ppc-sources-crypto</c> ebuilds provide CryptoAPI
273     support for the Gentoo Linux PPC Kernel. More information about
274     CryptoAPI can be found on <uri>http://www.kerneli.org/about/</uri>.
275     </p>
276    
277     </body>
278     </section>
279     <section>
280     <title>ppc-sources-dev</title>
281     <body>
282    
283     <p>
284     The <c>ppc-sources-dev</c> packages provide the development sources for
285     <c>ppc-sources</c>. Every patch which should become part of
286     <c>ppc-sources</c> has to go through <c>ppc-sources-dev</c> first.
287     </p>
288    
289     </body>
290     </section>
291     <section>
292     <title>compaq-sources</title>
293     <body>
294    
295     <p>
296     The <c>compaq-sources</c> provide RedHat's kernel sources for Alpha,
297     maintained by Compaq.
298     </p>
299    
300     </body>
301     </section>
302     </chapter>
303    
304     <chapter>
305     <title>The Choices, Part II</title>
306     <section>
307     <body>
308    
309     <p>
310     Now I'm going to try to briefly describe some of the other
311     <path>sys-kernel/*-sources</path> which you saw scroll by when you ran
312     <c>emerge -s sources</c>. Lets take them in alphabetical order.
313     </p>
314    
315     </body>
316     </section>
317     <section>
318     <title>aa-sources</title>
319     <body>
320    
321     <p>
322     First we have <c>aa-sources</c>. This is Andrea Arcangeli's patch set.
323     Andrea is known as an amazing coder by many other kernel hackers. His
324     kernel patch set has some of the most aggressively tuned VM (Virtual
325     Memory) patches known to mankind. When I last looked, it also contained
326     SGI's XFS filesystem and the O(1) scheduler by Ingo Molar (which will
327     become the default scheduler for Linux 2.6).
328     </p>
329    
330     <p>
331     It also provides User Mode Linux support (check out our
332     <uri link="/doc/en/uml.xml">UML Guide</uri> for more information) and
333     the latest TUX Webserver (an in-kernel webserver).
334     </p>
335    
336     <p>
337     If you have Memory Management troubles with other kernels,
338     <c>aa-sources</c> can be your solution. If you want to optimize Linux's
339     Memory Management for your system, <c>aa-sources</c> is <e>definitely</e>
340     what you need.
341     </p>
342    
343     <p>
344     Visit
345     <uri>http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/andrea/kernels/v2.4</uri>
346     for more information about all the patches in these kernel sources.
347     </p>
348    
349     </body>
350     </section>
351     <section>
352     <title>ac-sources</title>
353     <body>
354    
355     <p>
356     Next we have the <c>ac-sources</c>. This is Alan Cox's patch set against
357     the 2.4 kernel series. In this patch set you will find the O(1)
358     scheduler, the latest updates to the 2.4 IDE system and many other
359     patches that are waiting for possible inclusion in the 2.4 kernel
360     series.
361     </p>
362    
363     <p>
364     This kernel is known to have very decent support for several additional
365     hardware and may be a candidate for you if you need a stable but less
366     conservative kernel than the <c>vanilla-sources</c>.
367     </p>
368    
369     <p>
370     Check out
371     <uri>http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/alan/linux-2.4/</uri>
372     to get a look at what Alan is working on.
373     </p>
374    
375     </body>
376     </section>
377     <section>
378     <title>ck-sources</title>
379     <body>
380    
381     <p>
382     <c>ck-sources</c> is Con Kolivas's kernel patch set. This kernel is
383     <e>HIGHLY</e> tuned for desktop performance at the expense of
384     throughput and some of the scheduler's ability to prioritize
385     applications. Con Kolivas benchmarks kernels to find the best
386     combination of features for desktop use. See
387     <uri>http://kernel.kolivas.org</uri> for more information on Con and his
388     patches.
389     </p>
390    
391     </body>
392     </section>
393     <section>
394     <title>development-sources</title>
395     <body>
396    
397     <p>
398     <c>development-sources</c> is the current unstable kernel branch. This
399     is the branch of the Linux kernel that Linus himself maintains. This
400     rapidly changing playground is where the features for the next stable
401     branch are implemented, enhanced and tested before they are released
402     to the vast majority of Linux users.
403     </p>
404    
405     <p>
406     If you want the latest, bleeding edge support and experimental core-system
407     changes, this is what you want. Note however that these are <e>highly</e>
408     experimental kernel sources and it is advised <e>not</e> to use them on mission
409     critical or production systems.
410     </p>
411    
412     <warn>
413     Do note that Gentoo Linux does not support issues with or related
414     to the <c>development-sources</c> or derivatives as it changes too often
415     and is known to break things occasionally.
416     </warn>
417    
418     </body>
419     </section>
420     <section>
421     <title>gaming-sources</title>
422     <body>
423    
424     <p>
425     <c>gaming-sources</c> are based on <c>ck-sources</c> and are therefore
426     tuned for high performance. They also contain patches for the latest
427     game-related hardware (graphic cards, sound cards, and such).
428     </p>
429    
430     <p>
431     If you are a hardcore gamer, this is your choice.
432     </p>
433    
434     </body>
435     </section>
436     <section>
437     <title>mm-sources</title>
438     <body>
439    
440     <p>
441     The <c>mm-sources</c> are based on the <c>development-sources</c> and
442     contain Andrew Morton's patch set. It assembles several other patches,
443     like ext2/3 Extended Attributes and Access Control Lists, Page Table
444     Sharing, the Orlov Allocator, non-linear mapping behaviour, etc into one
445     patch set.
446     </p>
447    
448     <p>
449     If you really want to live on the edge and you think
450     <c>development-sources</c> are for wussies, then try out
451     <c>mm-sources</c>.
452     </p>
453    
454     </body>
455     </section>
456     <section>
457     <title>mosix-sources</title>
458     <body>
459    
460     <p>
461     The <c>mosix-sources</c> are patched to support MOSIX operation for
462     clustered computing. A cluster is a set of nodes (PCs) with software
463     that enables them to handle tasks in a distributed manner. With
464     clusters, you don't need high-profile supercomputers to do lengthy
465     tasks. For more information see <uri>http://www.mosix.org</uri>.
466     </p>
467    
468     </body>
469     </section>
470     <section>
471     <title>openmosix-sources</title>
472     <body>
473    
474     <p>
475     The <c>openmosix-sources</c> are patched to support the openMosix system
476     (like MOSIX but Open Source). For more information see
477     <uri>http://www.openmosix.org</uri>.
478     </p>
479    
480     </body>
481     </section>
482    
483     <!--
484     TODO: Add descriptions of the other ppc-sources here
485     -->
486    
487     <section>
488     <title>redhat-sources</title>
489     <body>
490    
491     <p>
492     The <c>redhat-sources</c> are, as the name suggests, the sources for the
493     RedHat Linux kernel. Thanks to the wonders of Open Source, anyone can
494     take advantage of the work the RedHat engineers put into making their
495     kernels. We at Gentoo have provided an ebuild so that you can easily
496     use this kernel with Gentoo.
497     </p>
498    
499     </body>
500     </section>
501     <section>
502     <title>rsbac-sources</title>
503     <body>
504    
505     <p>
506     <c>rsbac-sources</c> contain the patches from
507     <uri>http://www.rsbac.org</uri>. RSBAC stands for <e>Rule Set Based
508     Access Control</e>. These kernel patches allow you to authorize users
509     based on rules instead of normal uid/gid permissions.
510     </p>
511    
512     </body>
513     </section>
514     <section>
515     <title>selinux-sources</title>
516     <body>
517    
518     <p>
519     <c>selinux-sources</c> from <uri>http://www.nsa.gov/selinux</uri> are
520     patches for the security conscious to support the LSM (Linux Security
521     Modules) and the Flask Security Architecture.
522     </p>
523    
524     </body>
525     </section>
526     <section>
527     <title>usermode-sources</title>
528     <body>
529    
530     <p>
531     <c>usermode-sources</c> are the User Mode Linux kernel patches. This
532     kernel is designed to allow Linux to run within Linux to run within Linux
533     to ... User Mode Linux is intended for testing and virtual server support.
534     For more information about this amazing tribute to the stability and
535     scalability of Linux, see <uri>http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net</uri>.
536     </p>
537    
538     <p>
539     For more information on UML and Gentoo, read the
540     <uri link="/doc/en/uml.xml">Gentoo UML Guide</uri>.
541     </p>
542    
543     </body>
544     </section>
545     <section>
546     <title>win4lin-sources</title>
547     <body>
548    
549     <p>
550     <c>win4lin-sources</c> are patched to support the userland win4lin tools
551     that allow Linux users to run many Microsoft Windows (TM) applications
552     at almost native speeds. See <uri>http://www.netraverse.com/</uri> for more
553     information.
554     </p>
555    
556     </body>
557     </section>
558     <section>
559     <title>wolk-sources</title>
560     <body>
561    
562     <p>
563     <c>wolk-sources</c> contains the <e>Working Overloaded Linux Kernel</e> from
564     <uri>http://sourceforge.net/projects/wolk</uri>. This kernel contains
565     many patches of a wide variety, all combined into the kernel with
566     extreme care. This allows you to configure nearly every one into and out
567     of the kernel at compile time -- so the kernel will work with nearly any
568     combination of the patches.
569     </p>
570    
571     <p>
572     If you need a certain combination of patches that you cannot find in other
573     kernel sources, WOLK is definitely worth a shot.
574     </p>
575    
576     </body>
577     </section>
578     </chapter>
579     </guide>

  ViewVC Help
Powered by ViewVC 1.1.20