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#99490, new guide: using a mouse within a console (gpm)

1 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
2 <!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
3 <!-- $Header$ -->
4
5 <guide link="/doc/en/gpm.xml">
6 <title>Using a Mouse within the Console</title>
7
8 <author title="Author">
9 <mail link="jackdark@gmail.com">Joshua Saddler</mail>
10 </author>
11
12 <abstract>
13 This guide shows you how to set up and use gpm (the General
14 Purpose Mouse server) from within a command line interface.
15 This is especially useful for new Gentoo installations or
16 for systems that cannot or do not use an X server.
17 </abstract>
18
19 <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
20 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
21 <license/>
22
23 <version>1.0</version>
24 <date>2005-07-19</date>
25
26 <chapter>
27 <title>Getting gpm</title>
28 <section>
29 <body>
30
31 <p>
32 If you've just installed Gentoo, you almost certainly don't have your mouse
33 set up to work within a command line interface (CLI) yet. Or perhaps you
34 can't use or don't need an X server, yet you still need to use a mouse. The
35 solution is simple: <c>gpm</c>, the General Purpose Mouse server.
36 </p>
37
38 <p>
39 First, you will need to get gpm:
40 </p>
41
42 <pre caption="Obtaining gpm">
43 # <i>emerge gpm</i>
44 </pre>
45
46 <p>
47 You might have noticed a few messages during the compilation that warned
48 about configuring the server. You must do this before starting gpm.
49 </p>
50
51 </body>
52 </section>
53 </chapter>
54
55 <chapter>
56 <title>Configuring gpm</title>
57 <section>
58 <body>
59
60 <p>
61 Before you can use gpm, you will need to uncomment the lines
62 corresponding to the location and protocol of your mouse. You do this by
63 editing the gpm configuration file:
64 </p>
65
66 <pre caption="Setting up gpm">
67 # <i>nano /etc/conf.d/gpm</i>
68 </pre>
69
70 <p>
71 In my case, I have a USB mouse on <path>/dev/input/mouse0</path>. So, I
72 have uncommented <path>/dev/input/mice</path>, as this is the cumulative
73 device for all mice on the system, and the appropriate protocol.
74 Try using <path>/dev/input/mice</path> before <path>/dev/psaux</path>, as
75 the latter is deprecated and can be disabled in the latest 2.6 kernels. If
76 <path>/dev/input/mice</path> fails, then fall back to other devices. Here is
77 my example <path>/etc/conf.d/gpm</path>:
78 </p>
79
80 <pre caption="Example gpm config">
81 <comment># Please uncomment the type of mouse you have and the appropriate MOUSEDEV entry</comment>
82
83 #MOUSE=ps2
84 MOUSE=imps2
85 #MOUSEDEV=/dev/psaux
86 MOUSEDEV=/dev/input/mice
87 </pre>
88
89 <p>
90 If you have a wheelmouse, you will want to use the imps2 protocol, so
91 uncomment that line. If imps2 and ps2 both fail to work for you, please
92 refer to the gpm info page (<c>info gpm</c>) for other protocols to try.
93 Also, if you want to be able to click on hyperlinks in terminals to
94 navigate to a website, it is a good idea to follow the suggestion in the
95 <c>/etc/conf.d/gpm</c> file:
96 </p>
97
98 <pre caption="Other options">
99 <comment># Please uncomment this line if you want gpm to understand charsets</comment>
100 <comment># used in URLs and names with ~ or : in them, etc.</comment>
101 <comment># This is a good idea to turn on!</comment>
102
103 APPEND="-l \"a-zA-Z0-9_.:~/\300-\326\330-\366\370-\377\""
104 </pre>
105
106 <p>
107 The rest of the conf.d file contains other suggestions for your mouse server;
108 uncomment the various options according to your needs. See <c>man gpm</c>
109 for more information.
110 </p>
111
112 </body>
113 </section>
114 </chapter>
115
116 <chapter>
117 <title>Running gpm</title>
118 <section>
119 <body>
120
121 <p>
122 Now that your mouse server is installed and configured, it's time to start
123 using it:
124 </p>
125
126 <pre caption="The gpm init script">
127 # <i>/etc/init.d/gpm start</i>
128 </pre>
129
130 <p>
131 You should see a block cursor appear. Remember that only root can run the gpm
132 init script. However, to avoid having to <c>su</c> and run the script every
133 single time you begin a new session, why not set gpm to begin every time you
134 turn on your computer?
135 </p>
136
137 <pre caption="Adding gpm to the default runlevel">
138 # <i>rc-update add gpm default</i>
139 </pre>
140
141 <p>
142 Now, whenever you start your computer, you'll be greeted by the console cursor
143 by the time you get to the login prompt. The mouse server will continue to run
144 even if you're not logged in as root.
145 </p>
146
147 </body>
148 </section>
149 </chapter>
150
151 <chapter>
152 <title>Working with gpm</title>
153 <section>
154 <title>Copying and pasting</title>
155 <body>
156
157 <p>
158 Copying and pasting large blocks of text with a working mouse server is very
159 easy. Simply highlight the text with the left mouse button (it will stay
160 highlighted when you release the button), switch to a different terminal if you
161 wish, position the cursor, and press the middle mouse button to paste the text
162 where you placed the cursor. Note that you can copy and paste without ever
163 leaving the terminal you started. This makes posting the output of error
164 messages to the <uri link="http://forums.gentoo.org">Gentoo forums</uri>
165 extremely simple.
166 </p>
167
168 </body>
169 </section>
170 <section>
171 <title>Text-mode browsing and gpm</title>
172 <body>
173
174 <p>
175 If you have a message on one screen and a text-mode web browser on the other,
176 you can copy the error message by highlighting it, then change to the other
177 terminal, left-click the appropriate text entry box to select it, and then press
178 the middle mouse button. Voila! Your error message can now be posted to the
179 forums.
180 </p>
181
182 <p>
183 Though discussion of text-only browsers is somewhat beyond the scope of this
184 guide, inevitably users will need to find a compatible console browser. Though
185 <c>lynx</c> is most likely the oldest and well established browser, its
186 interface has poor mouse support and recognition. Instead, try using
187 <c>links</c>, the same browser which is also included in the Gentoo Installation
188 CDs. <c>links</c> has excellent mouse integration:
189 </p>
190
191 <pre caption="Obtaining links">
192 # <i>emerge links</i>
193 </pre>
194
195 <p>
196 This concludes the guide to using a mouse within the console. Happy mousing!
197 </p>
198
199 </body>
200 </section>
201 </chapter>
202
203 </guide>

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