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Enhancing information on downsides wrt multiple partitions.

This hopefully also clears up some of the confusion that is surrounding
separate /usr partitions. Yes, it now mentions that an initramfs might be
needed in that case.

And no, we do not "recommend" a separate /usr partition, nor do we
"not recommend" it.

1 swift 1.1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2     <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3    
4     <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 swift 1.18 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6 swift 1.1
7 swift 1.32 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-alpha-disk.xml,v 1.31 2011/08/22 17:18:23 swift Exp $ -->
8 swift 1.1
9     <sections>
10 swift 1.10
11 swift 1.32 <version>11</version>
12     <date>2011-10-17</date>
13 swift 1.10
14 swift 1.1 <section>
15     <title>Introduction to Block Devices</title>
16 nightmorph 1.28
17 swift 1.1 <subsection>
18 nightmorph 1.28 <include href="hb-install-blockdevices.xml"/>
19     </subsection>
20 swift 1.1
21     <subsection>
22     <title>Slices</title>
23     <body>
24    
25     <p>
26     Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house your Linux
27     system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices
28     are split up in smaller, more manageable block devices. On Alpha systems,
29     these are called <e>slices</e>.
30     </p>
31    
32     </body>
33     </subsection>
34     </section>
35     <section>
36     <title>Designing a Partitioning Scheme</title>
37     <subsection>
38     <title>Default Partitioning Scheme</title>
39     <body>
40    
41     <p>
42     As an example we use the following slice layout:
43     </p>
44    
45     <table>
46     <tr>
47     <th>Slice</th>
48     <th>Description</th>
49     </tr>
50     <tr>
51 swift 1.5 <ti><path>/dev/sda1</path></ti>
52 swift 1.1 <ti>Swap slice</ti>
53     </tr>
54     <tr>
55 swift 1.5 <ti><path>/dev/sda2</path></ti>
56 swift 1.1 <ti>Root slice</ti>
57     </tr>
58     <tr>
59 swift 1.5 <ti><path>/dev/sda3</path></ti>
60 swift 1.1 <ti>Full disk (required)</ti>
61     </tr>
62     </table>
63    
64    
65     <p>
66     If you are interested in knowing how big a partition should be, or even how
67     many partitions (or volumes) you need, read on. Otherwise continue now with
68 swift 1.17 <uri link="#fdisk_SRM">Using fdisk to Partition your Disk (SRM only)</uri>
69     or <uri link="#fdisk_ARC">Using fdisk to Partition your Disk (ARC/AlphaBIOS
70     only)</uri>.
71 swift 1.1 </p>
72    
73     </body>
74     </subsection>
75     <subsection>
76     <title>How Many and How Big?</title>
77     <body>
78    
79     <p>
80     The number of partitions is highly dependent on your environment. For instance,
81     if you have lots of users, you will most likely want to have your
82     <path>/home</path> separate as it increases security and makes backups easier.
83     If you are installing Gentoo to perform as a mailserver, your
84     <path>/var</path> should be separate as all mails are stored inside
85     <path>/var</path>. A good choice of filesystem will then maximise your
86     performance. Gameservers will have a separate <path>/opt</path> as most gaming
87     servers are installed there. The reason is similar for <path>/home</path>:
88 swift 1.18 security and backups. You will definitely want to keep <path>/usr</path> big:
89     not only will it contain the majority of applications, the Portage tree alone
90     takes around 500 Mbyte excluding the various sources that are stored in it.
91 swift 1.1 </p>
92    
93     <p>
94     As you can see, it very much depends on what you want to achieve. Separate
95     partitions or volumes have the following advantages:
96     </p>
97    
98     <ul>
99     <li>
100 neysx 1.3 You can choose the best performing filesystem for each partition or volume
101 swift 1.1 </li>
102     <li>
103     Your entire system cannot run out of free space if one defunct tool is
104     continuously writing files to a partition or volume
105     </li>
106     <li>
107     If necessary, file system checks are reduced in time, as multiple checks can
108     be done in parallel (although this advantage is more with multiple disks than
109     it is with multiple partitions)
110     </li>
111     <li>
112     Security can be enhanced by mounting some partitions or volumes read-only,
113     nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored) etc.
114     </li>
115     </ul>
116    
117     <p>
118 swift 1.32 However, multiple partitions have disadvantages as well. If not configured
119     properly, you will have a system with lots of free space on one partition and
120     none on another. Another nuisance is that separate partitions - especially
121     for important mountpoints like <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> - often
122     require the administrator to boot with an initramfs to mount the partition
123     before other boot scripts start. This isn't always the case though, so YMMV.
124 swift 1.1 </p>
125    
126     </body>
127     </subsection>
128     </section>
129 swift 1.17 <section id="fdisk_SRM">
130 vapier 1.13 <title>Using fdisk to Partition your Disk (SRM only)</title>
131 swift 1.1 <subsection>
132     <body>
133    
134     <p>
135     The following parts explain how to create the example slice layout described
136     previously, namely:
137     </p>
138    
139     <table>
140     <tr>
141     <th>Slice</th>
142     <th>Description</th>
143     </tr>
144     <tr>
145 swift 1.5 <ti><path>/dev/sda1</path></ti>
146 swift 1.1 <ti>Swap slice</ti>
147     </tr>
148     <tr>
149 swift 1.5 <ti><path>/dev/sda2</path></ti>
150 swift 1.1 <ti>Root slice</ti>
151     </tr>
152     <tr>
153 swift 1.5 <ti><path>/dev/sda3</path></ti>
154 swift 1.1 <ti>Full disk (required)</ti>
155     </tr>
156     </table>
157    
158     <p>
159 neysx 1.9 Change your slice layout according to your own preference.
160 swift 1.1 </p>
161    
162    
163     </body>
164     </subsection>
165     <subsection>
166     <title>Identifying Available Disks</title>
167     <body>
168    
169     <p>
170     To figure out what disks you have running, use the following commands:
171     </p>
172    
173     <pre caption="Identifying available disks">
174 vapier 1.7 # <i>dmesg | grep 'drive$'</i> <comment>(For IDE disks)</comment>
175     # <i>dmesg | grep 'scsi'</i> <comment>(For SCSI disks)</comment>
176 swift 1.1 </pre>
177    
178     <p>
179     From this output you should be able to see what disks were detected and their
180     respective <path>/dev</path> entry. In the following parts we assume that the
181     disk is a SCSI disk on <path>/dev/sda</path>.
182     </p>
183    
184     <p>
185     Now fire up <c>fdisk</c>:
186     </p>
187    
188     <pre caption="Starting fdisk">
189     # <i>fdisk /dev/sda</i>
190     </pre>
191    
192     </body>
193     </subsection>
194     <subsection>
195     <title>Deleting All Slices</title>
196     <body>
197    
198     <p>
199 vapier 1.7 If your hard drive is completely blank, then you'll have to first create
200     a BSD disklabel.
201     </p>
202    
203 vapier 1.13 <pre caption="Creating a BSD disklabel">
204 vapier 1.7 Command (m for help): <i>b</i>
205     /dev/sda contains no disklabel.
206     Do you want to create a disklabel? (y/n) <i>y</i>
207     <comment>A bunch of drive-specific info will show here</comment>
208     3 partitions:
209     # start end size fstype [fsize bsize cpg]
210     c: 1 5290* 5289* unused 0 0
211     </pre>
212    
213     <p>
214 vapier 1.13 We start with deleting all slices <e>except</e> the 'c'-slice (a requirement
215     for using BSD disklabels). The following shows how to delete a slice (in
216     the example we use 'a'). Repeat the process to delete all other slices
217     (again, except the 'c'-slice).
218 swift 1.1 </p>
219    
220     <p>
221     Use <c>p</c> to view all existing slices. <c>d</c> is used to delete a slice.
222     </p>
223    
224     <pre caption="Deleting a slice">
225     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>p</i>
226    
227     8 partitions:
228     # start end size fstype [fsize bsize cpg]
229     a: 1 235* 234* 4.2BSD 1024 8192 16
230     b: 235* 469* 234* swap
231     c: 1 5290* 5289* unused 0 0
232     d: 469* 2076* 1607* unused 0 0
233     e: 2076* 3683* 1607* unused 0 0
234     f: 3683* 5290* 1607* unused 0 0
235     g: 469* 1749* 1280 4.2BSD 1024 8192 16
236     h: 1749* 5290* 3541* unused 0 0
237    
238     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>d</i>
239     Partition (a-h): <i>a</i>
240     </pre>
241    
242     <p>
243     After repeating this process for all slices, a listing should show you something
244     similar to this:
245     </p>
246    
247     <pre caption="Viewing an empty scheme">
248     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>p</i>
249    
250     3 partitions:
251     # start end size fstype [fsize bsize cpg]
252     c: 1 5290* 5289* unused 0 0
253     </pre>
254    
255     </body>
256     </subsection>
257     <subsection>
258     <title>Creating the Swap Slice</title>
259     <body>
260    
261     <p>
262 rane 1.30 On Alpha based systems you don't need a separate boot slice. However, the
263 swift 1.1 first cylinder cannot be used as the <c>aboot</c> image will be placed there.
264     </p>
265    
266     <p>
267     We will create a swap slice starting at the third cylinder, with a total
268 swift 1.15 size of 1 GB. Use <c>n</c> to create a new slice. After creating the slice,
269 vapier 1.8 we will change its type to <c>1</c> (one), meaning <e>swap</e>.
270 swift 1.1 </p>
271    
272     <pre caption="Creating the swap slice">
273     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>n</i>
274     Partition (a-p): <i>a</i>
275     First cylinder (1-5290, default 1): <i>3</i>
276     Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (3-5290, default 5290): <i>+1024M</i>
277    
278     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>t</i>
279     Partition (a-c): <i>a</i>
280     Hex code (type L to list codes): <i>1</i>
281     </pre>
282    
283     <p>
284     After these steps you should see a layout similar to the following:
285     </p>
286    
287     <pre caption="Slice layout after creating the swap slice">
288     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>p</i>
289    
290     3 partitions:
291     # start end size fstype [fsize bsize cpg]
292     a: 3 1003 1001 swap
293     c: 1 5290* 5289* unused 0 0
294     </pre>
295    
296     </body>
297     </subsection>
298     <subsection>
299     <title>Create the Root Slice</title>
300     <body>
301    
302     <p>
303     We will now create the root slice, starting from the first cylinder <e>after</e>
304     the swap slice. Use the <c>p</c> command to view where the swap slice ends. In
305 rane 1.30 our example, this is at 1003, making the root slice start at 1004.
306 swift 1.1 </p>
307    
308     <p>
309     Another problem is that there is currently a bug in <c>fdisk</c> making it think
310     the number of available cylinders is one above the real number of cylinders. In
311     other words, when you are asked for the last cylinder, decrease the cylinder
312     number (in this example: 5290) with one.
313     </p>
314    
315     <p>
316 rane 1.30 When the slice is created, we change the type to <c>8</c>, for <e>ext2</e>.
317 swift 1.1 </p>
318    
319     <pre caption="Creating the root slice">
320     D disklabel command (m for help): <i>n</i>
321     Partition (a-p): <i>b</i>
322     First cylinder (1-5290, default 1): <i>1004</i>
323     Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1004-5290, default 5290): <i>5289</i>
324    
325     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>t</i>
326     Partition (a-c): <i>b</i>
327     Hex code (type L to list codes): <i>8</i>
328     </pre>
329    
330     <p>
331     Your slice layout should now be similar to this:
332     </p>
333    
334     <pre caption="Viewing the slice layout">
335     BSD disklabel command (m for help): <i>p</i>
336    
337     3 partitions:
338     # start end size fstype [fsize bsize cpg]
339     a: 3 1003 1001 swap
340     b: 1004 5289 4286 ext2
341     c: 1 5290* 5289* unused 0 0
342     </pre>
343    
344     </body>
345     </subsection>
346     <subsection>
347     <title>Save the Slice Layout and Exit</title>
348     <body>
349    
350     <p>
351     Save <c>fdisk</c> by typing <c>w</c>. This will also save your slice layout.
352     </p>
353    
354     <pre caption="Save and exit fdisk">
355     Command (m for help): <i>w</i>
356     </pre>
357    
358     <p>
359 nightmorph 1.29 Now that your slices are created, you can continue with <uri
360 swift 1.1 link="#filesystems">Creating Filesystems</uri>.
361     </p>
362    
363     </body>
364     </subsection>
365     </section>
366 swift 1.17 <section id="fdisk_ARC">
367 vapier 1.13 <title>Using fdisk to Partition your Disk (ARC/AlphaBIOS only)</title>
368     <subsection>
369     <body>
370    
371     <p>
372     The following parts explain how to partition the disk with a layout
373     similar to the one described previously, namely:
374     </p>
375    
376     <table>
377     <tr>
378     <th>Partition</th>
379     <th>Description</th>
380     </tr>
381     <tr>
382     <ti><path>/dev/sda1</path></ti>
383     <ti>Boot partition</ti>
384     </tr>
385     <tr>
386     <ti><path>/dev/sda2</path></ti>
387     <ti>Swap partition</ti>
388     </tr>
389     <tr>
390     <ti><path>/dev/sda3</path></ti>
391     <ti>Root partition</ti>
392     </tr>
393     </table>
394    
395     <p>
396     Change your partition layout according to your own preference.
397     </p>
398    
399     </body>
400     </subsection>
401     <subsection>
402     <title>Identifying Available Disks</title>
403     <body>
404    
405     <p>
406     To figure out what disks you have running, use the following commands:
407     </p>
408    
409     <pre caption="Identifying available disks">
410     # <i>dmesg | grep 'drive$'</i> <comment>(For IDE disks)</comment>
411     # <i>dmesg | grep 'scsi'</i> <comment>(For SCSI disks)</comment>
412     </pre>
413    
414     <p>
415     From this output you should be able to see what disks were detected and their
416     respective <path>/dev</path> entry. In the following parts we assume that the
417     disk is a SCSI disk on <path>/dev/sda</path>.
418     </p>
419    
420     <p>
421     Now fire up <c>fdisk</c>:
422     </p>
423    
424     <pre caption="Starting fdisk">
425     # <i>fdisk /dev/sda</i>
426     </pre>
427    
428     </body>
429     </subsection>
430     <subsection>
431     <title>Deleting All Partitions</title>
432     <body>
433    
434     <p>
435     If your hard drive is completely blank, then you'll have to first create
436     a DOS disklabel.
437     </p>
438    
439     <pre caption="Creating a DOS disklabel">
440     Command (m for help): <i>o</i>
441     Building a new DOS disklabel.
442     </pre>
443    
444     <p>
445     We start with deleting all partitions. The following shows how to delete
446     a partition (in the example we use '1'). Repeat the process to delete all
447     other partitions.
448     </p>
449    
450     <p>
451 cam 1.14 Use <c>p</c> to view all existing partitions. <c>d</c> is used to delete a
452     partition.
453 vapier 1.13 </p>
454    
455     <pre caption="Deleting a partition">
456     command (m for help): <i>p</i>
457    
458     Disk /dev/sda: 9150 MB, 9150996480 bytes
459     64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 8727 cylinders
460     Units = cylinders of 2048 * 512 = 1048576 bytes
461    
462     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
463     /dev/sda1 1 478 489456 83 Linux
464     /dev/sda2 479 8727 8446976 5 Extended
465     /dev/sda5 479 1433 977904 83 Linux Swap
466     /dev/sda6 1434 8727 7469040 83 Linux
467    
468     command (m for help): <i>d</i>
469     Partition number (1-6): <i>1</i>
470     </pre>
471    
472    
473     </body>
474     </subsection>
475     <subsection>
476     <title>Creating the Boot Partition</title>
477     <body>
478    
479     <p>
480     On Alpha systems which use MILO to boot, we have to create a small vfat
481     boot partition.
482     </p>
483    
484     <pre caption="Creating the boot partition">
485     Command (m for help): <i>n</i>
486     Command action
487     e extended
488     p primary partition (1-4)
489     <i>p</i>
490     Partition number (1-4): <i>1</i>
491     First cylinder (1-8727, default 1): <i>1</i>
492     Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1-8727, default 8727): <i>+16M</i>
493    
494     Command (m for help): <i>t</i>
495     Selected partition 1
496     Hex code (type L to list codes): <i>6</i>
497     Changed system type of partition 1 to 6 (FAT16)
498     </pre>
499    
500     </body>
501     </subsection>
502     <subsection>
503     <title>Creating the Swap Partition</title>
504     <body>
505    
506     <p>
507 rane 1.30 We will create a swap partition with a total size of 1 GB. Use <c>n</c> to
508     create a new partition.
509 vapier 1.13 </p>
510    
511     <pre caption="Creating the swap partition">
512     Command (m for help): <i>n</i>
513     Command action
514     e extended
515     p primary partition (1-4)
516     <i>p</i>
517     Partition number (1-4): <i>2</i>
518     First cylinder (17-8727, default 17): <i>17</i>
519     Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (17-8727, default 8727): <i>+1000M</i>
520    
521     Command (m for help): <i>t</i>
522 neysx 1.27 Partition number (1-4): <i>2</i>
523 vapier 1.13 Hex code (type L to list codes): <i>82</i>
524     Changed system type of partition 2 to 82 (Linux swap)
525     </pre>
526    
527     <p>
528     After these steps you should see a layout similar to the following:
529     </p>
530    
531     <pre caption="Partition listing after creating a swap partition">
532     Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
533    
534     Disk /dev/sda: 9150 MB, 9150996480 bytes
535     64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 8727 cylinders
536     Units = cylinders of 2048 * 512 = 1048576 bytes
537    
538     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
539     /dev/sda1 1 16 16368 6 FAT16
540     /dev/sda2 17 971 977920 82 Linux swap
541     </pre>
542    
543     </body>
544     </subsection>
545     <subsection>
546     <title>Creating the Root Partition</title>
547     <body>
548    
549     <p>
550     We will now create the root partition. Again, just use the <c>n</c> command.
551     </p>
552    
553     <pre caption="Creating the root partition">
554     Command (m for help): <i>n</i>
555     Command action
556     e extended
557     p primary partition (1-4)
558     <i>p</i>
559     Partition number (1-4): <i>3</i>
560     First cylinder (972-8727, default 972): <i>972</i>
561     Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (972-8727, default 8727): <i>8727</i>
562     </pre>
563    
564     <p>
565     After these steps you should see a layout similar to the following:
566     </p>
567    
568     <pre caption="Partition listing after creating the root partition">
569     Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
570    
571     Disk /dev/sda: 9150 MB, 9150996480 bytes
572     64 heads, 32 sectors/track, 8727 cylinders
573     Units = cylinders of 2048 * 512 = 1048576 bytes
574    
575     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
576     /dev/sda1 1 16 16368 6 FAT16
577     /dev/sda2 17 971 977920 82 Linux swap
578     /dev/sda3 972 8727 7942144 83 Linux
579     </pre>
580    
581     </body>
582     </subsection>
583     <subsection>
584     <title>Save the Partition Layout and Exit</title>
585     <body>
586    
587     <p>
588     Save <c>fdisk</c> by typing <c>w</c>. This will also save your partition layout.
589     </p>
590    
591     <pre caption="Save and exit fdisk">
592     Command (m for help): <i>w</i>
593     </pre>
594    
595     <p>
596 nightmorph 1.29 Now that your partitions are created, you can continue with <uri
597 vapier 1.13 link="#filesystems">Creating Filesystems</uri>.
598     </p>
599    
600     </body>
601     </subsection>
602     </section>
603 swift 1.1 <section id="filesystems">
604     <title>Creating Filesystems</title>
605     <subsection>
606     <title>Introduction</title>
607     <body>
608    
609     <p>
610     Now that your partitions are created, it is time to place a filesystem on them.
611     If you don't care about what filesystem to choose and are happy with what we use
612     as default in this handbook, continue with <uri
613     link="#filesystems-apply">Applying a Filesystem to a Partition</uri>.
614     Otherwise read on to learn about the available filesystems...
615     </p>
616    
617     </body>
618     </subsection>
619 nightmorph 1.28
620 swift 1.1 <subsection>
621 nightmorph 1.28 <include href="hb-install-filesystems.xml"/>
622     </subsection>
623 swift 1.1
624     <subsection id="filesystems-apply">
625     <title>Applying a Filesystem to a Partition</title>
626     <body>
627    
628     <p>
629     To create a filesystem on a partition or volume, there are tools available for
630     each possible filesystem:
631     </p>
632    
633     <table>
634     <tr>
635     <th>Filesystem</th>
636     <th>Creation Command</th>
637     </tr>
638     <tr>
639     <ti>ext2</ti>
640 swift 1.31 <ti><c>mkfs.ext2</c></ti>
641 swift 1.1 </tr>
642     <tr>
643     <ti>ext3</ti>
644 swift 1.31 <ti><c>mkfs.ext3</c></ti>
645     </tr>
646     <tr>
647     <ti>ext4</ti>
648     <ti><c>mkfs.ext4</c></ti>
649 swift 1.1 </tr>
650     <tr>
651     <ti>reiserfs</ti>
652 swift 1.31 <ti><c>mkfs.reiserfs</c></ti>
653 swift 1.1 </tr>
654     <tr>
655     <ti>xfs</ti>
656     <ti><c>mkfs.xfs</c></ti>
657     </tr>
658     <tr>
659     <ti>jfs</ti>
660     <ti><c>mkfs.jfs</c></ti>
661     </tr>
662     </table>
663    
664     <p>
665 swift 1.5 For instance, to have the root partition (<path>/dev/sda2</path> in our example)
666 swift 1.1 in ext3, you would use:
667     </p>
668    
669     <pre caption="Applying a filesystem on a partition">
670 swift 1.31 # <i>mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda2</i>
671 swift 1.1 </pre>
672    
673     <p>
674     Now create the filesystems on your newly created partitions (or logical
675     volumes).
676     </p>
677    
678     </body>
679     </subsection>
680     <subsection>
681     <title>Activating the Swap Partition</title>
682     <body>
683    
684     <p>
685     <c>mkswap</c> is the command that is used to initialize swap partitions:
686     </p>
687    
688     <pre caption="Creating a Swap signature">
689 swift 1.5 # <i>mkswap /dev/sda1</i>
690 swift 1.1 </pre>
691    
692     <p>
693     To activate the swap partition, use <c>swapon</c>:
694     </p>
695    
696     <pre caption="Activating the swap partition">
697 swift 1.5 # <i>swapon /dev/sda1</i>
698 swift 1.1 </pre>
699    
700     <p>
701 swift 1.16 Create and activate the swap with the commands mentioned above.
702 swift 1.1 </p>
703    
704     </body>
705     </subsection>
706     </section>
707     <section>
708     <title>Mounting</title>
709     <body>
710    
711     <p>
712     Now that your partitions are initialized and are housing a filesystem, it is
713     time to mount those partitions. Use the <c>mount</c> command. Don't forget to
714     create the necessary mount directories for every partition you created. As an
715 rane 1.30 example we mount the root partition:
716 swift 1.1 </p>
717    
718     <pre caption="Mounting partitions">
719 swift 1.5 # <i>mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/gentoo</i>
720 swift 1.1 </pre>
721    
722     <note>
723     If you want your <path>/tmp</path> to reside on a separate partition, be sure to
724     change its permissions after mounting: <c>chmod 1777 /mnt/gentoo/tmp</c>. This
725     also holds for <path>/var/tmp</path>.
726     </note>
727    
728     <p>
729 swift 1.6 We will also have to mount the proc filesystem (a virtual interface with the
730     kernel) on <path>/proc</path>. But first we will need to place our files on the partitions.
731 swift 1.1 </p>
732    
733     <p>
734 swift 1.6 Continue with <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=5">Installing the Gentoo
735 swift 1.1 Installation Files</uri>.
736     </p>
737    
738     </body>
739     </section>
740     </sections>

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