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Revision 1.11 - (hide annotations) (download) (as text)
Tue May 17 22:33:01 2011 UTC (3 years, 4 months ago) by nightmorph
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Changes since 1.10: +10 -3 lines
File MIME type: application/xml
some initial fixes of the ARM stuff

1 vapier 1.1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2     <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3    
4     <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 vapier 1.6 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6 vapier 1.1
7 nightmorph 1.11 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-arm-medium.xml,v 1.10 2010/07/19 05:59:23 nightmorph Exp $ -->
8 vapier 1.1
9     <sections>
10 swift 1.3
11 nightmorph 1.11 <version>10</version>
12     <date>2011-05-17</date>
13 swift 1.3
14 vapier 1.1 <section>
15     <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
16     <subsection>
17     <title>Introduction</title>
18     <body>
19    
20     <p>
21     Before we start, we first list what hardware requirements you need to
22     successfully install Gentoo on your box.
23     </p>
24    
25     </body>
26     </subsection>
27     <subsection>
28 vapier 1.6 <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
29 vapier 1.1 <body>
30    
31 vapier 1.6 <p>
32     Generally if you have an ARMv4 or later, it can run Gentoo. This is pretty
33 nightmorph 1.8 much a given, so below we'll cover the CPUs that have actually been tested.
34 vapier 1.6 </p>
35    
36     <table>
37     <tr>
38 vapier 1.7 <th>CPU <e>(Big Endian)</e></th>
39 vapier 1.6 <ti>IXP425</ti>
40     </tr>
41     <tr>
42 vapier 1.7 <th>CPU <e>(Little Endian)</e></th>
43 vapier 1.6 <ti>IXP425, StrongARM-110</ti>
44     </tr>
45     <tr>
46     <th>Memory</th>
47     <ti>32 MB</ti>
48     </tr>
49     <tr>
50     <th>Diskspace</th>
51     <ti>1.5 GB (excluding swap space)</ti>
52     </tr>
53     <tr>
54     <th>Swap space</th>
55     <ti>At least 256 MB</ti>
56     </tr>
57     </table>
58 vapier 1.1
59     </body>
60     </subsection>
61     </section>
62 vapier 1.6
63 vapier 1.1 <section>
64 vapier 1.6 <title>Installation Notes</title>
65 vapier 1.1 <subsection>
66 nightmorph 1.8 <title>A note about ABIs</title>
67 vapier 1.1 <body>
68    
69     <p>
70 nightmorph 1.10 We support the new ARM EABI as well as the classic ARM ABI, sometimes referred
71     to as the Legacy or Old ABI (which is required for some old ARM chips like
72     armv4l). Thumb may not be as well tested, but in theory it should work. Feel
73     free to help out.
74 vapier 1.1 </p>
75    
76     <p>
77 vapier 1.6 Also, another important concept to grasp is the concept of <b>endianness</b>.
78 nightmorph 1.8 Endianness refers to the way that a CPU reads words from main memory. A word can
79     be read as either <e>big</e> endian (most significant byte first), or
80 vapier 1.6 <e>little</e> endian (least significant byte first). Intel x86 machines are
81 nightmorph 1.8 generally Little Endian, whilst Apple and Sparc machines are Big Endian. On ARM,
82     they can be either. To separate them, we append <c>eb</c> to the architecture
83     name to denote big endian as little endian tends to be more common in practice.
84 vapier 1.1 </p>
85    
86 vapier 1.6 </body>
87     </subsection>
88     <subsection>
89     <title>The Stage3 Tarball</title>
90     <body>
91 vapier 1.1
92     <p>
93 vapier 1.6 A stage3 tarball is an archive containing a minimal Gentoo environment,
94     suitable to continue the Gentoo installation using the instructions in this
95     manual. Previously, the Gentoo Handbook described the installation using one of
96     three stage tarballs. While Gentoo still offers stage1 and stage2 tarballs,
97     the official installation method uses the stage3 tarball. If you are interested
98     in performing a Gentoo installation using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, please
99     read the Gentoo FAQ on <uri link="/doc/en/faq.xml#stage12">How do I Install
100     Gentoo Using a Stage1 or Stage2 Tarball?</uri>
101 vapier 1.1 </p>
102    
103 nightmorph 1.11 <p>
104     Stage3 tarballs can be downloaded from <path><keyval
105     id="release-dir"/>current-stage3/</path> on any of the <uri
106     link="/main/en/mirrors.xml">Official Gentoo Mirrors</uri> and are not provided
107     on the LiveCD.
108     </p>
109    
110 vapier 1.1 </body>
111     </subsection>
112 vapier 1.6 </section>
113    
114     <section>
115     <title>Netbooting Overview</title>
116 vapier 1.1 <subsection>
117     <body>
118    
119     <p>
120 vapier 1.6 In this section, we'll cover what you need in order to successfully network
121     boot a NetWinder. This is just a brief guide, it is not intended to be
122     thorough, for more information it is recommended that you read the <uri
123     link="/doc/en/diskless-howto.xml">Diskless HOWTO</uri>.
124 vapier 1.1 </p>
125    
126     <p>
127 vapier 1.6 What You Need: Depending on the machine, there is a certain amount of hardware
128     that you'll need in order to successfully netboot and install Linux.
129 vapier 1.1 </p>
130    
131 vapier 1.6 <ul>
132     <li>
133     In General:
134     <ul>
135     <li>TFTP server</li>
136     <li>Patience -- and lots of it</li>
137     </ul>
138     </li>
139     <li>
140 vapier 1.7 NetWinders: you can either do a serial console with a null-modem
141 vapier 1.6 cable, or you can hook up a regular VGA monitor and a PS/2 keyboard.
142     </li>
143     </ul>
144    
145     <note>
146     A <uri link="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_modem">null modem cable</uri>
147     can be found in most electronics stores.
148     </note>
149    
150     <note>
151     For the terminal, this could be a real VT100/ANSI terminal, or it could be a PC
152     running terminal emulation software (such as HyperTerminal, Minicom, seyon,
153     Telex, xc, screen -- whatever your preference). It doesn't matter what platform
154     this machine runs -- just so long as it has one RS-232 serial port you can use,
155     and appropriate software.
156     </note>
157    
158     </body>
159     </subsection>
160     <subsection>
161     <title>Setting up TFTP -- a brief guide</title>
162     <body>
163    
164 vapier 1.1 <p>
165 vapier 1.6 Okay, so you've got your bits and pieces together, now to set everything up. As
166     mentioned earlier -- this is not a complete guide, this is a bare-bones config
167     that will just get things rolling. You can either use this when starting a
168     setup from scratch, or use the suggestions to amend your existing setup to
169     support netbooting.
170 vapier 1.1 </p>
171    
172     <p>
173 vapier 1.6 It is worth noting that the servers used need not be running Gentoo Linux, you
174     could quite reasonably use FreeBSD or any Unix-like platform. However, this
175     guide will assume you are running Gentoo Linux. You also may run TFTP/NFS on a
176     separate machine to the DHCP server if desired.
177 vapier 1.1 </p>
178    
179 vapier 1.6 <warn>
180     The Gentoo/ARM Team cannot help you with setting up other operating systems as
181     netboot servers. If you choose a different OS, it is assumed you know what
182     you're doing.
183     </warn>
184 vapier 1.1
185     <p>
186 vapier 1.6 First step -- setting up the TFTP server. It is recommended that you use
187     <c>tftp-hpa</c> as it is the only TFTP daemon known to work correctly. Proceed
188     by installing it as shown below.
189 vapier 1.1 </p>
190    
191 vapier 1.6 <pre caption="Installing tftp-hpa">
192     # <i>emerge net-ftp/tftp-hpa</i>
193     </pre>
194    
195 vapier 1.1 <p>
196 vapier 1.6 This will create <path>/tftproot</path> for you to store the netboot images.
197     You may move this elsewhere if you wish. For the purposes of this guide, it is
198     assumed that you have left it in the default location.
199 vapier 1.1 </p>
200    
201 vapier 1.6 </body>
202     </subsection>
203     </section>
204     <section>
205     <title>Netbooting your ARM Machine</title>
206     <subsection>
207     <title>Downloading a Netboot image</title>
208     <body>
209 vapier 1.1
210     <p>
211 vapier 1.6 Depending on the system you're installing for, there are several possible
212     images available for download. These are all labelled according to the system
213     type and CPU they are compiled for. The machine types are as follows:
214 vapier 1.1 </p>
215    
216     <table>
217 vapier 1.6 <tr>
218     <th>Machine</th>
219     <th>Files</th>
220     </tr>
221     <tr>
222     <ti>NetWinder</ti>
223     <ti><uri link="http://dev.gentoo.org/~vapier/arm/netboot-netwinder">Netboot</uri></ti>
224     </tr>
225 vapier 1.1 </table>
226    
227     <p>
228 vapier 1.6 Make sure to place the image into your <path>/tftproot</path> directory.
229 vapier 1.1 </p>
230    
231     </body>
232     </subsection>
233     <subsection>
234 vapier 1.6 <title>Start Your Daemons...</title>
235 vapier 1.1 <body>
236     <p>
237 vapier 1.6 At this point, you should be ready to start the daemons. Enter the following:
238 vapier 1.1 </p>
239    
240 vapier 1.6 <pre caption="Starting the TFTP daemons">
241     # <i>/etc/init.d/in.tftpd start</i>
242     </pre>
243 vapier 1.1
244     <p>
245 vapier 1.6 If nothing went wrong in that last step you should be all set to power on the
246     ARM machine and proceed with the guide. Note that below we assume the TFTP
247     server has the IP <c>192.168.0.2</c> so you may have to change this for your
248     setup.
249 vapier 1.1 </p>
250    
251     <p>
252 vapier 1.6 An easy way to verify if the tftp daemon is running is to type the following
253     command -- if you see something like the output mentioned below -- everything
254     is fine.
255 vapier 1.1 </p>
256    
257 vapier 1.6 <pre caption="Checking TFTPd is running">
258     # <i>netstat -al | grep ^udp</i>
259     udp 0 0 *:bootpc *:*
260     udp 0 0 *:631 *:*
261     udp 0 0 *:xdmcp *:*
262     udp 0 0 *:tftp *:* <comment>&lt;-- (look for this line)</comment>
263 vapier 1.1 </pre>
264    
265 vapier 1.6 </body>
266     </subsection>
267     <subsection>
268     <title>Netbooting the NetWinder</title>
269     <body>
270    
271 vapier 1.1 <p>
272 vapier 1.6 Okay, everything is set, the TFTP server is up and running. Now it is time to
273     fire up the NetWinder. Once you get into the NeTTrom console, enter the
274     commands below.
275     </p>
276 vapier 1.1
277 vapier 1.6 <pre caption="Netbooting from NeTTrom">
278     NeTTrom> <i>setenv kernconfig tftp</i>
279     NeTTrom> <i>setenv kerntftpserver 192.168.0.2</i>
280     NeTTrom> <i>setenv kerntftpfile netboot-netwinder</i>
281     NeTTrom> <i>setenv netconfig_eth0 flash</i>
282     NeTTrom> <i>setenv eth0_ip 192.168.0.15/24</i>
283     NeTTrom> <i>boot</i>
284 vapier 1.1 </pre>
285    
286     <p>
287 vapier 1.6 From this point, the machine should start downloading the image, then, roughly
288     20 seconds later, start booting Linux. If all is well, you should be dropped at
289     the Busybox <c>ash</c> shell, where you can move on to <uri
290     link="?part=1&amp;chap=3">Configuring Your Network</uri>.
291 vapier 1.1 </p>
292    
293     </body>
294     </subsection>
295     </section>
296 vapier 1.6
297 vapier 1.1 </sections>

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