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1<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?> 1<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd"> 2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3 3
4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license --> 4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5<!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/1.0 --> 5<!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6 6
7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-config.xml,v 1.66 2005/06/19 11:25:21 swift Exp $ --> 7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-config.xml,v 1.76 2006/03/28 10:35:59 neysx Exp $ -->
8 8
9<sections> 9<sections>
10 10
11<version>2.8</version> 11<version>2.18</version>
12<date>2005-06-19</date> 12<date>2006-03-28</date>
13 13
14<section> 14<section>
15<title>Filesystem Information</title> 15<title>Filesystem Information</title>
16<subsection> 16<subsection>
17<title>What is fstab?</title> 17<title>What is fstab?</title>
78</pre> 78</pre>
79 79
80<p> 80<p>
81Let us take a look at how we write down the options for the <path>/boot</path> 81Let us take a look at how we write down the options for the <path>/boot</path>
82partition. This is just an example, so if your architecture doesn't require a 82partition. This is just an example, so if your architecture doesn't require a
83<path>/boot</path> partition (such as <b>PPC</b>), don't copy it verbatim. 83<path>/boot</path> partition (such as Apple <b>PPC</b> machines), don't copy it
84verbatim.
84</p> 85</p>
85 86
86<p> 87<p>
87In our default x86 partitioning example <path>/boot</path> is the 88In our default x86 partitioning example <path>/boot</path> is the
88<path>/dev/hda1</path> partition, with <c>ext2</c> as filesystem. 89<path>/dev/hda1</path> partition, with <c>ext2</c> as filesystem.
208 209
209<comment>(Set the NISDOMAIN variable to your NIS domain name)</comment> 210<comment>(Set the NISDOMAIN variable to your NIS domain name)</comment>
210NISDOMAIN="<i>my-nisdomain</i>" 211NISDOMAIN="<i>my-nisdomain</i>"
211</pre> 212</pre>
212 213
213<p>
214Now add the <c>domainname</c> script to the default runlevel:
215</p>
216
217<pre caption="Adding domainname to the default runlevel">
218# <i>rc-update add domainname default</i>
219</pre>
220
221</body> 214</body>
222</subsection> 215</subsection>
223<subsection> 216<subsection>
224<title>Configuring your Network</title> 217<title>Configuring your Network</title>
225<body> 218<body>
226 219
227<p> 220<p>
228Before you get that "Hey, we've had that already"-feeling, you should remember 221Before you get that "Hey, we've had that already"-feeling, you should remember
229that the networking you set up in the beginning of the gentoo installation was 222that the networking you set up in the beginning of the Gentoo installation was
230just for the installation. Right now you are going to configure networking for 223just for the installation. Right now you are going to configure networking for
231your Gentoo system permanently. 224your Gentoo system permanently.
232</p> 225</p>
233 226
234<note> 227<note>
235More detailed information about networking, including advanced topics like 228More detailed information about networking, including advanced topics like
236bonding, bridging, 802.11q VLANs or wireless networking is covered in the <uri 229bonding, bridging, 802.1Q VLANs or wireless networking is covered in the <uri
237link="?part=4">Gentoo Network Configuration</uri> section. 230link="?part=4">Gentoo Network Configuration</uri> section.
238</note> 231</note>
239 232
240<p> 233<p>
241All networking information is gathered in <path>/etc/conf.d/net</path>. It uses 234All networking information is gathered in <path>/etc/conf.d/net</path>. It uses
242a straightforward yet not intuitive syntax if you don't know how to set up 235a straightforward yet not intuitive syntax if you don't know how to set up
243networking manually. But don't fear, we'll explain everything :) 236networking manually. But don't fear, we'll explain everything. A fully
244</p> 237commented example that covers many different configurations is available in
245 238<path>/etc/conf.d/net.example</path>.
246<p> 239</p>
240
241<p>
242DHCP is used by default and does not require any further configuration.
243</p>
244
245<p>
246If you need to configure your network connection either because you need
247specific DHCP options or because you do not use DHCP at all, open
247First open <path>/etc/conf.d/net</path> with your favorite editor (<c>nano</c> 248<path>/etc/conf.d/net</path> with your favorite editor (<c>nano</c> is used in
248is used in this example): 249this example):
249</p> 250</p>
250 251
251<pre caption="Opening /etc/conf.d/net for editing"> 252<pre caption="Opening /etc/conf.d/net for editing">
252# <i>nano -w /etc/conf.d/net</i> 253# <i>nano -w /etc/conf.d/net</i>
253</pre> 254</pre>
254 255
255<p> 256<p>
256The first variable you'll find is called <c>config_eth0</c>. As you can probably 257You will see the following file:
257imagine, this variable configured the eth0 network interface. If the interface 258</p>
258needs to automatically obtain an IP address through DHCP, you should set it 259
259like so: 260<pre caption="Default /etc/conf.d/net">
261# This blank configuration will automatically use DHCP for any net.*
262# scripts in /etc/init.d. To create a more complete configuration,
263# please review /etc/conf.d/net.example and save your configuration
264# in /etc/conf.d/net (this file :]!).
265</pre>
266
267<p>
268To enter your own IP address, netmask and gateway, you need
269to set both <c>config_eth0</c> and <c>routes_eth0</c>:
270</p>
271
272<pre caption="Manually setting IP information for eth0">
273config_eth0=( "192.168.0.2 netmask 255.255.255.0 brd 192.168.0.255" )
274routes_eth0=( "default gw 192.168.0.1" )
275</pre>
276
277<p>
278To use DHCP and add specific DHCP options, define <c>config_eth0</c> and
279<c>dhcp_eth0</c>:
260</p> 280</p>
261 281
262<pre caption="Automatically obtaining an IP address for eth0"> 282<pre caption="Automatically obtaining an IP address for eth0">
263config_eth0=( "dhcp" ) 283config_eth0=( "dhcp" )
284dhcp_eth0="nodns nontp nonis"
264</pre> 285</pre>
265 286
266<p>
267However, if you have to enter your own IP address, netmask and gateway, you need
268to set both <c>config_eth0</c> and <c>routes_eth0</c>:
269</p> 287<p>
270 288Please read <path>/etc/conf.d/net.example</path> for a list of all available
271<pre caption="Manually setting IP information for eth0"> 289options.
272config_eth0=( "192.168.0.2 netmask 255.255.255.0" )
273routes_eth0=( "default gw 192.168.0.1" )
274</pre> 290</p>
275 291
276<p> 292<p>
277If you have several network interfaces repeat the above steps for 293If you have several network interfaces repeat the above steps for
278<c>config_eth1</c>, <c>config_eth2</c>, etc. 294<c>config_eth1</c>, <c>config_eth2</c>, etc.
279</p> 295</p>
426<pre caption="Opening /etc/rc.conf"> 442<pre caption="Opening /etc/rc.conf">
427# <i>nano -w /etc/rc.conf</i> 443# <i>nano -w /etc/rc.conf</i>
428</pre> 444</pre>
429 445
430<p> 446<p>
447When you're finished configuring <path>/etc/rc.conf</path>, save and exit.
448</p>
449
450<p>
431As you can see, this file is well commented to help you set up the necessary 451As you can see, this file is well commented to help you set up the necessary
432configuration variables. Take special care with the <c>KEYMAP</c> setting: if 452configuration variables. You can configure your system to use unicode and
433you select the wrong <c>KEYMAP</c> you will get weird results when typing on 453define your default editor and your display manager (like gdm or kdm).
434your keyboard. 454</p>
455
456<p>
457Gentoo uses <path>/etc/conf.d/keymaps</path> to handle keyboard configuration.
458Edit it to configure your keyboard.
459</p>
460
461<pre caption="Opening /etc/conf.d/keymaps">
462# <i>nano -w /etc/conf.d/keymaps</i>
463</pre>
464
465<p>
466Take special care with the <c>KEYMAP</c> variable. If you select the wrong
467<c>KEYMAP</c>, you will get weird results when typing on your keyboard.
435</p> 468</p>
436 469
437<note> 470<note>
438Users of USB-based <b>SPARC</b> systems and <b>SPARC</b> clones might need to 471Users of USB-based <b>SPARC</b> systems and <b>SPARC</b> clones might need to
439select an i386 keymap (such as "us") instead of "sunkeymap". 472select an i386 keymap (such as "us") instead of "sunkeymap". <b>PPC</b> uses x86
473keymaps on most systems. Users who want to be able to use ADB keymaps on boot
474have to enable ADB keycode sendings in their kernel and have to set a mac/ppc
475keymap in <path>/etc/conf.d/keymaps</path>.
440</note> 476</note>
441 477
442<p> 478<p>
443<b>PPC</b> uses x86 keymaps on most systems. Users who want to be able to use 479When you're finished configuring <path>/etc/conf.d/keymaps</path>, save and
444ADB keymaps on boot have to enable ADB keycode sendings in their kernel and have 480exit.
445to set a mac/ppc keymap in <path>rc.conf</path>. 481</p>
482
446</p> 483<p>
484Gentoo uses <path>/etc/conf.d/clock</path> to set clock options. Edit it
485according to your needs.
486</p>
487
488<pre caption="Opening /etc/conf.d/clock">
489# <i>nano -w /etc/conf.d/clock</i>
490</pre>
447 491
448<p> 492<p>
449If your hardware clock is not using UTC, you need to add <c>CLOCK="local"</c> to 493If your hardware clock is not using UTC, you need to add <c>CLOCK="local"</c> to
450the file. Otherwise you will notice some clock skew. 494the file. Otherwise you will notice some clock skew. Furthermore, Windows
451</p> 495assumes that your hardware clock uses local time, so if you want to dualboot,
452 496you should set this variable appropriately, otherwise your clock will go crazy.
453<p> 497</p>
498
499<p>
454When you're finished configuring <path>/etc/rc.conf</path>, save and exit. 500When you're finished configuring <path>/etc/conf.d/clock</path>, save and
455</p> 501exit.
456
457<p> 502</p>
503
504<p>
458If you are not installing Gentoo on an IBM POWER5 or JS20 system, continue with 505If you are not installing Gentoo on IBM PPC64 hardware, continue with
459<uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=9">Installing Necessary System Tools</uri>. 506<uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=9">Installing Necessary System Tools</uri>.
460</p> 507</p>
461 508
462</body> 509</body>
463</subsection> 510</subsection>
464<subsection> 511<subsection>
465<title>Configuring the Console</title> 512<title>Configuring the Console</title>
466<body> 513<body>
467 514
468<note> 515<note>
469The following section applies to the IBM POWER5 and JS20 hardware platforms. 516The following section applies to the IBM PPC64 hardware platforms.
470</note> 517</note>
471 518
472<p> 519<p>
473If you are running Gentoo in an LPAR or on a JS20 blade, you must uncomment 520If you are running Gentoo on IBM PPC64 hardware and using a virtual console
474the hvc line in /etc/inittab for the virtual console to spawn a login prompt. 521you must uncomment the appropriate line in <path>/etc/inittab</path> for the
522virtual console to spawn a login prompt.
475</p> 523</p>
476 524
477<pre caption="Enabling hvc support in /etc/inittab"> 525<pre caption="Enabling hvc or hvsi support in /etc/inittab">
478hvc:12345:respawn:/sbin/agetty -nl /bin/bashlogin 9600 hvc0 vt220 526hvc0:12345:respawn:/sbin/agetty -L 9600 hvc0
527hvsi:12345:respawn:/sbin/agetty -L 19200 hvsi0
528</pre>
529
530<p>
531You should also take this time to verify that the appropriate console is
532listed in <path>/etc/securetty</path>.
479</pre> 533</p>
480 534
481<p> 535<p>
482You may now continue with <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=9">Installing Necessary 536You may now continue with <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=9">Installing Necessary
483System Tools</uri>. 537System Tools</uri>.
484</p> 538</p>

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