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2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd"> 2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3 3
4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license --> 4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5<!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 --> 5<!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6 6
7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-config.xml,v 1.71 2005/08/13 21:03:21 jkt Exp $ --> 7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-config.xml,v 1.78 2006/05/27 13:02:15 neysx Exp $ -->
8 8
9<sections> 9<sections>
10 10
11<version>2.12</version> 11<version>2.19</version>
12<date>2005-08-13</date> 12<date>2006-05-27</date>
13 13
14<section> 14<section>
15<title>Filesystem Information</title> 15<title>Filesystem Information</title>
16<subsection> 16<subsection>
17<title>What is fstab?</title> 17<title>What is fstab?</title>
66 (or <c>0</c> if a filesystem check isn't necessary). 66 (or <c>0</c> if a filesystem check isn't necessary).
67</li> 67</li>
68</ul> 68</ul>
69 69
70<p> 70<p>
71The default <path>/etc/fstab</path> file provided by Gentoo <e>is no valid fstab 71The default <path>/etc/fstab</path> file provided by Gentoo <e>is not a valid
72file</e>, so start <c>nano</c> (or your favorite editor) to create your 72fstab file</e>, so start <c>nano</c> (or your favorite editor) to create your
73<path>/etc/fstab</path>: 73<path>/etc/fstab</path>:
74</p> 74</p>
75 75
76<pre caption="Opening /etc/fstab"> 76<pre caption="Opening /etc/fstab">
77# <i>nano -w /etc/fstab</i> 77# <i>nano -w /etc/fstab</i>
78</pre> 78</pre>
79 79
80<p> 80<p>
81Let us take a look at how we write down the options for the <path>/boot</path> 81Let us take a look at how we write down the options for the <path>/boot</path>
82partition. This is just an example, so if your architecture doesn't require a 82partition. This is just an example, so if your architecture doesn't require a
83<path>/boot</path> partition (such as <b>PPC</b>), don't copy it verbatim. 83<path>/boot</path> partition (such as Apple <b>PPC</b> machines), don't copy it
84verbatim.
84</p> 85</p>
85 86
86<p> 87<p>
87In our default x86 partitioning example <path>/boot</path> is the 88In our default x86 partitioning example <path>/boot</path> is the
88<path>/dev/hda1</path> partition, with <c>ext2</c> as filesystem. 89<path>/dev/hda1</path> partition, with <c>ext2</c> as filesystem.
208 209
209<comment>(Set the NISDOMAIN variable to your NIS domain name)</comment> 210<comment>(Set the NISDOMAIN variable to your NIS domain name)</comment>
210NISDOMAIN="<i>my-nisdomain</i>" 211NISDOMAIN="<i>my-nisdomain</i>"
211</pre> 212</pre>
212 213
213<p>
214Now add the <c>domainname</c> script to the default runlevel:
215</p>
216
217<pre caption="Adding domainname to the default runlevel">
218# <i>rc-update add domainname default</i>
219</pre>
220
221</body> 214</body>
222</subsection> 215</subsection>
223<subsection> 216<subsection>
224<title>Configuring your Network</title> 217<title>Configuring your Network</title>
225<body> 218<body>
231your Gentoo system permanently. 224your Gentoo system permanently.
232</p> 225</p>
233 226
234<note> 227<note>
235More detailed information about networking, including advanced topics like 228More detailed information about networking, including advanced topics like
236bonding, bridging, 802.11q VLANs or wireless networking is covered in the <uri 229bonding, bridging, 802.1Q VLANs or wireless networking is covered in the <uri
237link="?part=4">Gentoo Network Configuration</uri> section. 230link="?part=4">Gentoo Network Configuration</uri> section.
238</note> 231</note>
239 232
240<p> 233<p>
241All networking information is gathered in <path>/etc/conf.d/net</path>. It uses 234All networking information is gathered in <path>/etc/conf.d/net</path>. It uses
275To enter your own IP address, netmask and gateway, you need 268To enter your own IP address, netmask and gateway, you need
276to set both <c>config_eth0</c> and <c>routes_eth0</c>: 269to set both <c>config_eth0</c> and <c>routes_eth0</c>:
277</p> 270</p>
278 271
279<pre caption="Manually setting IP information for eth0"> 272<pre caption="Manually setting IP information for eth0">
280config_eth0=( "192.168.0.2 netmask 255.255.255.0" ) 273config_eth0=( "192.168.0.2 netmask 255.255.255.0 brd 192.168.0.255" )
281routes_eth0=( "default gw 192.168.0.1" ) 274routes_eth0=( "default gw 192.168.0.1" )
282</pre> 275</pre>
283 276
284<p> 277<p>
285To use DHCP and add specific DHCP options, define <c>config_eth0</c> and 278To use DHCP and add specific DHCP options, define <c>config_eth0</c> and
339<title>Writing Down Network Information</title> 332<title>Writing Down Network Information</title>
340<body> 333<body>
341 334
342<p> 335<p>
343You now need to inform Linux about your network. This is defined in 336You now need to inform Linux about your network. This is defined in
344<path>/etc/hosts</path> and helps in resolving hostnames to IP addresses 337<path>/etc/hosts</path> and helps in resolving hostnames to IP addresses for
345for hosts that aren't resolved by your nameserver. For instance, if your 338hosts that aren't resolved by your nameserver. You need to define your system.
346internal network consists of three PCs called <c>jenny</c> (192.168.0.5), 339You may also want to define other systems on your network if you don't want to
347<c>benny</c> (192.168.0.6) and <c>tux</c> (192.168.0.7 - this system) you would 340set up your own internal DNS system.
348open <path>/etc/hosts</path> and fill in the values:
349</p> 341</p>
350 342
351<pre caption="Opening /etc/hosts"> 343<pre caption="Opening /etc/hosts">
352# <i>nano -w /etc/hosts</i> 344# <i>nano -w /etc/hosts</i>
353</pre> 345</pre>
354 346
355<pre caption="Filling in the networking information"> 347<pre caption="Filling in the networking information">
356127.0.0.1 localhost 348<comment>(This defines the current system)</comment>
349127.0.0.1 tux.homenetwork tux localhost
350
351<comment>(Define extra systems on your network,
352they need to have a static IP to be defined this way.)</comment>
357192.168.0.5 jenny.homenetwork jenny 353192.168.0.5 jenny.homenetwork jenny
358192.168.0.6 benny.homenetwork benny 354192.168.0.6 benny.homenetwork benny
359192.168.0.7 tux.homenetwork tux
360</pre>
361
362<p>
363If your system is the only system (or the nameservers handle all name
364resolution) a single line is sufficient. For instance, if you want to call your
365system <c>tux</c>:
366</p>
367
368<pre caption="/etc/hosts for lonely or fully integrated PCs">
369127.0.0.1 localhost tux
370</pre> 355</pre>
371 356
372<p> 357<p>
373Save and exit the editor to continue. 358Save and exit the editor to continue.
374</p> 359</p>
496# <i>nano -w /etc/conf.d/clock</i> 481# <i>nano -w /etc/conf.d/clock</i>
497</pre> 482</pre>
498 483
499<p> 484<p>
500If your hardware clock is not using UTC, you need to add <c>CLOCK="local"</c> to 485If your hardware clock is not using UTC, you need to add <c>CLOCK="local"</c> to
501the file. Otherwise you will notice some clock skew. 486the file. Otherwise you will notice some clock skew. Furthermore, Windows
487assumes that your hardware clock uses local time, so if you want to dualboot,
488you should set this variable appropriately, otherwise your clock will go crazy.
502</p> 489</p>
503 490
504<p> 491<p>
505When you're finished configuring <path>/etc/conf.d/clock</path>, save and 492When you're finished configuring <path>/etc/conf.d/clock</path>, save and
506exit. 493exit.

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