/[gentoo]/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-filesystems.xml
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1<?xml version='1.0' encoding="UTF-8"?> 1<?xml version='1.0' encoding="UTF-8"?>
2<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-filesystems.xml,v 1.10 2012/04/22 10:59:41 swift Exp $ --> 2<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-filesystems.xml,v 1.11 2012/04/22 11:00:49 swift Exp $ -->
3<!DOCTYPE included SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd"> 3<!DOCTYPE included SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
4 4
5<included> 5<included>
6 6
7<version>8</version> 7<version>9</version>
8<date>2012-04-22</date> 8<date>2012-04-22</date>
9 9
10<section id="filesystemsdesc"> 10<section id="filesystemsdesc">
11<title>Filesystems</title> 11<title>Filesystems</title>
12<body> 12<body>
101journaling for fast recovery in addition to other enhanced journaling modes like 101journaling for fast recovery in addition to other enhanced journaling modes like
102full data and ordered data journaling. It uses an HTree index that enables high 102full data and ordered data journaling. It uses an HTree index that enables high
103performance in almost all situations. In short, ext3 is a very good and 103performance in almost all situations. In short, ext3 is a very good and
104reliable filesystem. Ext3 is the recommended all-purpose all-platform 104reliable filesystem. Ext3 is the recommended all-purpose all-platform
105filesystem. If you intend to install Gentoo on a 105filesystem. If you intend to install Gentoo on a
106very small disk (less than 4GB), then you'll need to tell ext2 to reserve enough 106very small disk (less than 4GB), then you'll need to tell ext3 to reserve enough
107inodes when you create the filesystem. The <c>mke2fs</c> application uses the 107inodes when you create the filesystem. The <c>mke2fs</c> application uses the
108"bytes-per-inode" setting to calculate how many inodes a file system should have. 108"bytes-per-inode" setting to calculate how many inodes a file system should have.
109By running <c>mke2fs -j -T small /dev/&lt;device&gt;</c> the number of inodes will 109By running <c>mke2fs -j -T small /dev/&lt;device&gt;</c> the number of inodes will
110generally quadruple for a given file system as its "bytes-per-inode" reduces from 110generally quadruple for a given file system as its "bytes-per-inode" reduces from
111one every 16kB to one every 4kB. You can tune this even further by using 111one every 16kB to one every 4kB. You can tune this even further by using

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