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1<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?> 1<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd"> 2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3 3
4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license --> 4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5<!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 --> 5<!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6 6
7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-ia64-disk.xml,v 1.12 2011/10/17 19:51:45 swift Exp $ --> 7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-ia64-disk.xml,v 1.14 2012/10/06 19:54:14 swift Exp $ -->
8 8
9<sections> 9<sections>
10 10
11<version>7</version> 11<version>9</version>
12<date>2011-10-17</date> 12<date>2012-10-06</date>
13 13
14<section> 14<section>
15<title>Introduction to Block Devices</title> 15<title>Introduction to Block Devices</title>
16 16
17<subsection> 17<subsection>
18<include href="hb-install-blockdevices.xml"/> 18<include href="hb-install-blockdevices.xml"/>
19</subsection> 19</subsection>
20 20
21<subsection> 21<subsection>
22<title>Partitions</title> 22<title>Partitions</title>
23<body> 23<body>
24 24
25<p> 25<p>
26Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house your Linux 26Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house your Linux
27system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices 27system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices
137 be done in parallel (although this advantage is more with multiple disks than 137 be done in parallel (although this advantage is more with multiple disks than
138 it is with multiple partitions) 138 it is with multiple partitions)
139</li> 139</li>
140<li> 140<li>
141 Security can be enhanced by mounting some partitions or volumes read-only, 141 Security can be enhanced by mounting some partitions or volumes read-only,
142 nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored) etc. 142 nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored) etc.
143</li> 143</li>
144</ul> 144</ul>
145 145
146<p> 146<p>
147However, multiple partitions have disadvantages as well. If not configured 147However, multiple partitions have disadvantages as well. If not configured
148properly, you will have a system with lots of free space on one partition and 148properly, you will have a system with lots of free space on one partition and
149none on another. Another nuisance is that separate partitions - especially 149none on another. Another nuisance is that separate partitions - especially
150for important mountpoints like <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> - often 150for important mountpoints like <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> - often
151require the administrator to boot with an initramfs to mount the partition 151require the administrator to boot with an initramfs to mount the partition
152before other boot scripts start. This isn't always the case though, so YMMV. 152before other boot scripts start. This isn't always the case though, so your
153results may vary.
153</p> 154</p>
154 155
155<p> 156<p>
156There is also a 15-partition limit for SCSI and SATA, unless you use GPT 157There is also a 15-partition limit for SCSI and SATA, unless you use GPT
157labels. 158labels.
158</p> 159</p>
159 160
160<p> 161<p>
161As an example partitioning, we show you one for a 20GB disk, used as a 162As an example partitioning, we show you one for a 20GB disk, used as a
162demonstration laptop (containing webserver, mailserver, gnome, ...): 163demonstration laptop (containing webserver, mailserver, gnome, ...):
163</p> 164</p>
164 165
165<pre caption="Filesystem usage example"> 166<pre caption="Filesystem usage example">
166$ <i>df -h</i> 167$ <i>df -h</i>
167Filesystem Type Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on 168Filesystem Type Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
170/dev/sda7 ext3 7.9G 6.2G 1.3G 83% /usr 171/dev/sda7 ext3 7.9G 6.2G 1.3G 83% /usr
171/dev/sda8 ext3 1011M 483M 477M 51% /opt 172/dev/sda8 ext3 1011M 483M 477M 51% /opt
172/dev/sda9 ext3 2.0G 607M 1.3G 32% /var 173/dev/sda9 ext3 2.0G 607M 1.3G 32% /var
173/dev/sda1 ext2 51M 17M 31M 36% /boot 174/dev/sda1 ext2 51M 17M 31M 36% /boot
174/dev/sda6 swap 516M 12M 504M 2% &lt;not mounted&gt; 175/dev/sda6 swap 516M 12M 504M 2% &lt;not mounted&gt;
175<comment>(Unpartitioned space for future usage: 2 GB)</comment> 176<comment>(Unpartitioned space for future usage: 2 GB)</comment>
176</pre> 177</pre>
177 178
178<p> 179<p>
179<path>/usr</path> is rather full (83% used) here, but once 180<path>/usr</path> is rather full (83% used) here, but once
180all software is installed, <path>/usr</path> doesn't tend to grow that much. 181all software is installed, <path>/usr</path> doesn't tend to grow that much.
181Although allocating a few gigabytes of disk space for <path>/var</path> may 182Although allocating a few gigabytes of disk space for <path>/var</path> may
182seem excessive, remember that Portage uses this partition by default for 183seem excessive, remember that Portage uses this partition by default for
183compiling packages. If you want to keep <path>/var</path> at a more reasonable 184compiling packages. If you want to keep <path>/var</path> at a more reasonable
184size, such as 1GB, you will need to alter your <c>PORTAGE_TMPDIR</c> variable 185size, such as 1GB, you will need to alter your <c>PORTAGE_TMPDIR</c> variable
185in <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to point to the partition with enough free space 186in <path>/etc/portage/make.conf</path> to point to the partition with enough
186for compiling extremely large packages such as OpenOffice. 187free space for compiling extremely large packages such as OpenOffice.
187</p> 188</p>
188 189
189</body> 190</body>
190</subsection> 191</subsection>
191</section> 192</section>
192<section id="parted"> 193<section id="parted">
193<title>Using parted to Partition your Disk</title> 194<title>Using parted to Partition your Disk</title>
194<subsection> 195<subsection>
195<body> 196<body>
196 197
197<p> 198<p>
198The following parts explain how to create the example partition layout 199The following parts explain how to create the example partition layout
199described previously, namely: 200described previously, namely:
200</p> 201</p>
201 202

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