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Wed Jul 21 01:55:53 2010 UTC (4 years, 1 month ago) by nightmorph
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Update the PPC64 handbook for the autobuilds. Major version bump for this release. Fixes bug 260403, bug 292726, and bug 234310.

1 swift 1.1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2     <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3    
4     <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 swift 1.19 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6 swift 1.1
7 nightmorph 1.35 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-ppc64-disk.xml,v 1.34 2009/01/26 08:04:26 nightmorph Exp $ -->
8 swift 1.1
9     <sections>
10 swift 1.8
11 nightmorph 1.35 <abstract>
12     To be able to install Gentoo, you must create the necessary partitions.
13     This chapter describes how to partition a disk for future usage.
14     </abstract>
15    
16     <version>10.0</version>
17     <date>2010-07-20</date>
18 swift 1.8
19 swift 1.1 <section>
20     <title>Introduction to Block Devices</title>
21 nightmorph 1.33
22 swift 1.1 <subsection>
23 nightmorph 1.33 <include href="hb-install-blockdevices.xml"/>
24     </subsection>
25 swift 1.1
26     <subsection>
27     <title>Partitions and Slices</title>
28     <body>
29    
30     <p>
31     Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house your Linux
32     system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices
33     are split up in smaller, more manageable block devices. On most systems,
34     these are called <e>partitions</e>. Other architectures use a similar technique,
35     called <e>slices</e>.
36     </p>
37    
38     </body>
39     </subsection>
40     </section>
41     <section>
42     <title>Designing a Partitioning Scheme</title>
43     <subsection>
44     <title>Default Partitioning Scheme</title>
45     <body>
46    
47     <p>
48     If you are not interested in drawing up a partitioning scheme for your system,
49     you can use the partitioning scheme we use throughout this book:
50     </p>
51    
52     <table>
53     <tr>
54     <th>Partition</th>
55     <th>Filesystem</th>
56     <th>Size</th>
57     <th>Description</th>
58     </tr>
59     <tr>
60     <ti><path>/dev/sda1</path></ti>
61     <ti>Partition map</ti>
62     <ti>31.5k</ti>
63     <ti>Partition map</ti>
64     </tr>
65     <tr>
66     <ti><path>/dev/sda2</path></ti>
67     <ti>(bootstrap)</ti>
68     <ti>800k</ti>
69     <ti>Apple_Bootstrap</ti>
70     </tr>
71     <tr>
72     <ti><path>/dev/sda3</path></ti>
73     <ti>(swap)</ti>
74     <ti>512M</ti>
75     <ti>Swap partition</ti>
76     </tr>
77     <tr>
78     <ti><path>/dev/sda4</path></ti>
79     <ti>ext3</ti>
80     <ti>Rest of the disk</ti>
81     <ti>Root partition</ti>
82     </tr>
83     </table>
84    
85     <note>
86 nightmorph 1.30 There are some partitions named like this: <path>Apple_Driver43</path>,
87     <path>Apple_Driver_ATA</path>, <path>Apple_FWDriver</path>,
88     <path>Apple_Driver_IOKit</path>, and <path>Apple_Patches</path>. If you are not
89     planning to use MacOS 9 you can delete them, because MacOS X and Linux don't
90     need them. You might have to use parted in order to delete them, as mac-fdisk
91     can't delete them yet.
92 swift 1.1 </note>
93    
94     <p>
95     If you are interested in knowing how big a partition should be, or even how
96     many partitions you need, read on. Otherwise continue now with
97     <uri link="#mac-fdisk">Apple G5: Using mac-fdisk to Partition your
98     Disk</uri> or <uri link="#fdisk">IBM pSeries: using fdisk to Partition
99     your Disk</uri>
100     </p>
101    
102     </body>
103     </subsection>
104     <subsection>
105     <title>How Many and How Big?</title>
106     <body>
107    
108     <p>
109     The number of partitions is highly dependent on your environment. For instance,
110     if you have lots of users, you will most likely want to have your
111     <path>/home</path> separate as it increases security and makes backups easier.
112 nightmorph 1.29 If you are installing Gentoo to perform as a mailserver, your <path>/var</path>
113     should be separate as all mails are stored inside <path>/var</path>. A good
114     choice of filesystem will then maximise your performance. Gameservers will have
115     a separate <path>/opt</path> as most gaming servers are installed there. The
116     reason is similar for <path>/home</path>: security and backups. You will
117     definitely want to keep <path>/usr</path> big: not only will it contain the
118     majority of applications, the Portage tree alone takes around 500 Mbyte
119     excluding the various sources that are stored in it.
120 swift 1.1 </p>
121    
122     <p>
123     As you can see, it very much depends on what you want to achieve. Separate
124     partitions or volumes have the following advantages:
125     </p>
126    
127     <ul>
128     <li>
129 neysx 1.3 You can choose the best performing filesystem for each partition or volume
130 swift 1.1 </li>
131     <li>
132     Your entire system cannot run out of free space if one defunct tool is
133     continuously writing files to a partition or volume
134     </li>
135     <li>
136     If necessary, file system checks are reduced in time, as multiple checks can
137     be done in parallel (although this advantage is more with multiple disks than
138     it is with multiple partitions)
139     </li>
140     <li>
141     Security can be enhanced by mounting some partitions or volumes read-only,
142     nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored) etc.
143     </li>
144     </ul>
145    
146     <p>
147 nightmorph 1.29 However, multiple partitions have one big disadvantage: if not configured
148     properly, you might result in having a system with lots of free space on one
149     partition and none on another. There is also a 15-partition limit for SCSI and
150     SATA.
151 swift 1.1 </p>
152    
153     </body>
154     </subsection>
155     </section>
156     <section id="mac-fdisk">
157 nightmorph 1.29 <title>Default: Using mac-fdisk (Apple G5) to Partition your Disk</title>
158 swift 1.1 <body>
159    
160     <p>
161     At this point, create your partitions using <c>mac-fdisk</c>:
162     </p>
163    
164     <pre caption="Starting mac-fdisk">
165 swift 1.2 # <i>mac-fdisk /dev/sda</i>
166 swift 1.1 </pre>
167    
168     <p>
169     First delete the partitions you have cleared previously to make room for your
170     Linux partitions. Use <c>d</c> in <c>mac-fdisk</c> to delete those partition(s).
171     It will ask for the partition number to delete.
172     </p>
173    
174     <p>
175     Second, create an <e>Apple_Bootstrap</e> partition by using <c>b</c>. It will
176     ask for what block you want to start. Enter the number of your first free
177 swift 1.14 partition, followed by a <c>p</c>. For instance this is <c>2p</c>.
178 swift 1.1 </p>
179    
180     <note>
181     This partition is <e>not</e> a "boot" partition. It is not used by Linux at all;
182     you don't have to place any filesystem on it and you should never mount it. PPC
183 neysx 1.12 users don't need an extra partition for <path>/boot</path>.
184 swift 1.1 </note>
185    
186     <p>
187     Now create a swap partition by pressing <c>c</c>. Again <c>mac-fdisk</c> will
188 swift 1.14 ask for what block you want to start this partition from. As we used <c>2</c>
189 swift 1.1 before to create the Apple_Bootstrap partition, you now have to enter
190 swift 1.14 <c>3p</c>. When you're asked for the size, enter <c>512M</c> (or whatever size
191     you want). When asked for a name, enter <c>swap</c> (mandatory).
192 swift 1.1 </p>
193    
194     <p>
195 swift 1.14 To create the root partition, enter <c>c</c>, followed by <c>4p</c> to select
196 swift 1.1 from what block the root partition should start. When asked for the size, enter
197 swift 1.14 <c>4p</c> again. <c>mac-fdisk</c> will interpret this as "Use all available
198 swift 1.1 space". When asked for the name, enter <c>root</c> (mandatory).
199     </p>
200    
201     <p>
202     To finish up, write the partition to the disk using <c>w</c> and <c>q</c> to
203     quit <c>mac-fdisk</c>.
204     </p>
205 fox2mike 1.22
206 sejo 1.7 <note>
207 fox2mike 1.22 To make sure everything is ok, you should run mac-fdisk once more and check
208 nightmorph 1.29 whether all the partitions are there. If you don't see any of the partitions you
209 fox2mike 1.22 created, or the changes you made, you should reinitialize your partitions by
210 nightmorph 1.29 pressing <c>i</c> in mac-fdisk. Note that this will recreate the partition map
211     and thus remove all your partitions.
212 sejo 1.7 </note>
213    
214 swift 1.1 <p>
215 nightmorph 1.34 Now that your partitions are created, you can continue with <uri
216 swift 1.1 link="#filesystems">Creating Filesystems</uri>.
217     </p>
218    
219     </body>
220     </section>
221     <section id="fdisk">
222 swift 1.18 <title>IBM pSeries, iSeries and OpenPower: using fdisk to Partition your Disk</title>
223 swift 1.1 <subsection>
224     <body>
225    
226 swift 1.18 <note>
227 nightmorph 1.29 If you are planning to use a RAID disk array for your Gentoo installation and
228 fox2mike 1.24 you are using POWER5-based hardware, you should now run <c>iprconfig</c> to
229     format the disks to Advanced Function format and create the disk array. You
230     should emerge <c>iprutils</c> after your install is complete.
231 swift 1.18 </note>
232    
233 swift 1.1 <p>
234 nightmorph 1.29 If you have an ipr-based SCSI adapter, you should start the ipr utilities now.
235 fox2mike 1.24 </p>
236    
237     <pre caption="Starting ipr utilities">
238     # <i>/etc/init.d/iprinit start</i>
239     </pre>
240    
241     <p>
242 swift 1.1 The following parts explain how to create the example partition layout
243     described previously, namely:
244     </p>
245    
246     <table>
247     <tr>
248     <th>Partition</th>
249     <th>Description</th>
250     </tr>
251     <tr>
252     <ti><path>/dev/sda1</path></ti>
253     <ti>PPC PReP Boot partition</ti>
254     </tr>
255     <tr>
256     <ti><path>/dev/sda2</path></ti>
257     <ti>Swap partition</ti>
258     </tr>
259     <tr>
260     <ti><path>/dev/sda3</path></ti>
261     <ti>Root partition</ti>
262     </tr>
263     </table>
264    
265     <p>
266 neysx 1.5 Change your partition layout according to your own preference.
267 swift 1.1 </p>
268    
269     </body>
270     </subsection>
271     <subsection>
272     <title>Viewing the Current Partition Layout</title>
273     <body>
274    
275     <p>
276     <c>fdisk</c> is a popular and powerful tool to split your disk into
277     partitions. Fire up <c>fdisk</c> on your disk (in our example, we
278     use <path>/dev/sda</path>):
279     </p>
280    
281     <pre caption="Starting fdisk">
282     # <i>fdisk /dev/sda</i>
283     </pre>
284    
285     <p>
286     Once in <c>fdisk</c>, you'll be greeted with a prompt that looks like
287     this:
288     </p>
289    
290     <pre caption="fdisk prompt">
291     Command (m for help):
292     </pre>
293    
294     <p>
295 neysx 1.25 If you still have an AIX partition layout on your system, you will get the
296     following error message:
297     </p>
298    
299     <pre caption="Error message from fdisk">
300     There is a valid AIX label on this disk.
301     Unfortunately Linux cannot handle these
302     disks at the moment. Nevertheless some
303     advice:
304     1. fdisk will destroy its contents on write.
305     2. Be sure that this disk is NOT a still vital
306     part of a volume group. (Otherwise you may
307     erase the other disks as well, if unmirrored.)
308     3. Before deleting this physical volume be sure
309     to remove the disk logically from your AIX
310     machine. (Otherwise you become an AIXpert).
311    
312     Command (m for help):
313     </pre>
314    
315     <p>
316 nightmorph 1.35 Don't worry, you can create a new empty DOS partition table by pressing
317 neysx 1.25 <c>o</c>.
318     </p>
319    
320     <warn>
321 nightmorph 1.35 This will destroy any installed AIX version!
322 neysx 1.25 </warn>
323    
324     <p>
325     Type <c>p</c> to display your disk current partition configuration:
326 swift 1.1 </p>
327    
328     <pre caption="An example partition configuration">
329 nightmorph 1.35 Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
330 swift 1.1
331     Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
332     141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
333     Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
334    
335     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
336 neysx 1.11 /dev/sda1 1 12 53266+ 83 Linux
337     /dev/sda2 13 233 981571+ 82 Linux swap
338     /dev/sda3 234 674 1958701+ 83 Linux
339     /dev/sda4 675 6761 27035410+ 5 Extended
340     /dev/sda5 675 2874 9771268+ 83 Linux
341     /dev/sda6 2875 2919 199836 83 Linux
342     /dev/sda7 2920 3008 395262 83 Linux
343     /dev/sda8 3009 6761 16668918 83 Linux
344 swift 1.1
345     Command (m for help):
346     </pre>
347    
348     <p>
349 neysx 1.11 This particular disk is configured to house six Linux filesystems
350 swift 1.1 (each with a corresponding partition listed as "Linux") as well as a
351     swap partition (listed as "Linux swap").
352     </p>
353    
354     </body>
355     </subsection>
356     <subsection>
357     <title>Removing all Partitions</title>
358     <body>
359    
360     <p>
361     We will first remove all existing partitions from the disk. Type
362     <c>d</c> to delete a partition. For instance, to delete an existing
363     <path>/dev/sda1</path>:
364     </p>
365    
366 neysx 1.11 <note>
367 nightmorph 1.35 If you don't want to delete all partitions just delete those you want to delete.
368     At this point you should create a backup of your data to avoid losing it.
369 swift 1.1 </note>
370    
371     <pre caption="Deleting a partition">
372     Command (m for help): <i>d</i>
373     Partition number (1-4): <i>1</i>
374     </pre>
375    
376     <p>
377     The partition has been scheduled for deletion. It will no longer show up
378     if you type <c>p</c>, but it will not be erased until your changes have
379     been saved. If you made a mistake and want to abort without saving your
380 nightmorph 1.35 changes, type <c>q</c> immediately and hit Enter and your partition will
381 swift 1.1 not be deleted.
382     </p>
383    
384     <p>
385     Now, assuming that you do indeed want to wipe out all the partitions on
386     your system, repeatedly type <c>p</c> to print out a partition listing
387     and then type <c>d</c> and the number of the partition to delete it.
388     Eventually, you'll end up with a partition table with nothing in it:
389     </p>
390    
391     <pre caption="An empty partition table">
392     Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
393     141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
394     Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
395    
396     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
397    
398     Command (m for help):
399     </pre>
400    
401     <p>
402     Now that the in-memory partition table is empty, we're ready to create
403     the partitions. We will use a default partitioning scheme as discussed
404     previously. Of course, don't follow these instructions to the letter if
405     you don't want the same partitioning scheme!
406     </p>
407    
408     </body>
409     </subsection>
410     <subsection>
411     <title>Creating the PPC PReP boot partition</title>
412     <body>
413    
414     <p>
415     We first create a small PReP boot partition. Type <c>n</c> to create a new
416     partition, then <c>p</c> to select a primary partition, followed by
417     <c>1</c> to select the first primary partition. When prompted for the
418     first cylinder, hit enter. When prompted for the last cylinder, type
419 nightmorph 1.35 <c>+7M</c> to create a partition 7 MB in size. After you've done
420 swift 1.1 this, type <c>t</c> to set the partition type, <c>1</c> to select the
421     partition you just created and then type in <c>41</c> to set the
422 swift 1.18 partition type to "PPC PReP Boot". Finally, you'll need to mark the PReP
423     partition as bootable.
424 swift 1.1 </p>
425    
426     <note>
427 nightmorph 1.35 The PReP partition has to be smaller than 8 MB!
428 swift 1.1 </note>
429    
430 swift 1.18 <pre caption="Creating the PReP boot partition">
431 swift 1.1 Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
432    
433     Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
434     141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
435     Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
436    
437     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
438    
439     Command (m for help): <i>n</i>
440     Command action
441     e extended
442     p primary partition (1-4)
443     <i>p</i>
444     Partition number (1-4): <i>1</i>
445     First cylinder (1-6761, default 1):
446     Using default value 1
447     Last cylinder or +size or +sizeM or +sizeK (1-6761, default
448     6761): <i>+8M</i>
449    
450     Command (m for help): <i>t</i>
451     Selected partition 1
452     Hex code (type L to list codes): <i>41</i>
453     Changed system type of partition 1 to 41 (PPC PReP Boot)
454    
455 swift 1.18 Command (m for help): <i>a</i>
456     Partition number (1-4): <i>1</i>
457 swift 1.1 Command (m for help):
458     </pre>
459    
460     <p>
461 swift 1.18 Now, when you type <c>p</c>, you should see the following partition information:
462 swift 1.1 </p>
463    
464     <pre caption="Created boot partition">
465     Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
466    
467     Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
468     141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
469     Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
470    
471     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
472 swift 1.18 /dev/sda1 * 1 3 13293 41 PPC PReP Boot
473 swift 1.1
474     Command (m for help):
475     </pre>
476     </body>
477     </subsection>
478     <subsection>
479     <title>Creating the Swap Partition</title>
480     <body>
481    
482     <p>
483     Let's now create the swap partition. To do this, type <c>n</c> to create
484     a new partition, then <c>p</c> to tell fdisk that you want a primary
485     partition. Then type <c>2</c> to create the second primary partition,
486 swift 1.2 <path>/dev/sda2</path> in our case. When prompted for the first
487 swift 1.1 cylinder, hit enter. When prompted for the last cylinder, type
488     <c>+512M</c> to create a partition 512MB in size. After you've done
489     this, type <c>t</c> to set the partition type, <c>2</c> to select the
490     partition you just created and then type in <c>82</c> to set the
491     partition type to "Linux Swap". After completing these steps, typing
492     <c>p</c> should display a partition table that looks similar to this:
493     </p>
494    
495     <pre caption="Partition listing after creating a swap partition">
496     Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
497    
498     Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
499     141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
500     Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
501    
502     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
503 neysx 1.11 /dev/sda1 1 3 13293 41 PPC PReP Boot
504     /dev/sda2 4 117 506331 82 Linux swap
505 swift 1.1
506     Command (m for help):
507     </pre>
508    
509     </body>
510     </subsection>
511     <subsection>
512     <title>Creating the Root Partition</title>
513     <body>
514    
515     <p>
516     Finally, let's create the root partition. To do this, type <c>n</c> to
517     create a new partition, then <c>p</c> to tell fdisk that you want a
518     primary partition. Then type <c>3</c> to create the third primary
519     partition, <path>/dev/sda3</path> in our case. When prompted for the
520     first cylinder, hit enter. When prompted for the last cylinder, hit
521     enter to create a partition that takes up the rest of the remaining
522     space on your disk. After completing these steps, typing <c>p</c> should
523     display a partition table that looks similar to this:
524     </p>
525    
526     <pre caption="Partition listing after creating the root partition">
527 nightmorph 1.35 Command (m for help): <i>p</i>
528 swift 1.1
529     Disk /dev/sda: 30.7 GB, 30750031872 bytes
530     141 heads, 63 sectors/track, 6761 cylinders
531     Units = cylinders of 8883 * 512 = 4548096 bytes
532    
533     Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
534 neysx 1.11 /dev/sda1 1 3 13293 41 PPC PReP Boot
535     /dev/sda2 4 117 506331 82 Linux swap
536     /dev/sda3 118 6761 29509326 83 Linux
537 swift 1.1
538     Command (m for help):
539     </pre>
540     </body>
541     </subsection>
542     <subsection>
543     <title>Saving the Partition Layout</title>
544     <body>
545    
546     <p>
547     To save the partition layout and exit <c>fdisk</c>, type <c>w</c>.
548     </p>
549    
550     <pre caption="Save and exit fdisk">
551     Command (m for help): <i>w</i>
552     </pre>
553    
554     <p>
555 nightmorph 1.34 Now that your partitions are created, you can continue with <uri
556 swift 1.1 link="#filesystems">Creating Filesystems</uri>.
557     </p>
558    
559     </body>
560     </subsection>
561 neysx 1.11 </section>
562     <section id="filesystems">
563     <title>Creating Filesystems</title>
564     <subsection>
565     <title>Introduction</title>
566     <body>
567    
568     <p>
569     Now that your partitions are created, it is time to place a filesystem on them.
570     If you don't care about what filesystem to choose and are happy with what we use
571     as default in this handbook, continue with <uri
572     link="#filesystems-apply">Applying a Filesystem to a Partition</uri>.
573     Otherwise read on to learn about the available filesystems...
574     </p>
575    
576     </body>
577     </subsection>
578 nightmorph 1.33
579 swift 1.1 <subsection>
580 nightmorph 1.33 <include href="hb-install-filesystems.xml"/>
581     </subsection>
582 swift 1.1
583     <subsection id="filesystems-apply">
584     <title>Applying a Filesystem to a Partition</title>
585     <body>
586    
587     <p>
588     To create a filesystem on a partition or volume, there are tools available for
589     each possible filesystem:
590     </p>
591    
592     <table>
593     <tr>
594     <th>Filesystem</th>
595     <th>Creation Command</th>
596     </tr>
597     <tr>
598     <ti>ext2</ti>
599     <ti><c>mke2fs</c></ti>
600     </tr>
601     <tr>
602     <ti>ext3</ti>
603     <ti><c>mke2fs -j</c></ti>
604     </tr>
605     <tr>
606     <ti>reiserfs</ti>
607     <ti><c>mkreiserfs</c></ti>
608     </tr>
609     <tr>
610     <ti>xfs</ti>
611     <ti><c>mkfs.xfs</c></ti>
612     </tr>
613     <tr>
614     <ti>jfs</ti>
615     <ti><c>mkfs.jfs</c></ti>
616     </tr>
617     </table>
618    
619     <p>
620     For instance, to have the root partition (<path>/dev/sda4</path> in our example)
621     in ext3 (as in our example), you would use:
622     </p>
623    
624     <pre caption="Applying a filesystem on a partition">
625 nightmorph 1.29 # <i>mke2fs -j /dev/sda4</i>
626 swift 1.1 </pre>
627    
628     <p>
629     Now create the filesystems on your newly created partitions (or logical
630     volumes).
631     </p>
632    
633 nightmorph 1.32 <impo>
634     If you choose to use ReiserFS for <path>/</path>, do not change its default
635     block size if you will also be using <c>yaboot</c> as your bootloader, as
636     explained in <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=10">Configuring the Bootloader</uri>.
637     </impo>
638    
639 swift 1.1 </body>
640     </subsection>
641     <subsection>
642     <title>Activating the Swap Partition</title>
643     <body>
644    
645     <p>
646     <c>mkswap</c> is the command that is used to initialize swap partitions:
647     </p>
648    
649     <pre caption="Creating a Swap signature">
650     # <i>mkswap /dev/sda3</i>
651     </pre>
652    
653     <p>
654     To activate the swap partition, use <c>swapon</c>:
655     </p>
656    
657     <pre caption="Activating the swap partition">
658     # <i>swapon /dev/sda3</i>
659     </pre>
660    
661     <p>
662 swift 1.15 Create and activate the swap with the commands mentioned above.
663 swift 1.1 </p>
664    
665     </body>
666     </subsection>
667     </section>
668     <section>
669     <title>Mounting</title>
670     <body>
671    
672     <p>
673     Now that your partitions are initialized and are housing a filesystem, it is
674     time to mount those partitions. Use the <c>mount</c> command. Don't forget to
675     create the necessary mount directories for every partition you created. As an
676 nightmorph 1.29 example we create a mount point and mount the root partition:
677 swift 1.1 </p>
678    
679     <pre caption="Mounting partitions">
680     # <i>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</i>
681     # <i>mount /dev/sda4 /mnt/gentoo</i>
682     </pre>
683    
684     <note>
685     If you want your <path>/tmp</path> to reside on a separate partition, be sure to
686     change its permissions after mounting: <c>chmod 1777 /mnt/gentoo/tmp</c>. This
687     also holds for <path>/var/tmp</path>.
688     </note>
689    
690     <p>
691     Continue with <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=5">Installing the Gentoo
692     Installation Files</uri>.
693     </p>
694    
695     </body>
696     </section>
697     </sections>

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