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Separation of Gentoo Handbook into Current and 2004.3

1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3
4 <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/1.0 -->
6
7 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/draft/hb-install-ppc64-medium.xml,v 1.12 2004/12/31 18:16:24 swift Exp $ -->
8
9 <sections>
10
11 <version>1.10</version>
12 <date>2005-01-04</date>
13
14 <section>
15 <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
16 <subsection>
17 <title>Introduction</title>
18 <body>
19
20 <p>
21 Before we start, we first list what hardware requirements you need to
22 successfully install Gentoo on your box.
23 </p>
24
25 </body>
26 </subsection>
27 <subsection>
28 <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
29 <body>
30
31 <table>
32 <tr>
33 <th>CPU</th>
34 <ti>Any PowerPC64 CPU</ti>
35 </tr>
36 <tr>
37 <th>Systems</th>
38 <ti>
39 IBM RS/6000s, Power Macintosh G5, IBP pSeries and IBM iSeries
40 </ti>
41 </tr>
42 <tr>
43 <th>Memory</th>
44 <ti>64 MB</ti>
45 </tr>
46 <tr>
47 <th>Diskspace</th>
48 <ti>1.5 GB (excluding swap space)</ti>
49 </tr>
50 <tr>
51 <th>Swap space</th>
52 <ti>At least 256 MB</ti>
53 </tr>
54 </table>
55
56 <p>
57 For a full list of supported systems, please go to
58 <uri>http://www.linuxppc64.org/hardware.shtml</uri>.
59 </p>
60
61 </body>
62 </subsection>
63 </section>
64 <!-- Copy/paste from hb-install-x86-medium.xml, with s/x86/ppc64/ -->
65 <!-- START -->
66 <section>
67 <title>The Gentoo Installation Approaches</title>
68 <subsection>
69 <title>Introduction</title>
70 <body>
71
72 <p>
73 Gentoo Linux can be installed using one of three <e>stage</e> tarball files.
74 A stage file is a tarball (compressed archive) that contains a minimal
75 environment.
76 </p>
77
78 <ul>
79 <li>
80 A stage1 file contains nothing more than a compiler, Portage (Gentoo's
81 software management system) and a couple of packages on which the compiler
82 or Portage depends.
83 </li>
84 <li>
85 A stage2 file contains a so-called bootstrapped system, a minimal
86 environment from which one can start building all other necessary
87 applications that make a Gentoo environment complete.
88 </li>
89 <li>
90 A stage3 file contains a prebuilt minimal system which is almost fully
91 deployable. It only lacks a few applications where you, the Gentoo user,
92 needs to choose which one you want to install.
93 </li>
94 </ul>
95
96 <p>
97 To help you decide what stage file you want to use, we have written down the
98 major advantages and disadvantages of each stage file.
99 </p>
100
101 </body>
102 </subsection>
103 <subsection>
104 <title>A Stage1 Approach</title>
105 <body>
106
107 <p>
108 A <e>stage1</e> is used when you want to bootstrap and build the entire system
109 from scratch.
110 </p>
111
112 <p>
113 Starting from a stage1 allows you to have total control over the
114 optimization settings and optional build-time functionality that is
115 initially enabled on your system. This makes <e>stage1</e> installs good for
116 power users who know what they are doing. It is also a great
117 installation method for those who would like to know more about the
118 inner workings of Gentoo Linux.
119 </p>
120
121 <table>
122 <tr>
123 <th>Stage1</th>
124 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
125 </tr>
126 <tr>
127 <th>+</th>
128 <ti>
129 Allows you to have total control over the optimization settings and optional
130 build-time functionality that is initially enabled on your system
131 </ti>
132 </tr>
133 <tr>
134 <th>+</th>
135 <ti>Suitable for powerusers that know what they are doing</ti>
136 </tr>
137 <tr>
138 <th>+</th>
139 <ti>Allows you to learn more about the inner workings of Gentoo</ti>
140 </tr>
141 <tr>
142 <th>-</th>
143 <ti>Takes a long time to finish the installation</ti>
144 </tr>
145 <tr>
146 <th>-</th>
147 <ti>
148 If you don't intend to tweak the settings, it is a waste of time
149 </ti>
150 </tr>
151 </table>
152
153 </body>
154 </subsection>
155 <subsection>
156 <title>A Stage2 Approach</title>
157 <body>
158
159 <p>
160 A <e>stage2</e> is used for building the entire system from a bootstrapped
161 "semi-compiled" state.
162 </p>
163
164 <p>
165 Stage2 installs allow you to skip the bootstrap process; doing this
166 is fine if you are happy with the optimization settings that we chose
167 for your particular stage2 tarball.
168 </p>
169
170 <table>
171 <tr>
172 <th>Stage2</th>
173 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
174 </tr>
175 <tr>
176 <th>+</th>
177 <ti>You don't need to bootstrap</ti>
178 </tr>
179 <tr>
180 <th>+</th>
181 <ti>Faster than starting with stage1</ti>
182 </tr>
183 <tr>
184 <th>+</th>
185 <ti>You can still tweak your settings</ti>
186 </tr>
187 <tr>
188 <th>-</th>
189 <ti>You cannot tweak as much as with a stage1</ti>
190 </tr>
191 <tr>
192 <th>-</th>
193 <ti>It's still not the fastest way to install Gentoo</ti>
194 </tr>
195 <tr>
196 <th>-</th>
197 <ti>You have to accept the optimizations we chose for the bootstrap</ti>
198 </tr>
199 </table>
200
201 </body>
202 </subsection>
203 <subsection>
204 <title>A Stage3 Approach</title>
205 <body>
206
207 <p>
208 A <e>stage3</e> installation contains a basic Gentoo Linux system that has been
209 built for you. You will only need to build a few packages of which we can't
210 decide for you which one to choose.
211 </p>
212
213 <p>
214 Choosing to go with a stage3 allows for the fastest install of Gentoo
215 Linux, but also means that your base system will have the optimization
216 settings that we chose for you (which to be honest, are good settings
217 and were carefully chosen to enhance performance while maintaining
218 stability). Stage3 is also required if you want to install Gentoo using
219 prebuilt packages or without a network connection.
220 </p>
221
222 <table>
223 <tr>
224 <th>Stage3</th>
225 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
226 </tr>
227 <tr>
228 <th>+</th>
229 <ti>Fastest way to get a Gentoo base system</ti>
230 </tr>
231 <tr>
232 <th>-</th>
233 <ti>You cannot tweak the base system - it's built already</ti>
234 </tr>
235 </table>
236
237 <p>
238 You might be interested to know that, if you decide to use different
239 optimization settings after having installed Gentoo, you will be able to
240 recompile your entire system with the new optimization settings.
241 </p>
242
243 </body>
244 </subsection>
245 </section>
246 <section>
247 <title>The Gentoo LiveCDs</title>
248 <subsection>
249 <title>Introduction</title>
250 <body>
251
252 <p>
253 The <e>Gentoo LiveCDs</e> are bootable CDs which contain a
254 self-sustained Gentoo environment. They allow you to boot Linux from the CD.
255 During the boot process your hardware is detected and the appropriate drivers
256 are loaded. They are maintained by Gentoo developers.
257 </p>
258
259 <p>
260 All LiveCDs allow you to boot, set up networking, initialize your
261 partitions and start installing Gentoo from the Internet. We currently provide
262 two LiveCDs which are equaly suitable to install Gentoo from, as long as you're
263 planning on performing an Internet-based installation using the latest version
264 of the available packages.
265 </p>
266
267 <p>
268 If you whish to install Gentoo without a working Internet connection, please use
269 the installation instructions described in the <uri
270 link="2004.3/index.xml">Gentoo 2004.3 Handbooks</uri>. This is currently not
271 supported for the PPC64 architecture though.
272 </p>
273
274 <p>
275 For the PowerPC64 architecture, we only supply a <e>Minimal</e> LiveCD,
276 a small, no-nonsense, bootable CD which sole purpose is to boot the system,
277 prepare the networking and continue with the Gentoo installation.
278 </p>
279
280 </body>
281 </subsection>
282 <subsection>
283 <title>Gentoo's Minimal LiveCD</title>
284 <body>
285
286 <p>
287 The Minimal LiveCD is called <c>install-ppc64-pSeries-minimal-2004.3.iso</c> or
288 <c>install-ppc64-g5-minimal-2004.3.iso</c> and takes up only 350 MB of
289 diskspace. You can use this LiveCD to install Gentoo, but always with a
290 working Internet connection only.
291 </p>
292
293 <table>
294 <tr>
295 <th>Minimal LiveCD</th>
296 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
297 </tr>
298 <tr>
299 <th>+</th>
300 <ti>Smallest download</ti>
301 </tr>
302 <tr>
303 <th>+</th>
304 <ti>
305 You can do a stage1, stage2 or stage3 by getting the stage tarball off the
306 net
307 </ti>
308 </tr>
309 <tr>
310 <th>-</th>
311 <ti>
312 Contains no stages, no Portage snapshot, no prebuilt packages and is
313 therefore not suitable for networkless installation
314 </ti>
315 </tr>
316 </table>
317
318 </body>
319 </subsection>
320 </section>
321 <!-- STOP -->
322 <section>
323 <title>Download, Burn and Boot a Gentoo LiveCD</title>
324 <subsection>
325 <title>Downloading and Burning the LiveCDs</title>
326 <body>
327
328 <p>
329 You have chosen to use a Gentoo LiveCD. We'll first start by downloading and
330 burning the chosen LiveCD. We previously discussed the several available
331 LiveCDs, but where can you find them?
332 </p>
333
334 <p>
335 You can download any of the LiveCDs (and, if you want to, a Packages CD as
336 well) from one of our <uri link="/main/en/mirrors.xml">mirrors</uri>. The
337 LiveCDs are located in the <path>releases/ppc64/2004.3/livecd</path> directory.
338 </p>
339
340 <p>
341 Inside that directory you'll find so-called ISO-files. Those are full CD images
342 which you can write on a CD-R.
343 </p>
344
345 <p>
346 In case you wonder if your downloaded file is corrupted or not, you can
347 check its MD5 checksum and compare it with the MD5 checksum we provide (such as
348 <path>install-ppc64-g5-minimal-2004.3.iso.md5</path>). You can check the MD5
349 checksum with the <c>md5sum</c> tool under Linux/Unix or <uri
350 link="http://www.etree.org/md5com.html">md5sum</uri> for Windows.
351 </p>
352
353 <p>
354 Another way to check the validity of the downloaded file is to use GnuPG to
355 verify the cryptographic signature that we provide (the file ending with
356 <path>.asc</path>). Download the signature file and obtain the public key:
357 </p>
358
359 <pre caption="Obtaining the public key">
360 $ <i>gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys 17072058</i>
361 </pre>
362
363 <p>
364 Now verify the signature:
365 </p>
366
367 <pre caption="Verify the cryptographic signature">
368 $ <i>gpg --verify &lt;signature file&gt; &lt;downloaded iso&gt;</i>
369 </pre>
370
371 <p>
372 To burn the downloaded ISO(s), you have to select raw-burning. How you
373 do this is highly program-dependent. We will discuss <c>cdrecord</c> and
374 <c>K3B</c> here; more information can be found in our <uri
375 link="/doc/en/faq.xml#isoburning">Gentoo FAQ</uri>.
376 </p>
377
378 <ul>
379 <li>
380 With cdrecord, you simply type <c>cdrecord dev=/dev/hdc &lt;downloaded iso
381 file&gt;</c> (replace <path>/dev/hdc</path> with your CD-RW drive's
382 device path) followed by the path to the ISO file :)
383 </li>
384 <li>
385 With K3B, select <c>Tools</c> &gt; <c>CD</c> &gt; <c>Burn Image</c>. Then
386 you can locate your ISO file within the 'Image to Burn' area. Finally click
387 <c>Start</c>.
388 </li>
389 <li>
390 With Mac OS X Panther, launch <c>Disk Utility</c> from
391 <path>Applications/Utilities</path>, select <c>Open</c> from the
392 <c>Images</c> menu, select the mounted disk image in the main window and
393 select <c>Burn</c> in the <c>Images</c> menu.
394 </li>
395 <li>
396 With Mac OS X Jaguar, launch <c>Disk Copy</c> from
397 <path>Applications/Utilities</path>, select <c>Burn Image</c> from the
398 <c>File</c> menu, select the ISO and click the <c>Burn</c> button.
399 </li>
400 </ul>
401
402 </body>
403 </subsection>
404 <subsection>
405 <title>Default: Booting the LiveCD on an Apple/IBM</title>
406 <body>
407
408 <p>
409 Place the LiveCD in the CD-ROM and reboot the system. Hold down the 'C' key at
410 bootup. You will be greeted by a friendly welcome message and a <e>boot:</e>
411 prompt at the bottom of the screen.
412 </p>
413
414 <p>
415 You are also able to tweak some kernel options at this prompt. The following
416 table lists the available boot options you can add:
417 </p>
418
419 <table>
420 <tr>
421 <th>Boot Option</th>
422 <th>Description</th>
423 </tr>
424 <tr>
425 <ti><c>video</c></ti>
426 <ti>
427 This option takes one of the following vendor-specific tags:
428 <c>radeonfb</c>, <c>rivafb</c>, <c>atyfb</c>, <c>aty128</c> or
429 <c>ofonly</c>. You can follow this tag with the resolution and refreshrate
430 you want to use. For instance <c>video=radeonfb:1280x1024@75</c>. If you are
431 uncertain what to choose, <c>ofonly</c> will most certainly work.
432 </ti>
433 </tr>
434 <tr>
435 <ti><c>nol3</c></ti>
436 <ti>
437 Disables level 3 cache on some powerbooks (needed for at least the 17'')
438 </ti>
439 </tr>
440 <tr>
441 <ti><c>debug</c></ti>
442 <ti>
443 Enables verbose booting, spawns an initrd shell that can be used to debug
444 the LiveCD
445 </ti>
446 </tr>
447 <tr>
448 <ti><c>sleep=X</c></ti>
449 <ti>
450 Wait X seconds before continuing; this can be needed by some very old SCSI
451 CD-ROMs which don't speed up the CD quick enough
452 </ti>
453 </tr>
454 <tr>
455 <ti><c>bootfrom=X</c></ti>
456 <ti>
457 Boot from a different device
458 </ti>
459 </tr>
460 </table>
461
462 <p>
463 At this prompt, hit enter, and a complete Gentoo Linux environment will be
464 loaded from the CD. Continue with <uri link="#booted">And When You're
465 Booted...</uri>.
466 </p>
467
468 </body>
469 </subsection>
470 <subsection>
471 <title>IBM pSeries</title>
472 <body>
473
474 <p>
475 For pSeries boxes, sometimes the cds might not autoboot. You might have
476 to set up your cdrom as a bootable device in the multi-boot menu. (F1 at
477 startup) The other option is to jump into OF and do it from there:
478 </p>
479
480 <p>
481 1) Boot into OF (this is 8 from the serial cons or F8 from a graphics
482 cons, start hitting the key when you see the keyboard mouse etc etc
483 messages
484 </p>
485 <p>
486 2) run the command 0> boot cdrom:1,yaboot
487 </p>
488 <p>
489 3) stand back and enjoy!
490 </p>
491
492 </body>
493 </subsection>
494 <subsection id="booted">
495 <title>And When You're Booted...</title>
496 <body>
497
498 <p>
499 You will be greeted by a root ("#") prompt on the current console. You can also
500 switch to other consoles by pressing Alt-fn-F2, Alt-fn-F3 and Alt-fn-F4. Get
501 back to the one you started on by pressing Alt-fn-F1.
502 </p>
503
504 <p>
505 If you are installing Gentoo on a system with a non-US keyboard, use
506 <c>loadkeys</c> to load the keymap for your keyboard. To list the available
507 keymaps, execute <c>ls /usr/share/keymaps/i386</c>.
508 </p>
509
510 <pre caption="Listing available keymaps">
511 <comment>(PPC uses x86 keymaps on most systems. The mac/ppc keymaps provided
512 on the LiveCD are ADB keymaps and unusable with the LiveCD kernel)</comment>
513 # <i>ls /usr/share/keymaps/i386</i>
514 </pre>
515
516 <p>
517 Now load the keymap of your choice:
518 </p>
519
520 <pre caption="Loading a keymap">
521 # <i>loadkeys be-latin1</i>
522 </pre>
523
524 <p>
525 Now continue with <uri link="#hardware">Extra Hardware Configuration</uri>.
526 </p>
527
528 </body>
529 </subsection>
530 <subsection id="hardware">
531 <title>Extra Hardware Configuration</title>
532 <body>
533
534 <p>
535 When the Live CD boots, it tries to detect all your hardware devices and
536 loads the appropriate kernel modules to support your hardware. In the
537 vast majority of cases, it does a very good job. However, in some cases (the
538 SPARC LiveCDs don't even do autodetection), it may not auto-load the kernel
539 modules you need. If the PCI auto-detection missed some of your system's
540 hardware, you will have to load the appropriate kernel modules manually.
541 </p>
542
543 <p>
544 In the next example we try to load the <c>8139too</c> module (support for
545 certain kinds of network interfaces):
546 </p>
547
548 <pre caption="Loading kernel modules">
549 # <i>modprobe 8139too</i>
550 </pre>
551
552 </body>
553 </subsection>
554 <subsection>
555 <title>Optional: Tweaking Hard Disk Performance</title>
556 <body>
557
558 <p>
559 If you are an advanced user, you might want to tweak the IDE hard disk
560 performance using <c>hdparm</c>. With the <c>-tT</c> options you can
561 test the performance of your disk (execute it several times to get a
562 more precise impression):
563 </p>
564
565 <pre caption="Testing disk performance">
566 # <i>hdparm -tT /dev/hda</i>
567 </pre>
568
569 <p>
570 To tweak, you can use any of the following examples (or experiment
571 yourself) which use <path>/dev/hda</path> as disk (substitute with your
572 disk):
573 </p>
574
575 <pre caption="Tweaking hard disk performance">
576 <comment>Activate DMA:</comment> # <i>hdparm -d 1 /dev/hda</i>
577 <comment>Activate DMA + Safe Performance-enhancing Options:</comment> # <i>hdparm -d 1 -A 1 -m 16 -u 1 -a 64 /dev/hda</i>
578 </pre>
579
580 </body>
581 </subsection>
582 <subsection id="useraccounts">
583 <title>Optional: User Accounts</title>
584 <body>
585
586 <p>
587 If you plan on giving other people access to your installation
588 environment or you want to chat using <c>irssi</c> without root privileges (for
589 security reasons), you need to create the necessary user accounts and change
590 the root password.
591 </p>
592
593 <p>
594 To change the root password, use the <c>passwd</c> utility:
595 </p>
596
597 <pre caption="Changing the root password">
598 # <i>passwd</i>
599 New password: <comment>(Enter your new password)</comment>
600 Re-enter password: <comment>(Re-enter your password)</comment>
601 </pre>
602
603 <p>
604 To create a user account, we first enter their credentials, followed by
605 its password. We use <c>useradd</c> and <c>passwd</c> for these tasks.
606 In the next example, we create a user called &quot;john&quot;.
607 </p>
608
609 <pre caption="Creating a user account">
610 # <i>useradd -m -G users john</i>
611 # <i>passwd john</i>
612 New password: <comment>(Enter john's password)</comment>
613 Re-enter password: <comment>(Re-enter john's password)</comment>
614 </pre>
615
616 <p>
617 You can change your user id from root to the newly created user by using
618 <c>su</c>:
619 </p>
620
621 <pre caption="Changing user id">
622 # <i>su - john</i>
623 </pre>
624
625 </body>
626 </subsection>
627 <subsection>
628 <title>Optional: Viewing Documentation while Installing</title>
629 <body>
630
631 <p>
632 If you want to view the Gentoo Handbook (either from-CD or online) during the
633 installation, make sure you have created a user account (see <uri
634 link="#useraccounts">Optional: User Accounts</uri>). Then press <c>Alt-F2</c> to
635 go to a new terminal and log in.
636 </p>
637
638 <p>
639 If you want to view the documentation on the CD you can immediately run
640 <c>links2</c> to read it:
641 </p>
642
643 <pre caption="Viewing the on-CD documentation">
644 # <i>links2 /mnt/cdrom/docs/html/index.html</i>
645 </pre>
646
647 <p>
648 However, it is preferred that you use the online Gentoo Handbook as it will be
649 more recent than the one provided on the CD. You can view it using <c>links2</c>
650 as well, but only after having completed the <e>Configuring your Network</e>
651 chapter (otherwise you won't be able to go on the Internet to view the
652 document):
653 </p>
654
655 <pre caption="Viewing the Online Documentation">
656 # <i>links2 http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-ppc64.xml</i>
657 </pre>
658
659 <p>
660 You can go back to your original terminal by pressing <c>Alt-F1</c>.
661 </p>
662
663 </body>
664 </subsection>
665 <subsection>
666 <title>Optional: Starting the SSH Daemon</title>
667 <body>
668
669 <p>
670 If you want to allow other users to access your computer during the
671 Gentoo installation (perhaps because those users are going to help you
672 install Gentoo, or even do it for you), you need to create a user
673 account for them and perhaps even provide them with your root password
674 (<e>only</e> do that <e>if</e> you <b>fully trust</b> that user).
675 </p>
676
677 <p>
678 To fire up the SSH daemon, execute the following command:
679 </p>
680
681 <pre caption="Starting the SSH daemon">
682 # <i>/etc/init.d/sshd start</i>
683 </pre>
684
685 <p>
686 To be able to use sshd, you first need to set up your networking. Continue with
687 the chapter on <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=3">Configuring your Network</uri>.
688 </p>
689
690 </body>
691 </subsection>
692 </section>
693 </sections>

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