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1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3
4 <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/1.0 -->
6
7 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-ppc64-medium.xml,v 1.7 2004/11/02 10:55:17 swift Exp $ -->
8
9 <sections>
10 <section>
11 <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
12 <subsection>
13 <title>Introduction</title>
14 <body>
15
16 <p>
17 Before we start, we first list what hardware requirements you need to
18 successfully install Gentoo on your box. This of course depends on your
19 architecture.
20 </p>
21
22 </body>
23 </subsection>
24 <subsection>
25 <title>The PPC64 Architecture</title>
26 <body>
27
28 <p>
29 Check the following requirements before you continue with the Gentoo
30 installation:
31 </p>
32
33 <ul>
34 <li>
35 You need at least 1 Gb of free disk space
36 </li>
37 <li>
38 You need at least 300 Mb of memory (RAM + swap)
39 </li>
40 <li>
41 For the <e>PowerPC64 architecture</e>, you can install Gentoo/PPC64 on
42 machines having a PowerPC64 microprocessor, including IBM RS/6000s,
43 Power Macintosh G5 systems, IBM pSeries (and soon IBM iSeries) boxen.
44 For a full list go to <uri>http://www.linuxppc64.org/hardware.shtml</uri>.
45 </li>
46 </ul>
47
48 </body>
49 </subsection>
50 </section>
51 <section>
52 <title>Make your Choice</title>
53 <subsection>
54 <title>Introduction</title>
55 <body>
56
57 <p>
58 Still interested in trying out Gentoo? Well, then it is now time to
59 choose the installation medium you want to use. Yes, you have the
60 choice, no, they are not all equal, and yes, the result is always the same: a
61 Gentoo base system.
62 </p>
63
64 <p>
65 The installation media we will describe are:
66 </p>
67
68 <ul>
69 <li>Gentoo's Minimal LiveCD for Apple's G5</li>
70 <li>Gentoo's Minimal LiveCD for IBM pSeries RS/6000</li>
71 </ul>
72
73 <p>
74 As you can see there are no Universal CDs at the moment, but they will
75 follow. The consequence of this is that you have to download the stages
76 (see next paragraph) separately.
77 </p>
78
79 </body>
80 </subsection>
81 <subsection>
82 <title>The Three Stages</title>
83 <body>
84
85 <p>
86 Gentoo Linux can be installed using one of three <e>stage</e> tarball files.
87 The one you choose depends on how much of the system you want to compile
88 yourself. The <e>stage1</e> tarball is used when you want to bootstrap and
89 build the entire system from scratch. The <e>stage2</e> tarball is used for
90 building the entire system from a bootstrapped &quot;semi-compiled&quot; state.
91 The <e>stage3</e> tarball already contains a basic Gentoo Linux system that has
92 been built for you. As we will explain later, you can also install
93 Gentoo without compiling anything (except your kernel and some optional
94 packages). If you want this, you have to use a <e>stage3</e> tarball.
95 </p>
96
97 <p>
98 Now what stage do you have to choose?
99 </p>
100
101 <p>
102 Starting from a <e>stage1</e> allows you to have total control over the
103 optimization settings and optional build-time functionality that is
104 initially enabled on your system. This makes <e>stage1</e> installs good for
105 power users who know what they are doing. It is also a great
106 installation method for those who would like to know more about the
107 inner workings of Gentoo Linux.
108 </p>
109
110 <p>
111 A <e>stage1</e> installation can only be performed when you have a working
112 Internet connection.
113 </p>
114
115 <table>
116 <tr>
117 <th>Stage1</th>
118 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
119 </tr>
120 <tr>
121 <th>+</th>
122 <ti>
123 Allows you to have total control over the optimization settings and optional
124 build-time functionality that is initially enabled on your system
125 </ti>
126 </tr>
127 <tr>
128 <th>+</th>
129 <ti>Suitable for powerusers that know what they are doing</ti>
130 </tr>
131 <tr>
132 <th>+</th>
133 <ti>Allows you to learn more about the inner workings of Gentoo</ti>
134 </tr>
135 <tr>
136 <th>-</th>
137 <ti>Takes a long time to finish the installation</ti>
138 </tr>
139 <tr>
140 <th>-</th>
141 <ti>
142 If you don't intend to tweak the settings, it is probably a waste of time
143 </ti>
144 </tr>
145 <tr>
146 <th>-</th>
147 <ti>
148 Not suitable for networkless installations
149 </ti>
150 </tr>
151 </table>
152
153 <p>
154 <e>Stage2</e> installs allow you to skip the bootstrap process and doing this
155 is fine if you are happy with the optimization settings that we chose
156 for your particular <e>stage2</e> tarball.
157 </p>
158
159 <p>
160 A <e>stage2</e> installation can only be performed when you have a working
161 Internet connection.
162 </p>
163
164 <table>
165 <tr>
166 <th>Stage2</th>
167 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
168 </tr>
169 <tr>
170 <th>+</th>
171 <ti>You don't need to bootstrap</ti>
172 </tr>
173 <tr>
174 <th>+</th>
175 <ti>Faster than starting with stage1</ti>
176 </tr>
177 <tr>
178 <th>+</th>
179 <ti>You can still tweak your settings</ti>
180 </tr>
181 <tr>
182 <th>-</th>
183 <ti>You cannot tweak as much as with a stage1</ti>
184 </tr>
185 <tr>
186 <th>-</th>
187 <ti>It's not the fastest way to install Gentoo</ti>
188 </tr>
189 <tr>
190 <th>-</th>
191 <ti>You have to accept the optimizations we chose for the bootstrap</ti>
192 </tr>
193 <tr>
194 <th>-</th>
195 <ti>
196 Not suitable for networkless installations
197 </ti>
198 </tr>
199 </table>
200
201 <p>
202 Choosing to go with a <e>stage3</e> allows for the fastest install of Gentoo
203 Linux, but also means that your base system will have the optimization
204 settings that we chose for you (which to be honest, are good settings
205 and were carefully chosen to enhance performance while maintaining
206 stability). <e>stage3</e> is also required if you want to install Gentoo using
207 prebuilt packages or without a network connection.
208 </p>
209
210 <table>
211 <tr>
212 <th>Stage3</th>
213 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
214 </tr>
215 <tr>
216 <th>+</th>
217 <ti>Fastest way to get a Gentoo base system</ti>
218 </tr>
219 <tr>
220 <th>+</th>
221 <ti>Suitable for networkless installations</ti>
222 </tr>
223 <tr>
224 <th>-</th>
225 <ti>You cannot tweak the base system - it's built already</ti>
226 </tr>
227 <tr>
228 <th>-</th>
229 <ti>You cannot brag about having used stage1 or stage2</ti>
230 </tr>
231 </table>
232
233 <p>
234 Write down (or remember) what stage you want to use. You need this later when
235 you decide what LiveCD (or other installation medium) you want to use. You might
236 be interested to know that, if you decide to use different optimization settings
237 after having installed Gentoo, you will be able to recompile your entire system
238 with the new optimization settings.
239 </p>
240
241 <p>
242 Now take a look at the available installation media.
243 </p>
244
245 </body>
246 </subsection>
247 <subsection>
248 <title>Gentoo LiveCDs</title>
249 <body>
250
251 <p>
252 The <e>Gentoo LiveCDs</e> are bootable CDs which contain a
253 self-sustained Gentoo environment. They allow you to boot Linux from the CD.
254 During the boot process your hardware is detected and the appropriate drivers
255 are loaded. They are maintained by Gentoo developers.
256 </p>
257
258 <p>
259 All LiveCDs allow you to boot, set up networking, initialize your
260 partitions and start installing Gentoo from the Internet. However, some
261 LiveCDs also contain all necessary source code so you are able to install
262 Gentoo without a working network configuration.
263 </p>
264
265 <p>
266 Now what do these LiveCDs contain?
267 </p>
268
269 </body>
270 </subsection>
271 <subsection>
272 <title>Gentoo's Minimal LiveCD</title>
273 <body>
274
275 <p>
276 This is a small, no-nonsense, bootable CD which sole purpose is to boot the
277 system, prepare the networking and continue with the Gentoo installation. It
278 does not contain any stages (or, in some cases, a single stage1 file),
279 source code or precompiled packages. For example the ppc variant of this
280 LiveCD can be found in the <path>universal</path> subdirectory and is called
281 <c>install-ppc-minimal-2004.1.iso</c>.
282 </p>
283
284 <table>
285 <tr>
286 <th>Minimal LiveCD</th>
287 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
288 </tr>
289 <tr>
290 <th>+</th>
291 <ti>Smallest download</ti>
292 </tr>
293 <tr>
294 <th>+</th>
295 <ti>Suitable for a complete architecture</ti>
296 </tr>
297 <tr>
298 <th>+</th>
299 <ti>
300 You can do a stage1, stage2 or stage3 by getting the stage tarball off the
301 net
302 </ti>
303 </tr>
304 <tr>
305 <th>-</th>
306 <ti>
307 Contains no stages, no Portage snapshot, no GRP packages and therefore not
308 suitable for networkless installation
309 </ti>
310 </tr>
311 </table>
312
313 </body>
314 </subsection>
315 <!--
316 <subsection>
317 <title>Gentoo's Universal LiveCD (not available at the moment for
318 PPC64)</title>
319 <body>
320
321 <p>
322 Gentoo's Universal LiveCD is a bootable CD suitable to install Gentoo without
323 networking. It contains a stage1 and several stage3 tarballs (optimized for the
324 individual subarchitectures). For example the ppc variant of this CD is called
325 <c>install-ppc-universal-2004.1.iso</c> and can be found in the
326 <path>universal</path> subdirectory.
327 </p>
328
329 <p>
330 If you take a closer look on our mirrors, you will see
331 that we provide <e>Gentoo Package CDs</e>. This CD (which isn't
332 bootable) only contains precompiled packages and can be used to install software
333 after a succesfull Gentoo Installation. To install Gentoo, you only
334 need the Universal LiveCD, but if you want OpenOffice.org, Mozilla, KDE, GNOME
335 etc. without having to compile every single one of them, you need the Packages
336 CD too. For example the G4 (a subarchitecture of ppc) Packages CD is
337 called <c>packages-g4-2004.1.iso</c> and can be found in the appropriate
338 subdirectory (<path>g4/</path>).
339 </p>
340
341 <p>
342 You only need the Packages CD if you want to perform a stage3 with GRP
343 installation.
344 </p>
345
346 <table>
347 <tr>
348 <th>Universal LiveCD with Packages CD</th>
349 <th>Pros and Cons</th>
350 </tr>
351 <tr>
352 <th>+</th>
353 <ti>Packages CD is optimized to your architecture and subarchitecture</ti>
354 </tr>
355 <tr>
356 <th>+</th>
357 <ti>
358 Packages CD provides precompiled packages for fast Gentoo installations
359 </ti>
360 </tr>
361 <tr>
362 <th>+</th>
363 <ti>
364 Contains everything you need. You can even install without a network
365 connection.
366 </ti>
367 </tr>
368 <tr>
369 <th>-</th>
370 <ti>Huge download</ti>
371 </tr>
372 </table>
373
374 </body>
375 </subsection>
376 -->
377 </section>
378 <section>
379 <title>Download, Burn and Boot a Gentoo LiveCD</title>
380 <subsection>
381 <title>Downloading and Burning the LiveCDs</title>
382 <body>
383
384 <p>
385 You have chosen to use a Gentoo LiveCD (if not, then you are reading the
386 wrong section). We'll first start by downloading and burning the chosen
387 LiveCD. We previously discussed the several available LiveCDs, but where can you
388 find them?
389 </p>
390
391 <p>
392 Visit one of our <uri
393 link="/main/en/mirrors.xml">mirrors</uri> and go to
394 <path>experimental/ppc64/livecd</path>, which is
395 the path where the LiveCD(s) of your choice are located. Inside that
396 directory you'll find so-called ISO-files. Those are full CD images
397 which you can write on a CD-R.
398 </p>
399
400 <p>
401 In case you wonder if your downloaded file is corrupted or not, you can check
402 its MD5 checksum and compare it with the MD5 checksum we provide (such as
403 <path>install-ppc64-minimal-2004.2.iso.md5</path>). You can check the MD5
404 checksum with the <c>md5sum</c> tool under Linux/Unix or <uri
405 link="http://www.etree.org/md5com.html">md5sum</uri> for Windows.
406 </p>
407
408 <p>
409 As long as Mac OS X does not support <c>md5sum</c> you have to use the md5
410 capability of <c>openssl</c>.
411 </p>
412
413 <pre caption="md5sum with the help of openssl">
414 $ <i>openssl md5 /path/to/iso</i>
415 <comment>(This could take some time depending on the size of the ISO and your CPU)</comment>
416 </pre>
417
418 <p>
419 Now compare this output with the appropriate file found on the server where you
420 downloaded the ISO (the file will end with .md5). If it is the same, the ISO
421 image downloaded correctly. Be sure you have not mounted it (e.g. with Disk
422 Copy) yet!
423 </p>
424
425 <p>
426 More information is available in our <uri
427 link="/doc/en/gentoo-ppc-faq.xml">Gentoo/PPC FAQ</uri>.
428 </p>
429
430 <p>
431 To burn the downloaded ISO(s), you have to select raw-burning. How you
432 do this is highly program-dependent. We will discuss <c>cdrecord</c>,
433 <c>k3b</c> and the MacOS burning possibilities here; more information can
434 be found in our <uri link="/doc/en/faq.xml#isoburning">Gentoo FAQ</uri> and
435 the <uri link="/doc/en/gentoo-ppc-faq.xml">PPC FAQ</uri>.
436 </p>
437
438 <ul>
439 <li>
440 With cdrecord, you simply type <c>cdrecord dev=/dev/hdc</c> (replace
441 <path>/dev/hdc</path> with your CD-RW drive's device path) followed
442 by the path to the ISO file :)
443 </li>
444 <li>
445 With k3b, select <c>Tools</c> &gt; <c>CD</c> &gt; <c>Burn Image</c>. Then
446 you can locate your ISO file within the 'Image to Burn' area. Finally click
447 <c>Start</c>.
448 </li>
449 <li>
450 With Mac OS X Panther, launch <c>Disk Utility</c> from
451 <path>Applications/Utilities</path>, select <c>Open</c> from the
452 <c>Images</c> menu, select the mounted disk image in the main window and
453 select <c>Burn</c> in the <c>Images</c> menu.
454 </li>
455 <li>
456 With Mac OS X Jaguar, launch <c>Disk Copy</c> from
457 <path>Applications/Utilities</path>, select <c>Burn Image</c> from the
458 <c>File</c> menu, select the ISO and click the <c>Burn</c> button.
459 </li>
460 </ul>
461
462 </body>
463 </subsection>
464 </section>
465 <section>
466 <title>Booting the PPC LiveCD(s)</title>
467 <subsection>
468 <title>Default: Apple/IBM</title>
469 <body>
470
471 <p>
472 Place the LiveCD in the CD-ROM and reboot the system. Hold down the 'C' key at
473 bootup. You will be greeted by a friendly welcome message and a <e>boot:</e>
474 prompt at the bottom of the screen.
475 </p>
476
477 <p>
478 You are also able to tweak some kernel options at this prompt. The following
479 table lists the available boot options you can add:
480 </p>
481
482 <table>
483 <tr>
484 <th>Boot Option</th>
485 <th>Description</th>
486 </tr>
487 <tr>
488 <ti><c>video</c></ti>
489 <ti>
490 This option takes one of the following vendor-specific tags:
491 <c>radeonfb</c>, <c>rivafb</c>, <c>atyfb</c>, <c>aty128</c> or
492 <c>ofonly</c>. You can follow this tag with the resolution and refreshrate
493 you want to use. For instance <c>video=radeonfb:1280x1024@75</c>. If you are
494 uncertain what to choose, <c>ofonly</c> will most certainly work.
495 </ti>
496 </tr>
497 <tr>
498 <ti><c>nol3</c></ti>
499 <ti>
500 Disables level 3 cache on some powerbooks (needed for at least the 17'')
501 </ti>
502 </tr>
503 <tr>
504 <ti><c>debug</c></ti>
505 <ti>
506 Enables verbose booting, spawns an initrd shell that can be used to debug
507 the LiveCD
508 </ti>
509 </tr>
510 <tr>
511 <ti><c>sleep=X</c></ti>
512 <ti>
513 Wait X seconds before continuing; this can be needed by some very old SCSI
514 CD-ROMs which don't speed up the CD quick enough
515 </ti>
516 </tr>
517 <tr>
518 <ti><c>bootfrom=X</c></ti>
519 <ti>
520 Boot from a different device
521 </ti>
522 </tr>
523 </table>
524
525 <p>
526 At this prompt, hit enter, and a complete Gentoo Linux environment will be
527 loaded from the CD. Continue with <uri link="#booted">And When You're
528 Booted...</uri>.
529 </p>
530
531 </body>
532 </subsection>
533 <subsection>
534 <title>IBM pSeries</title>
535 <body>
536
537 <p>
538 For pSeries boxes, sometimes the cds might not autoboot. You might have
539 to set up your cdrom as a bootable device in the multi-boot menu. (F1 at
540 startup) The other option is to jump into OF and do it from there:
541 </p>
542
543 <p>
544 1) Boot into OF (this is 8 from the serial cons or F8 from a graphics
545 cons, start hitting the key when you see the keyboard mouse etc etc
546 messages
547 </p>
548 <p>
549 2) run the command 0> boot cdrom:1,yaboot
550 </p>
551 <p>
552 3) stand back and enjoy!
553 </p>
554
555 </body>
556 </subsection>
557 <subsection id="booted">
558 <title>And When You're Booted...</title>
559 <body>
560
561 <p>
562 You will be greeted by a root ("#") prompt on the current console. You can also
563 switch to other consoles by pressing Alt-fn-F2, Alt-fn-F3 and Alt-fn-F4. Get
564 back to the one you started on by pressing Alt-fn-F1.
565 </p>
566
567 <p>
568 If you are installing Gentoo on a system with a non-US keyboard, use
569 <c>loadkeys</c> to load the keymap for your keyboard. To list the available
570 keymaps, execute <c>ls /usr/share/keymaps/i386</c>.
571 </p>
572
573 <pre caption="Listing available keymaps">
574 <comment>(PPC uses x86 keymaps on most systems. The mac/ppc keymaps provided
575 on the LiveCD are ADB keymaps and unusable with the LiveCD kernel)</comment>
576 # <i>ls /usr/share/keymaps/i386</i>
577 </pre>
578
579 <p>
580 Now load the keymap of your choice:
581 </p>
582
583 <pre caption="Loading a keymap">
584 # <i>loadkeys be-latin1</i>
585 </pre>
586
587 <p>
588 Now continue with <uri link="#hardware">Extra Hardware Configuration</uri>.
589 </p>
590
591 </body>
592 </subsection>
593 <subsection id="hardware">
594 <title>Extra Hardware Configuration</title>
595 <body>
596
597 <p>
598 When the Live CD boots, it tries to detect all your hardware devices and
599 loads the appropriate kernel modules to support your hardware. In the
600 vast majority of cases, it does a very good job. However, in some cases (the
601 SPARC LiveCDs don't even do autodetection), it may not auto-load the kernel
602 modules you need. If the PCI auto-detection missed some of your system's
603 hardware, you will have to load the appropriate kernel modules manually.
604 </p>
605
606 <p>
607 In the next example we try to load the <c>8139too</c> module (support for
608 certain kinds of network interfaces):
609 </p>
610
611 <pre caption="Loading kernel modules">
612 # <i>modprobe 8139too</i>
613 </pre>
614
615 </body>
616 </subsection>
617 <subsection>
618 <title>Optional: Tweaking Hard Disk Performance</title>
619 <body>
620
621 <p>
622 If you are an advanced user, you might want to tweak the IDE hard disk
623 performance using <c>hdparm</c>. With the <c>-tT</c> options you can
624 test the performance of your disk (execute it several times to get a
625 more precise impression):
626 </p>
627
628 <pre caption="Testing disk performance">
629 # <i>hdparm -tT /dev/hda</i>
630 </pre>
631
632 <p>
633 To tweak, you can use any of the following examples (or experiment
634 yourself) which use <path>/dev/hda</path> as disk (substitute with your
635 disk):
636 </p>
637
638 <pre caption="Tweaking hard disk performance">
639 <comment>Activate DMA:</comment> # <i>hdparm -d 1 /dev/hda</i>
640 <comment>Activate DMA + Safe Performance-enhancing Options:</comment> # <i>hdparm -d 1 -A 1 -m 16 -u 1 -a 64 /dev/hda</i>
641 </pre>
642
643 </body>
644 </subsection>
645 <subsection id="useraccounts">
646 <title>Optional: User Accounts</title>
647 <body>
648
649 <p>
650 If you plan on giving other people access to your installation
651 environment or you want to chat using <c>irssi</c> without root privileges (for
652 security reasons), you need to create the necessary user accounts and change
653 the root password.
654 </p>
655
656 <p>
657 To change the root password, use the <c>passwd</c> utility:
658 </p>
659
660 <pre caption="Changing the root password">
661 # <i>passwd</i>
662 New password: <comment>(Enter your new password)</comment>
663 Re-enter password: <comment>(Re-enter your password)</comment>
664 </pre>
665
666 <p>
667 To create a user account, we first enter their credentials, followed by
668 its password. We use <c>useradd</c> and <c>passwd</c> for these tasks.
669 In the next example, we create a user called &quot;john&quot;.
670 </p>
671
672 <pre caption="Creating a user account">
673 # <i>useradd -m -G users john</i>
674 # <i>passwd john</i>
675 New password: <comment>(Enter john's password)</comment>
676 Re-enter password: <comment>(Re-enter john's password)</comment>
677 </pre>
678
679 <p>
680 You can change your user id from root to the newly created user by using
681 <c>su</c>:
682 </p>
683
684 <pre caption="Changing user id">
685 # <i>su - john</i>
686 </pre>
687
688 </body>
689 </subsection>
690 <subsection>
691 <title>Optional: Viewing Documentation while Installing</title>
692 <body>
693
694 <p>
695 If you want to view the Gentoo Handbook (either from-CD or online) during the
696 installation, make sure you have created a user account (see <uri
697 link="#useraccouts">Optional: User Accounts</uri>). Then press <c>Alt-F2</c> to
698 go to a new terminal and log in.
699 </p>
700
701 <p>
702 If you want to view the documentation on the CD you can immediately run
703 <c>links2</c> to read it:
704 </p>
705
706 <pre caption="Viewing the on-CD documentation">
707 # <i>links2 /mnt/cdrom/docs/html/index.html</i>
708 </pre>
709
710 <p>
711 However, it is preferred that you use the online Gentoo Handbook as it will be
712 more recent than the one provided on the CD. You can view it using <c>links2</c>
713 as well, but only after having completed the <e>Configuring your Network</e>
714 chapter (otherwise you won't be able to go on the Internet to view the
715 document):
716 </p>
717
718 <pre caption="Viewing the Online Documentation">
719 # <i>links2 http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-ppc64.xml</i>
720 </pre>
721
722 <p>
723 You can go back to your original terminal by pressing <c>Alt-F1</c>.
724 </p>
725
726 </body>
727 </subsection>
728 <subsection>
729 <title>Optional: Starting the SSH Daemon</title>
730 <body>
731
732 <p>
733 If you want to allow other users to access your computer during the
734 Gentoo installation (perhaps because those users are going to help you
735 install Gentoo, or even do it for you), you need to create a user
736 account for them and perhaps even provide them with your root password
737 (<e>only</e> do that <e>if</e> you <b>fully trust</b> that user).
738 </p>
739
740 <p>
741 To fire up the SSH daemon, execute the following command:
742 </p>
743
744 <pre caption="Starting the SSH daemon">
745 # <i>/etc/init.d/sshd start</i>
746 </pre>
747
748 <p>
749 To be able to use sshd, you first need to set up your networking. Continue with
750 the chapter on <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=3">Configuring your Network</uri>.
751 </p>
752
753 </body>
754 </subsection>
755 </section>
756 </sections>

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