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1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3
4 <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6
7 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-x86+amd64-bootloader.xml,v 1.21 2010/07/20 05:14:55 nightmorph Exp $ -->
8
9 <sections>
10
11 <version>7</version>
12 <date>2011-04-14</date>
13
14 <section>
15 <title>Making your Choice</title>
16 <subsection>
17 <title>Introduction</title>
18 <body>
19
20 <p>
21 Now that your kernel is configured and compiled and the necessary system
22 configuration files are filled in correctly, it is time to install a
23 program that will fire up your kernel when you start the system. Such a
24 program is called a <e>bootloader</e>.
25 </p>
26
27 </body>
28 <body test="contains('AMD64 x86', func:keyval('arch'))">
29 <p>
30 For <keyval id="arch"/>, Gentoo Linux provides <uri
31 link="#grub">GRUB</uri> and <uri link="#lilo">LILO</uri>.
32 </p>
33
34 </body>
35 <body>
36 <p>
37 But before we install the bootloader, we inform you how to configure
38 framebuffer (assuming you want it of course). With framebuffer you can run the
39 Linux command line with (limited) graphical features (such as using the nice
40 bootsplash image Gentoo provides).
41 </p>
42
43 </body>
44 </subsection>
45 <subsection>
46 <title>Optional: Framebuffer</title>
47 <body>
48
49 <p>
50 <e>If</e> you have configured your kernel with framebuffer support (or you used
51 <c>genkernel</c> default kernel configuration), you can activate it by adding a
52 a <c>video</c> statement to your bootloader configuration file.
53 </p>
54
55 <p>
56 First of all, you need to know your framebuffer device. You should have used
57 <c>uvesafb</c> as the <e>VESA driver</e>.
58 </p>
59
60 <p>
61 The <c>video</c> statement controls framebuffer display options. It needs to be
62 given the framebuffer driver followed by the control statements you wish to
63 enable. All variables are listed in
64 <path>/usr/src/linux/Documentation/fb/uvesafb.txt</path>. The most-used options
65 are:
66 </p>
67
68 <table>
69 <tr>
70 <th>Control</th>
71 <th>Description</th>
72 </tr>
73 <tr>
74 <ti>ywrap</ti>
75 <ti>
76 Assume that the graphical card can wrap around its memory (i.e. continue at
77 the beginning when it has approached the end)
78 </ti>
79 </tr>
80 <tr>
81 <ti>mtrr:<c>n</c></ti>
82 <ti>
83 Setup MTRR registers. <c>n</c> can be:<br/>
84 0 - disabled<br/>
85 1 - uncachable<br/>
86 2 - write-back<br/>
87 3 - write-combining<br/>
88 4 - write-through
89 </ti>
90 </tr>
91 <tr>
92 <ti><c>mode</c></ti>
93 <ti>
94 Set up the resolution, color depth and refresh rate. For instance,
95 <c>1024x768-32@85</c> for a resolution of 1024x768, 32 bit color depth and a
96 refresh rate of 85 Hz.
97 </ti>
98 </tr>
99 </table>
100
101 <p>
102 The result could be something like
103 <c>video=uvesafb:mtrr:3,ywrap,1024x768-32@85</c>. Write this setting down; you
104 will need it shortly.
105 </p>
106
107 <p test="func:keyval('arch')='IA64'">
108 Now, you should install the <uri link="#elilo">elilo bootloader</uri>.
109 </p>
110
111 <p test="not(func:keyval('arch')='IA64')">
112 Now continue by installing <uri link="#grub">GRUB</uri> <e>or</e> <uri
113 link="#lilo">LILO</uri>.
114 </p>
115
116 </body>
117 </subsection>
118 </section>
119 <section id="grub" test="contains('AMD64 x86',func:keyval('arch'))">
120 <title>Default: Using GRUB</title>
121 <subsection>
122 <title>Understanding GRUB's terminology</title>
123 <body>
124
125 <p>
126 The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how
127 GRUB refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition
128 <path>/dev/sda1</path> will most likely be called <path>(hd0,0)</path> under
129 GRUB. Notice the parentheses around the <path>hd0,0</path> - they are
130 required.
131 </p>
132
133 <p>
134 Hard drives count from zero rather than "a" and partitions start at zero
135 rather than one. Be aware too that with the hd devices, only hard drives are
136 counted, not atapi-ide devices such as cdrom players and burners. Also, the
137 same construct is used with SCSI drives. (Normally they get higher numbers
138 than IDE drives except when the BIOS is configured to boot from SCSI devices.)
139 When you ask the BIOS to boot from a different hard disk (for instance your
140 primary slave), <e>that</e> harddisk is seen as <path>hd0</path>.
141 </p>
142
143 <p>
144 Assuming you have a hard drive on <path>/dev/sda</path> and two more on
145 <path>/dev/sdb</path> and <path>/dev/sdc</path>, <path>/dev/sdb7</path> gets
146 translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>. It might sound tricky and tricky it is
147 indeed, but as we will see, GRUB offers a tab completion mechanism that comes
148 handy for those of you having a lot of hard drives and partitions and who are a
149 little lost in the GRUB numbering scheme.
150 </p>
151
152 <p>
153 Having gotten the feel for that, it is time to install GRUB.
154 </p>
155
156 </body>
157 </subsection>
158 <subsection>
159 <title>Installing GRUB</title>
160 <body>
161
162 <p>
163 To install GRUB, let's first emerge it:
164 </p>
165
166 <impo test="func:keyval('arch')='AMD64'">
167 If you are using a non-multilib <uri
168 link="?part=1&amp;chap=6#doc_chap2">profile</uri>, you should <b>not</b> emerge
169 <c>grub</c>, but instead you should emerge <c>grub-static</c>. If you plan to
170 use a non-multilib profile <e>and</e> you have <b>disabled</b> IA-32 emulation
171 in your kernel, then you should use <c>lilo</c>.
172 </impo>
173
174 <pre caption="Installing GRUB">
175 # <i>emerge grub</i>
176 </pre>
177
178 <p>
179 Although GRUB is now installed, we still need to write up a
180 configuration file for it and place GRUB in our MBR so that GRUB automatically
181 boots your newly created kernel. Create <path>/boot/grub/grub.conf</path> with
182 <c>nano</c> (or, if applicable, another editor):
183 </p>
184
185 <pre caption="Creating /boot/grub/grub.conf">
186 # <i>nano -w /boot/grub/grub.conf</i>
187 </pre>
188
189 <p>
190 Now we are going to write up a <path>grub.conf</path>. Below you'll find two
191 possible <path>grub.conf</path> for the partitioning example we use in this
192 guide. We've only extensively commented the first <path>grub.conf</path>. Make
193 sure you use <e>your</e> kernel image filename and, if appropriate, <e>your</e>
194 initrd image filename.
195 </p>
196
197 <ul>
198 <li>
199 The first <path>grub.conf</path> is for people who have not used
200 <c>genkernel</c> to build their kernel
201 </li>
202 <li>
203 The second <path>grub.conf</path> is for people who have used
204 <c>genkernel</c> to build their kernel
205 </li>
206 </ul>
207
208 <note>
209 Grub assigns device designations from the BIOS. If you change your BIOS
210 settings, your device letters and numbers may change, too. For example, if you
211 change your device boot order, you may need to change your grub configuration.
212 </note>
213
214 <note>
215 If your root filesystem is JFS, you <e>must</e> add " ro" to the <c>kernel</c>
216 line since JFS needs to replay its log before it allows read-write mounting.
217 </note>
218
219 <pre caption="grub.conf for non-genkernel users">
220 <comment># Which listing to boot as default. 0 is the first, 1 the second etc.</comment>
221 default 0
222 <comment># How many seconds to wait before the default listing is booted.</comment>
223 timeout 30
224 <comment># Nice, fat splash-image to spice things up :)
225 # Comment out if you don't have a graphics card installed</comment>
226 splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
227
228 title Gentoo Linux <keyval id="kernel-version"/>
229 <comment># Partition where the kernel image (or operating system) is located</comment>
230 root (hd0,0)
231 kernel /boot/<keyval id="kernel-name"/> root=/dev/sda3
232
233 title Gentoo Linux <keyval id="kernel-version"/> (rescue)
234 <comment># Partition where the kernel image (or operating system) is located</comment>
235 root (hd0,0)
236 kernel /boot/<keyval id="kernel-name"/> root=/dev/sda3 init=/bin/bb
237
238 <comment># The next four lines are only if you dualboot with a Windows system.</comment>
239 <comment># In this case, Windows is hosted on /dev/sda6.</comment>
240 title Windows XP
241 rootnoverify (hd0,5)
242 makeactive
243 chainloader +1
244 </pre>
245
246 <pre caption="grub.conf for genkernel users">
247 default 0
248 timeout 30
249 splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
250
251 title Gentoo Linux <keyval id="kernel-version"/>
252 root (hd0,0)
253 kernel /boot/<keyval id="genkernel-name"/> real_root=/dev/sda3
254 initrd /boot/<keyval id="genkernel-initrd"/>
255
256 <comment># Only in case you want to dual-boot</comment>
257 title Windows XP
258 rootnoverify (hd0,5)
259 makeactive
260 chainloader +1
261 </pre>
262
263 <p>
264 If you used a different partitioning scheme and/or kernel image, adjust
265 accordingly. However, make sure that anything that follows a GRUB-device (such
266 as <path>(hd0,0)</path>) is relative to the mountpoint, not the root. In other
267 words, <path>(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz</path> is in reality
268 <path>/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz</path> since <path>(hd0,0)</path> is
269 <path>/boot</path>.
270 </p>
271
272 <p>
273 Besides, if you chose to use a different partitioning scheme and did not put
274 <path>/boot</path> in a separate partition, the <path>/boot</path> prefix used
275 in the above code samples is really <e>required</e>. If you followed our
276 suggested partitioning plan, the <path>/boot</path> prefix it not required, but
277 a <path>boot</path> symlink makes it work. In short, the above examples should
278 work whether you defined a separate <path>/boot</path> partition or not.
279 </p>
280
281 <p>
282 If you need to pass any additional options to the kernel, simply add them to the
283 end of the kernel command. We're already passing one option
284 (<c>root=/dev/sda3</c> or <c>real_root=/dev/sda3</c>), but you can pass others
285 as well, such as the <c>video</c> statement for framebuffer as we discussed
286 previously.
287 </p>
288
289 <p>
290 If your bootloader configuration file contains the real_root parameter, use the
291 real_rootflags parameter to set root filesystem mount options.
292 </p>
293
294 <p>
295 If you're using a 2.6.7 or higher kernel and you jumpered your harddrive
296 because the BIOS can't handle large harddrives you'll need to append
297 <c>sda=stroke</c>. Replace sda with the device that requires this option.
298 </p>
299
300 <p>
301 <c>genkernel</c> users should know that their kernels use the same boot options
302 as is used for the Installation CD. For instance, if you have SCSI devices, you
303 should add <c>doscsi</c> as kernel option.
304 </p>
305
306 <p>
307 Now save the <path>grub.conf</path> file and exit. You still need to install
308 GRUB in the MBR (Master Boot Record) so that GRUB is automatically executed when
309 you boot your system.
310 </p>
311
312 <p>
313 The GRUB developers recommend the use of <c>grub-install</c>. However, if for
314 some reason <c>grub-install</c> fails to work correctly you still have the
315 option to manually install GRUB.
316 </p>
317
318 <p>
319 Continue with <uri link="#grub-install-auto">Default: Setting up GRUB using
320 grub-install</uri> or <uri link="#grub-install-manual">Alternative: Setting up
321 GRUB using manual instructions</uri>.
322 </p>
323
324 </body>
325 </subsection>
326 <subsection id="grub-install-auto">
327 <title>Default: Setting up GRUB using grub-install</title>
328 <body>
329
330 <p>
331 To install GRUB you will need to issue the <c>grub-install</c> command.
332 However, <c>grub-install</c> won't work off-the-shelf since we are inside a
333 chrooted environment. We need to create <path>/etc/mtab</path> which lists all
334 mounted filesystems. Fortunately, there is an easy way to accomplish this -
335 just copy over <path>/proc/mounts</path> to <path>/etc/mtab</path>, excluding
336 the <c>rootfs</c> line if you haven't created a separate boot partition. The
337 following command will work in both cases:
338 </p>
339
340 <pre caption="Creating /etc/mtab">
341 # <i>grep -v rootfs /proc/mounts &gt; /etc/mtab</i>
342 </pre>
343
344 <p>
345 Now we can install GRUB using <c>grub-install</c>:
346 </p>
347
348 <pre caption="Running grub-install">
349 # <i>grub-install --no-floppy /dev/sda</i>
350 </pre>
351
352 <p>
353 If you have more questions regarding GRUB, please consult the <uri
354 link="http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/grub-faq.html">GRUB FAQ</uri>, the <uri
355 link="http://grub.enbug.org/GrubLegacy">GRUB Wiki</uri>, or read <c>info
356 grub</c> in your terminal.
357 </p>
358
359 <p>
360 Continue with <uri link="#reboot">Rebooting the System</uri>.
361 </p>
362
363 </body>
364 </subsection>
365 <subsection id="grub-install-manual">
366 <title>Alternative: Setting up GRUB using manual instructions</title>
367 <body>
368
369 <p>
370 To start configuring GRUB, you type in <c>grub</c>. You'll be presented
371 with the <path>grub&gt;</path> grub command-line prompt. Now, you need to type
372 in the right commands to install the GRUB boot record onto your hard drive.
373 </p>
374
375 <pre caption="Starting the GRUB shell">
376 # <i>grub --no-floppy</i>
377 </pre>
378
379 <note>
380 If your system does not have any floppy drives, add the <c>--no-floppy</c>
381 option to the above command to prevent grub from probing the (non-existing)
382 floppy drives.
383 </note>
384
385 <p>
386 In the example configuration we want to install GRUB so that it reads its
387 information from the boot partition <path><keyval id="/boot"/></path>, and
388 installs the GRUB boot record on the hard drive's MBR (master boot record) so
389 that the first thing we see when we turn on the computer is the GRUB prompt. Of
390 course, if you haven't followed the example configuration during the
391 installation, change the commands accordingly.
392 </p>
393
394 <p>
395 The tab completion mechanism of GRUB can be used from within GRUB.
396 For instance, if you type in "<c>root (</c>" followed by a TAB, you will
397 be presented with a list of devices (such as <path>hd0</path>). If you
398 type in "<c>root (hd0,</c>" followed by a TAB, you will receive a list
399 of available partitions to choose from (such as <path>hd0,0</path>).
400 </p>
401
402 <p>
403 By using the tab completion, setting up GRUB should be not that hard.
404 Now go on, configure GRUB, shall we? :-)
405 </p>
406
407 <pre caption="Installing GRUB in the MBR">
408 grub&gt; <i>root (hd0,0)</i> <comment>(Specify where your /boot partition resides)</comment>
409 grub&gt; <i>setup (hd0)</i> <comment>(Install GRUB in the MBR)</comment>
410 grub&gt; <i>quit</i> <comment>(Exit the GRUB shell)</comment>
411 </pre>
412
413 <note>
414 If you want to install GRUB in a certain partition instead of the MBR,
415 you have to alter the <c>setup</c> command so it points to the right
416 partition. For instance, if you want GRUB installed in
417 <path>/dev/sda3</path>, then the command becomes <c>setup (hd0,2)</c>.
418 Few users however want to do this.
419 </note>
420
421 <p>
422 If you have more questions regarding GRUB, please consult the <uri
423 link="http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/grub-faq.html">GRUB FAQ</uri>, the <uri
424 link="http://grub.enbug.org/GrubLegacy">GRUB Wiki</uri>, or read <c>info
425 grub</c> in your terminal.
426 </p>
427
428 <p>
429 Continue with <uri link="#reboot">Rebooting the System</uri>.
430 </p>
431
432 </body>
433 </subsection>
434 </section>
435 <section id="lilo" test="contains('AMD64 x86', func:keyval('arch'))">
436 <title>Alternative: Using LILO</title>
437 <subsection>
438 <title>Installing LILO</title>
439 <body>
440
441 <p>
442 LILO, the LInuxLOader, is the tried and true workhorse of Linux
443 bootloaders. However, it lacks some features that GRUB has (which is
444 also the reason why GRUB is currently gaining popularity). The reason
445 why LILO is still used is that, on some systems, GRUB doesn't work and
446 LILO does. Of course, it is also used because some people know LILO and
447 want to stick with it. Either way, Gentoo supports both, and apparently
448 you have chosen to use LILO.
449 </p>
450
451 <p>
452 Installing LILO is a breeze; just use <c>emerge</c>.
453 </p>
454
455 <pre caption="Installing LILO">
456 # <i>emerge lilo</i>
457 </pre>
458
459 </body>
460 </subsection>
461 <subsection>
462 <title>Configuring LILO</title>
463 <body>
464
465 <p>
466 To configure LILO, you must create <path>/etc/lilo.conf</path>. Fire up
467 your favorite editor (in this handbook we use <c>nano</c> for
468 consistency) and create the file.
469 </p>
470
471 <pre caption="Creating /etc/lilo.conf">
472 # <i>nano -w /etc/lilo.conf</i>
473 </pre>
474
475 <p>
476 Some sections ago we have asked you to remember the kernel-image name
477 you have created. In the next example <path>lilo.conf</path> we use the
478 example partitioning scheme. There are two separate parts:
479 </p>
480
481 <ul>
482 <li>
483 One for those who have not used <c>genkernel</c> to build their kernel
484 </li>
485 <li>
486 One for those who have used <c>genkernel</c> to build their kernel
487 </li>
488 </ul>
489
490 <p>
491 Make sure you use <e>your</e> kernel image filename and, if appropriate,
492 <e>your</e> initrd image filename.
493 </p>
494
495 <note>
496 If your root filesystem is JFS, you <e>must</e> add a <c>append="ro"</c>
497 line after each boot item since JFS needs to replay its log before it allows
498 read-write mounting.
499 </note>
500
501 <pre caption="Example /etc/lilo.conf">
502 boot=/dev/sda <comment># Install LILO in the MBR</comment>
503 prompt <comment># Give the user the chance to select another section</comment>
504 timeout=50 <comment># Wait 5 (five) seconds before booting the default section</comment>
505 default=gentoo <comment># When the timeout has passed, boot the "gentoo" section</comment>
506
507 <comment># For non-genkernel users</comment>
508 image=/boot/<keyval id="kernel-name"/>
509 label=gentoo <comment># Name we give to this section</comment>
510 read-only <comment># Start with a read-only root. Do not alter!</comment>
511 root=/dev/sda3 <comment># Location of the root filesystem</comment>
512
513 image=/boot/<keyval id="kernel-name"/>
514 label=gentoo.rescue <comment># Name we give to this section</comment>
515 read-only <comment># Start with a read-only root. Do not alter!</comment>
516 root=/dev/sda3 <comment># Location of the root filesystem</comment>
517 append="init=/bin/bb" <comment># Launch the Gentoo static rescue shell</comment>
518
519 <comment># For genkernel users</comment>
520 image=/boot/<keyval id="genkernel-name"/>
521 label=gentoo
522 read-only
523 append="real_root=/dev/sda3"
524 initrd=/boot/<keyval id="genkernel-initrd"/>
525
526 <comment># The next two lines are only if you dualboot with a Windows system.</comment>
527 <comment># In this case, Windows is hosted on /dev/sda6.</comment>
528 other=/dev/sda6
529 label=windows
530 </pre>
531
532 <note>
533 If you use a different partitioning scheme and/or kernel image, adjust
534 accordingly.
535 </note>
536
537 <p>
538 If you need to pass any additional options to the kernel, add an
539 <c>append</c> statement to the section. As an example, we add the
540 <c>video</c> statement to enable framebuffer:
541 </p>
542
543 <pre caption="Using append to add kernel options">
544 image=/boot/<keyval id="kernel-name"/>
545 label=gentoo
546 read-only
547 root=/dev/sda3
548 <i>append="video=uvesafb:mtrr,ywrap,1024x768-32@85"</i>
549 </pre>
550
551 <p>
552 If you're using a 2.6.7 or higher kernel and you jumpered your harddrive
553 because the BIOS can't handle large harddrives you'll need to append
554 <c>sda=stroke</c>. Replace sda with the device that requires this option.
555 </p>
556
557 <p>
558 <c>genkernel</c> users should know that their kernels use the same boot options
559 as is used for the Installation CD. For instance, if you have SCSI devices, you
560 should add <c>doscsi</c> as kernel option.
561 </p>
562
563 <p>
564 Now save the file and exit. To finish up, you have to run <c>/sbin/lilo</c> so
565 LILO can apply the <path>/etc/lilo.conf</path> to your system (i.e. install
566 itself on the disk). Keep in mind that you'll also have to run
567 <c>/sbin/lilo</c> every time you install a new kernel or make any changes to
568 the menu.
569 </p>
570
571 <pre caption="Finishing the LILO installation">
572 # <i>/sbin/lilo</i>
573 </pre>
574
575 <p>
576 If you have more questions regarding LILO, please consult its <uri
577 link="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LILO_(boot_loader)">wikipedia page</uri>.
578 </p>
579
580 <p>
581 You can now continue with <uri link="#reboot">Rebooting the System</uri>.
582 </p>
583
584 </body>
585 </subsection>
586 </section>
587 <section id="elilo" test="func:keyval('arch')='IA64'">
588 <title>Default: Installing elilo</title>
589 <body>
590
591 <p>
592 On the IA64 platform, the boot loader is called <c>elilo</c>. You may need to
593 emerge it on your machine first.
594 </p>
595
596 <pre caption="Installing elilo">
597 # <i>emerge elilo</i>
598 </pre>
599
600 <p>
601 You can find the configuration file at <path>/etc/elilo.conf</path> and a
602 sample file in the typical docs dir
603 <path>/usr/share/doc/elilo-&lt;ver&gt;/</path>. Here is another sample
604 configuration:
605 </p>
606
607 <pre caption="/etc/elilo.conf example">
608 boot=/dev/sda1
609 delay=30
610 timeout=50
611 default=Gentoo
612 append="console=ttyS0,9600"
613 prompt
614
615 image=/vmlinuz
616 label=Gentoo
617 root=/dev/sda2
618 read-only
619
620 image=/vmlinuz.old
621 label=Gentoo.old
622 root=/dev/sda2
623 read-only
624 </pre>
625
626 <p>
627 The <c>boot</c> line tells elilo the location of the boot partition (in this
628 case, <path>/dev/sda1</path>). The <c>delay</c> line sets the number of
629 10<sup>th</sup> of seconds before automatically booting the default when in
630 non-interactive mode. The <c>timeout</c> line is just like the delay line but
631 for interactive mode. The <c>default</c> line sets the default kernel entry
632 (which is defined below). The <c>append</c> line adds extra options to the
633 kernel command line. The <c>prompt</c> sets the default elilo behavior to
634 interactive.
635 </p>
636
637 <p>
638 The sections that start with <c>image</c> define different bootable images.
639 Each image has a nice <c>label</c>, a <c>root</c> filesystem, and will only
640 mount the root filesystem <c>read-only</c>.
641 </p>
642
643 <p>
644 When configuration is done, just run <c>elilo --efiboot</c>. The
645 <c>--efiboot</c> option adds a menu entry for Gentoo Linux to the EFI Boot
646 Manager.
647 </p>
648
649 <pre caption="Applying the elilo configuration">
650 # <i>elilo --efiboot</i>
651 </pre>
652
653 <p>
654 Now continue with <uri link="#reboot">Rebooting the System</uri>.
655 </p>
656
657 </body>
658 </section>
659
660 <section id="reboot">
661 <title>Rebooting the System</title>
662 <subsection>
663 <body>
664
665 <p>
666 Exit the chrooted environment and unmount all mounted partitions. Then type in
667 that one magical command you have been waiting for: <c>reboot</c>.
668 </p>
669
670 <pre caption="Unmounting all partitions and rebooting" test="func:keyval('arch')='IA64'">
671 # <i>exit</i>
672 cdimage ~# <i>cd</i>
673 cdimage ~# <i>umount /mnt/gentoo/boot /mnt/gentoo/sys /mnt/gentoo/dev /mnt/gentoo/proc /mnt/gentoo</i>
674 cdimage ~# <i>reboot</i>
675 </pre>
676
677 <pre caption="Unmounting all partitions and rebooting" test="not(func:keyval('arch')='IA64')">
678 # <i>exit</i>
679 cdimage ~# <i>cd</i>
680 cdimage ~# <i>umount /mnt/gentoo/boot /mnt/gentoo/dev /mnt/gentoo/proc /mnt/gentoo</i>
681 cdimage ~# <i>reboot</i>
682 </pre>
683
684 <p>
685 Of course, don't forget to remove the bootable CD, otherwise the CD will be
686 booted again instead of your new Gentoo system.
687 </p>
688
689 <p test="func:keyval('arch')='IA64'">
690 When you reboot you should see a new Gentoo Linux menu option in the EFI Boot
691 Manager which will boot Gentoo.
692 </p>
693
694 <p>
695 Once rebooted in your Gentoo installation, finish up with <uri
696 link="?part=1&amp;chap=11">Finalizing your Gentoo Installation</uri>.
697 </p>
698
699 </body>
700 </subsection>
701 </section>
702 </sections>

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