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2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd"> 2<!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3 3
4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license --> 4<!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
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6 6
7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-x86+amd64-disk.xml,v 1.1 2006/08/02 21:15:02 neysx Exp $ --> 7<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/hb-install-x86+amd64-disk.xml,v 1.2 2006/08/02 21:15:52 neysx Exp $ -->
8 8
9<sections> 9<sections>
10 10
11<version>2.5</version> 11<version>2.6</version>
12<date>2006-01-01</date> 12<date>2006-07-26</date>
13 13
14<section> 14<section>
15<title>Introduction to Block Devices</title> 15<title>Introduction to Block Devices</title>
16<subsection> 16<subsection>
17<title>Block Devices</title> 17<title>Block Devices</title>
47<body> 47<body>
48 48
49<p> 49<p>
50Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house your Linux 50Although it is theoretically possible to use a full disk to house your Linux
51system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices 51system, this is almost never done in practice. Instead, full disk block devices
52are split up in smaller, more manageable block devices. On x86 systems, 52are split up in smaller, more manageable block devices. On <keyval id="arch"/>
53these are called <e>partitions</e>. 53systems, these are called <e>partitions</e>.
54</p> 54</p>
55 55
56<p> 56<p>
57Partitions are divided in three types: 57Partitions are divided in three types:
58<e>primary</e>, <e>extended</e> and <e>logical</e>. 58<e>primary</e>, <e>extended</e> and <e>logical</e>.
84<subsection> 84<subsection>
85<title>Advanced Storage</title> 85<title>Advanced Storage</title>
86<body> 86<body>
87 87
88<p> 88<p>
89The x86 Installation CDs provide support for EVMS and LVM2. EVMS and LVM2 89The <keyval id="arch"/> Installation CDs provide support for EVMS and LVM2.
90increase the flexibility offered by your partitioning setup. During the 90EVMS and LVM2 increase the flexibility offered by your partitioning setup.
91installation instructions, we will focus on "regular" partitions, but it is 91During the installation instructions, we will focus on "regular" partitions,
92still good to know EVMS and LVM2 are supported as well. 92but it is still good to know EVMS and LVM2 are supported as well.
93</p> 93</p>
94 94
95</body> 95</body>
96</subsection> 96</subsection>
97</section> 97</section>
183 nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored) etc. 183 nosuid (setuid bits are ignored), noexec (executable bits are ignored) etc.
184</li> 184</li>
185</ul> 185</ul>
186 186
187<p> 187<p>
188However, multiple partitions have one big disadvantage: if not configured 188However, multiple partitions have one big disadvantage: if not configured
189properly, you might result in having a system with lots 189properly, you might result in having a system with lots of free space on one
190of free space on one partition and none on another. There is also a 15-partition 190partition and none on another. There is also a 15-partition limit for SCSI and
191limit for SCSI and SATA. 191SATA.
192</p> 192</p>
193 193
194<p> 194<p>
195As an example partitioning, we show you one for a 20GB disk, used as a 195As an example partitioning, we show you one for a 20GB disk, used as a
196demonstration laptop (containing webserver, mailserver, gnome, ...): 196demonstration laptop (containing webserver, mailserver, gnome, ...):
303 303
304Command (m for help): 304Command (m for help):
305</pre> 305</pre>
306 306
307<p> 307<p>
308This particular disk is configured to house seven Linux filesystems (each with a 308This particular disk is configured to house seven Linux filesystems (each with
309corresponding partition listed as "Linux") as well as a swap partition (listed 309a corresponding partition listed as "Linux") as well as a swap partition
310as "Linux swap"). 310(listed as "Linux swap").
311</p> 311</p>
312 312
313</body> 313</body>
314</subsection> 314</subsection>
315<subsection> 315<subsection>
461/dev/hda1 * 1 14 105808+ 83 Linux 461/dev/hda1 * 1 14 105808+ 83 Linux
462/dev/hda2 15 81 506520 82 Linux swap 462/dev/hda2 15 81 506520 82 Linux swap
463/dev/hda3 82 3876 28690200 83 Linux 463/dev/hda3 82 3876 28690200 83 Linux
464</pre> 464</pre>
465 465
466
467</body> 466</body>
468</subsection> 467</subsection>
469<subsection> 468<subsection>
470<title>Saving the Partition Layout</title> 469<title>Saving the Partition Layout</title>
471<body> 470<body>
504</subsection> 503</subsection>
505<subsection> 504<subsection>
506<title>Filesystems?</title> 505<title>Filesystems?</title>
507<body> 506<body>
508 507
509<p> 508<p test="func:keyval('arch')='x86'">
510The Linux kernel supports various filesystems. We'll explain ext2, ext3, 509The Linux kernel supports various filesystems. We'll explain ext2, ext3,
511ReiserFS, XFS and JFS as these are the most commonly used filesystems on Linux 510ReiserFS, XFS and JFS as these are the most commonly used filesystems on Linux
512systems. 511systems.
512</p>
513
514<p test="func:keyval('arch')='AMD64'">
515Several filesystems are available. Some of them are found stable on the amd64
516architecture, others aren't. The following filesystems are found to be stable:
517ext2 and ext3. jfs and reiserfs may work but need more testing. If you're
518really adventurous you can try the unsupported filesystems.
513</p> 519</p>
514 520
515<p> 521<p>
516<b>ext2</b> is the tried and true Linux filesystem but doesn't have metadata 522<b>ext2</b> is the tried and true Linux filesystem but doesn't have metadata
517journaling, which means that routine ext2 filesystem checks at startup time can 523journaling, which means that routine ext2 filesystem checks at startup time can
578 <ti>ext2</ti> 584 <ti>ext2</ti>
579 <ti><c>mke2fs</c></ti> 585 <ti><c>mke2fs</c></ti>
580</tr> 586</tr>
581<tr> 587<tr>
582 <ti>ext3</ti> 588 <ti>ext3</ti>
583 <ti><c>mke2fs -j</c></ti> 589 <ti><c>mke2fs -j -O dir_index</c></ti>
584</tr> 590</tr>
585<tr> 591<tr>
586 <ti>reiserfs</ti> 592 <ti>reiserfs</ti>
587 <ti><c>mkreiserfs</c></ti> 593 <ti><c>mkreiserfs</c></ti>
588</tr> 594</tr>
602in ext3 (as in our example), you would use: 608in ext3 (as in our example), you would use:
603</p> 609</p>
604 610
605<pre caption="Applying a filesystem on a partition"> 611<pre caption="Applying a filesystem on a partition">
606# <i>mke2fs /dev/hda1</i> 612# <i>mke2fs /dev/hda1</i>
607# <i>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</i> 613# <i>mke2fs -j -O dir_index /dev/hda3</i>
608</pre> 614</pre>
609 615
610<p> 616<p>
611Now create the filesystems on your newly created partitions (or logical 617Now create the filesystems on your newly created partitions (or logical
612volumes). 618volumes).

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