/[gentoo]/xml/htdocs/doc/en/migration-to-2.6.xml
Gentoo

Diff of /xml/htdocs/doc/en/migration-to-2.6.xml

Parent Directory Parent Directory | Revision Log Revision Log | View Patch Patch

Revision 1.17 Revision 1.18
1<?xml version='1.0' encoding="UTF-8"?> 1<?xml version='1.0' encoding="UTF-8"?>
2<!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd"> 2<!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
3 3
4<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/migration-to-2.6.xml,v 1.17 2005/08/25 00:52:49 vapier Exp $ --> 4<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/migration-to-2.6.xml,v 1.18 2005/08/25 10:59:31 neysx Exp $ -->
5 5
6<guide link="/doc/en/migration-to-2.6.xml"> 6<guide link="/doc/en/migration-to-2.6.xml">
7 7
8<title>The complete Gentoo Linux 2.6 migration guide</title> 8<title>The complete Gentoo Linux 2.6 migration guide</title>
9 9
10<author title="Author"> 10<author title="Author">
11 <mail link="dsd@gentoo.org">Daniel Drake</mail> 11 <mail link="dsd@gentoo.org">Daniel Drake</mail>
12</author> 12</author>
13<author title="Contributor"> 13<author title="Contributor">
14 <mail link="sergey_zlodey@mail.ru">Sergey Galkin</mail> 14 <mail link="sergey_zlodey@mail.ru">Sergey Galkin</mail>
15</author> 15</author>
16<author title="Contributor"> 16<author title="Contributor">
17 <mail link="svyatogor@gentoo.org">Sergey Kuleshov</mail> 17 <mail link="svyatogor@gentoo.org">Sergey Kuleshov</mail>
18</author> 18</author>
19<author title="Editor"> 19<author title="Editor">
20 <mail link="neysx@gentoo.org">Xavier Neys</mail> 20 <mail link="neysx@gentoo.org">Xavier Neys</mail>
21</author> 21</author>
22<author title="Editor"> 22<author title="Editor">
23 <mail link="bennyc@gentoo.org">Benny Chuang</mail> 23 <mail link="bennyc@gentoo.org">Benny Chuang</mail>
24</author> 24</author>
25 25
26<abstract> 26<abstract>
27This document will aid you in the process of migrating from Linux 2.4 to Linux 27This document will aid you in the process of migrating from Linux 2.4 to Linux
282.6, devfs to udev, OSS to ALSA, and LVM to LVM2. 282.6, devfs to udev, OSS to ALSA, and LVM to LVM2.
37<section> 37<section>
38<title>Whats new in Linux 2.6?</title> 38<title>Whats new in Linux 2.6?</title>
39<body> 39<body>
40 40
41<p> 41<p>
42That is no easy question to answer. Linux 2.6 is the result of over 2 years 42That is no easy question to answer. Linux 2.6 is the result of over 2 years of
43of rapid development and stabilisation of new features, and is architectually 43rapid development and stabilisation of new features, and is architectually
44quite different from its 2.4 counterpart. Some of the more major changes are 44quite different from its 2.4 counterpart. Some of the more major changes are
45listed below: 45listed below:
46</p> 46</p>
47 47
48<ul> 48<ul>
145 145
146<p> 146<p>
147<e>If you do not currently use LVM for data-storage management, then LVM2 147<e>If you do not currently use LVM for data-storage management, then LVM2
148migration does not apply to you.</e> If this is the case, you can safely ignore 148migration does not apply to you.</e> If this is the case, you can safely ignore
149any parts of this document referencing LVM/LVM2. Upgrading to Linux 2.6 does 149any parts of this document referencing LVM/LVM2. Upgrading to Linux 2.6 does
150<e>not</e> require you to store your data on LVM partitions - you can keep 150<e>not</e> require you to store your data on LVM partitions - you can keep your
151your data in the standard partition-format as it always has been. 151data in the standard partition-format as it always has been.
152</p> 152</p>
153 153
154<p> 154<p>
155If you are not a LVM user, but you think LVM2 sounds useful for you, you can 155If you are not a LVM user, but you think LVM2 sounds useful for you, you can
156convert your disks to this format at a later date, by following the 156convert your disks to this format at a later date, by following the <uri
157<uri link="http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/lvm2.xml">Gentoo LVM2 Installation 157link="/doc/en/lvm2.xml">Gentoo LVM2 Installation Guide</uri>. For now, lets
158Guide</uri>. For now, lets just concentrate on getting a smooth 2.6 migration 158just concentrate on getting a smooth 2.6 migration underway.
159underway.
160</p> 159</p>
161 160
162</body> 161</body>
163</section> 162</section>
164</chapter> 163</chapter>
207</p> 206</p>
208 207
209<p> 208<p>
210Linux 2.6 introduces a new module format, and therefore requires new tools for 209Linux 2.6 introduces a new module format, and therefore requires new tools for
211handling modules. These are bundled up into the 210handling modules. These are bundled up into the
212<c>sys-apps/module-init-tools</c> package. </p> 211<c>sys-apps/module-init-tools</c> package.
212</p>
213 213
214<p> 214<p>
215You should now remove modutils and install module-init-tools: 215You should now remove modutils and install module-init-tools:
216</p> 216</p>
217 217
220# <i>emerge module-init-tools</i> 220# <i>emerge module-init-tools</i>
221</pre> 221</pre>
222 222
223<note> 223<note>
224Don't worry - even though you have just unmerged modutils, module-init-tools 224Don't worry - even though you have just unmerged modutils, module-init-tools
225provides backwards compatibility for Linux 2.4, so you will still be 225provides backwards compatibility for Linux 2.4, so you will still be able to
226able to boot into Linux 2.4 and handle modules for that kernel. 226boot into Linux 2.4 and handle modules for that kernel.
227</note> 227</note>
228 228
229<note> 229<note>
230For the above reason, module-init-tools might already be installed and working 230For the above reason, module-init-tools might already be installed and working
231with your existing Linux 2.4 kernel. In this case, you don't need to worry 231with your existing Linux 2.4 kernel. In this case, you don't need to worry
246<pre caption="Installing udev"> 246<pre caption="Installing udev">
247# <i>emerge -a udev</i> 247# <i>emerge -a udev</i>
248</pre> 248</pre>
249 249
250<p> 250<p>
251You should now read the 251You should now read the <uri link="/doc/en/udev-guide.xml">Gentoo udev
252<uri link="http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/udev-guide.xml">Gentoo udev
253Guide</uri> to get a more complete idea about the differences between udev 252Guide</uri> to get a more complete idea about the differences between udev and
254and devfs. 253devfs.
255</p> 254</p>
256 255
257</body> 256</body>
258</section> 257</section>
259<section> 258<section>
360 359
361<p> 360<p>
362When performing the above <c>emerge</c> command, if you find that it wants to 361When performing the above <c>emerge</c> command, if you find that it wants to
363install a 2.4 version of gentoo-sources (e.g. <c>gentoo-sources-2.4.26</c>), 362install a 2.4 version of gentoo-sources (e.g. <c>gentoo-sources-2.4.26</c>),
364then it means that the profile you are using is not designed for Linux 2.6 363then it means that the profile you are using is not designed for Linux 2.6
365users. Please follow the 364users. Please follow the <uri link="/doc/en/gentoo-upgrading.xml">Gentoo
366<uri link="/doc/en/gentoo-upgrading.xml">Gentoo Upgrading Document</uri> to 365Upgrading Document</uri> to switch to a 2.6-based profile, and retry installing
367switch to a 2.6-based profile, and retry installing 2.6 kernel sources. 3662.6 kernel sources.
368</p> 367</p>
369 368
370</body> 369</body>
371</section> 370</section>
372<section> 371<section>
539</p> 538</p>
540 539
541</body> 540</body>
542</section> 541</section>
543<section> 542<section>
544<title>X11 config file should now use /dev/input/mice for PS/2 and USB 543<title>X11 config file should now use /dev/input/mice for PS/2 and USB mice</title>
545mice</title>
546<body> 544<body>
547 545
548<p> 546<p>
549One of the changes that a default udev configuration introduces is different 547One of the changes that a default udev configuration introduces is different
550organisation of the mouse device nodes. Previously, you would have had nodes 548organisation of the mouse device nodes. Previously, you would have had nodes
560below when you attempt to start X11: 558below when you attempt to start X11:
561</p> 559</p>
562 560
563<pre caption="Common error when starting X on a udev system for the first time"> 561<pre caption="Common error when starting X on a udev system for the first time">
564(EE) xf86OpenSerial: Cannot open device /dev/mouse 562(EE) xf86OpenSerial: Cannot open device /dev/mouse
565 No such file or directory. 563 No such file or directory.
566(EE) Mouse0: cannot open input device 564(EE) Mouse0: cannot open input device
567(EE) PreInit failed for input device "Mouse0" 565(EE) PreInit failed for input device "Mouse0"
568No core pointer 566No core pointer
569</pre> 567</pre>
570 568
583<path>/etc/X11/XF86Config</path> 581<path>/etc/X11/XF86Config</path>
584</note> 582</note>
585 583
586<pre caption="Sample mouse InputDevice section"> 584<pre caption="Sample mouse InputDevice section">
587Section "InputDevice" 585Section "InputDevice"
588 Identifier "Mouse0" 586 Identifier "Mouse0"
589 Driver "mouse" 587 Driver "mouse"
590 Option "Protocol" "auto" 588 Option "Protocol" "auto"
591 Option "Device" "/dev/input/mice" 589 Option "Device" "/dev/input/mice"
592EndSection 590EndSection
593</pre> 591</pre>
594 592
595<note> 593<note>
596If you are using a serial mouse, the new device path will be 594If you are using a serial mouse, the new device path will be
607If you used the original Serial ATA drivers under Linux 2.4, you probably 605If you used the original Serial ATA drivers under Linux 2.4, you probably
608observed your SATA devices having names such as <c>/dev/hde</c>. 606observed your SATA devices having names such as <c>/dev/hde</c>.
609</p> 607</p>
610 608
611<p> 609<p>
612Linux 2.6 introduces some new SATA drivers (libata) which are based on the 610Linux 2.6 introduces some new SATA drivers (libata) which are based on the SCSI
613SCSI subsystem. As these drivers are based on SCSI, your SATA disks will now 611subsystem. As these drivers are based on SCSI, your SATA disks will now show up
614show up as SCSI devices. Your first SATA disk will be named <c>/dev/sda</c>. 612as SCSI devices. Your first SATA disk will be named <c>/dev/sda</c>. You will
615You will need to update your <c>/etc/fstab</c> file to reflect this, and you 613need to update your <c>/etc/fstab</c> file to reflect this, and you will need
616will need to bear this in mind when choosing the root/real_root kernel boot 614to bear this in mind when choosing the root/real_root kernel boot parameter
617parameter later on. 615later on.
618</p> 616</p>
619 617
620<note> 618<note>
621libata has been backported into recent versions of Linux 2.4, so you may 619libata has been backported into recent versions of Linux 2.4, so you may
622already be familiar with the new device naming. 620already be familiar with the new device naming.
636 634
637<p> 635<p>
638The developer of bootsplash appears to have lost interest in his project, given 636The developer of bootsplash appears to have lost interest in his project, given
639some design problems. However, Gentoo developer <e>Michal Januszewski</e> is 637some design problems. However, Gentoo developer <e>Michal Januszewski</e> is
640developing a successor, <c>gensplash</c>, which in included in the 638developing a successor, <c>gensplash</c>, which in included in the
641gentoo-sources-2.6 kernel. You can follow Michal's 639gentoo-sources-2.6 kernel. You can follow Michal's <uri
642<uri link="http://dev.gentoo.org/~spock/projects/gensplash/archive/gensplash-in-5-easy-steps.txt"> 640link="http://dev.gentoo.org/~spock/projects/gensplash/archive/gensplash-in-5-easy-steps.txt">
643Gensplash in 5 easy steps</uri> document in order to familiarize yourself with 641Gensplash in 5 easy steps</uri> document in order to familiarize yourself with
644how gensplash is operated. 642how gensplash is operated.
645</p> 643</p>
646 644
647</body> 645</body>
726<pre caption="Required kernel options"> 724<pre caption="Required kernel options">
727File systems ---&gt; 725File systems ---&gt;
728 Pseudo Filesystems ---&gt; 726 Pseudo Filesystems ---&gt;
729 [*] /proc file system support 727 [*] /proc file system support
730 [*] Virtual memory file system support (former shm fs) 728 [*] Virtual memory file system support (former shm fs)
731 729
732<comment>(the following are required for udev):</comment> 730<comment>(the following are required for udev):</comment>
733General setup ---&gt; 731General setup ---&gt;
734 [*] Support for hot-pluggable devices 732 [*] Support for hot-pluggable devices
735 733
736<comment>(the following are required for ALSA):</comment> 734<comment>(the following are required for ALSA):</comment>
762hardware present in your system. Be sure to enable support for the IDE 760hardware present in your system. Be sure to enable support for the IDE
763controller on your motherboard if you wish to benefit from fast DMA disk 761controller on your motherboard if you wish to benefit from fast DMA disk
764access. Refer to the <uri 762access. Refer to the <uri
765link="/doc/en/handbook/handbook-x86.xml?part=1&amp;chap=7">Configuring the 763link="/doc/en/handbook/handbook-x86.xml?part=1&amp;chap=7">Configuring the
766Kernel</uri> section of the <uri link="/doc/en/handbook/index.xml">Gentoo 764Kernel</uri> section of the <uri link="/doc/en/handbook/index.xml">Gentoo
767Handbook</uri> for additional guidance here. 765Handbook</uri> for additional guidance here.
768</p> 766</p>
769 767
770</body> 768</body>
771</section> 769</section>
772<section> 770<section>
850</pre> 848</pre>
851 849
852<p> 850<p>
853In the above example, we also take advantage of genkernel features to open 851In the above example, we also take advantage of genkernel features to open
854menuconfig to allow you to customise the kernel configuration (if you wish), 852menuconfig to allow you to customise the kernel configuration (if you wish),
855and to update the grub bootloader configuration after compilation. 853and to update the grub bootloader configuration after compilation.
856</p> 854</p>
857 855
858<p> 856<p>
859You should choose genkernel arguments that suit you, but do not forget to 857You should choose genkernel arguments that suit you, but do not forget to
860include the <c>--udev</c> argument! Refer to the <uri 858include the <c>--udev</c> argument! Refer to the <uri
863Kernel</uri> chapter of the <uri link="/doc/en/handbook/index.xml">Gentoo 861Kernel</uri> chapter of the <uri link="/doc/en/handbook/index.xml">Gentoo
864Handbook</uri> for additional information. 862Handbook</uri> for additional information.
865</p> 863</p>
866 864
867<p> 865<p>
868If you choose to update your bootloader config yourself, then you must 866If you choose to update your bootloader config yourself, then you must remember
869remember to include the <c>udev</c> kernel parameter. A sample <e>grub</e> 867to include the <c>udev</c> kernel parameter. A sample <e>grub</e> config
870config section is shown below, but remember to adjust the <e>real_root</e> 868section is shown below, but remember to adjust the <e>real_root</e> parameter
871parameter for your system. 869for your system.
872</p> 870</p>
873 871
874<pre caption="Sample GRUB config for genkernel + udev"> 872<pre caption="Sample GRUB config for genkernel + udev">
875title=Gentoo Linux (2.6 kernel) 873title=Gentoo Linux (2.6 kernel)
876root (hd0,0) 874root (hd0,0)
933# /etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6: kernel modules to load when system boots. 931# /etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6: kernel modules to load when system boots.
934# 932#
935# Note that this file is for 2.6 kernels. 933# Note that this file is for 2.6 kernels.
936# 934#
937# Add the names of modules that you'd like to load when the system 935# Add the names of modules that you'd like to load when the system
938# starts into this file, one per line. Comments begin with # and 936# starts into this file, one per line. Comments begin with # and
939# are ignored. Read man modules.autoload for additional details. 937# are ignored. Read man modules.autoload for additional details.
940 938
9413c59x 9393c59x
942nvidia 940nvidia
943</pre> 941</pre>
944 942
951<section> 949<section>
952<title>Upgrading to LVM2 tools</title> 950<title>Upgrading to LVM2 tools</title>
953<body> 951<body>
954 952
955<note> 953<note>
956If you do not use LVM to manage your disk storage, you can safely skip 954If you do not use LVM to manage your disk storage, you can safely skip this
957this chapter and skip onto the next. 955chapter and skip onto the next.
958</note> 956</note>
959 957
960<p> 958<p>
961Fortunately, upgrading from the LVM1 user tools to the LVM2 versions is very 959Fortunately, upgrading from the LVM1 user tools to the LVM2 versions is very
962simple: 960simple:
967# <i>emerge lvm2</i> 965# <i>emerge lvm2</i>
968</pre> 966</pre>
969 967
970<note> 968<note>
971The LVM2 tools are fully backwards-compatible with LVM1. Your disk data will 969The LVM2 tools are fully backwards-compatible with LVM1. Your disk data will
972not be touched. You are not breaking any backwards-compatibility by doing 970not be touched. You are not breaking any backwards-compatibility by doing this,
973this, you will continue to be able to boot 2.4 as usual. 971you will continue to be able to boot 2.4 as usual.
974</note> 972</note>
975 973
976</body> 974</body>
977</section> 975</section>
978</chapter> 976</chapter>
997Choose Linux 2.6. 995Choose Linux 2.6.
998</p> 996</p>
999 997
1000<p> 998<p>
1001Once the system has booted, check that things are working. If you made a 999Once the system has booted, check that things are working. If you made a
1002mistake in the kernel configuration, don't worry, you can skip back to the 1000mistake in the kernel configuration, don't worry, you can skip back to the <uri
1003<uri link="#conf">Configuring, building, and installing the kernel</uri> 1001link="#conf">Configuring, building, and installing the kernel</uri> section,
1004section, make your change, recompile and install new kernel image, reboot, and 1002make your change, recompile and install new kernel image, reboot, and try
1005try again! 1003again!
1006</p> 1004</p>
1007 1005
1008</body> 1006</body>
1009</section> 1007</section>
1010<section> 1008<section>
1019<pre caption="Invoking the automatic ALSA configuration utility"> 1017<pre caption="Invoking the automatic ALSA configuration utility">
1020# <i>alsaconf</i> 1018# <i>alsaconf</i>
1021</pre> 1019</pre>
1022 1020
1023<p> 1021<p>
1024The process is straightforward: allow the <e>/etc/modules.d/alsa</e> file to 1022The process is straightforward: allow the <e>/etc/modules.d/alsa</e> file to be
1025be automatically updated, and then allow ALSA to be reloaded. alsaconf will 1023automatically updated, and then allow ALSA to be reloaded. alsaconf will then
1026then terminate, however you will need to run it multiple times if you have 1024terminate, however you will need to run it multiple times if you have multiple
1027multiple sound devices installed in your system. 1025sound devices installed in your system.
1028</p>
1029
1030<p> 1026</p>
1027
1028<p>
1031You should now add <c>alsasound</c> to your boot runlevel, so that volumes 1029You should now add <c>alsasound</c> to your boot runlevel, so that volumes will
1032will be saved on shutdown and restored on bootup: 1030be saved on shutdown and restored on bootup:
1033</p> 1031</p>
1034 1032
1035<pre caption="Adding alsasound to the boot runlevel"> 1033<pre caption="Adding alsasound to the boot runlevel">
1036# <i>rc-update add alsasound boot</i> 1034# <i>rc-update add alsasound boot</i>
1037</pre> 1035</pre>
1047<section> 1045<section>
1048<title>Any immediate problems?</title> 1046<title>Any immediate problems?</title>
1049<body> 1047<body>
1050 1048
1051<p> 1049<p>
1052At this stage you should refer back to the <uri link="#pitfalls">Known 1050At this stage you should refer back to the <uri link="#pitfalls">Known pitfalls
1053pitfalls with Linux 2.6 migration</uri> section which may be helpful with any 1051with Linux 2.6 migration</uri> section which may be helpful with any issues you
1054issues you encounter immediately. 1052encounter immediately.
1055</p> 1053</p>
1056 1054
1057</body> 1055</body>
1058</section> 1056</section>
1059</chapter> 1057</chapter>
1062<title>Header files and NPTL</title> 1060<title>Header files and NPTL</title>
1063<section> 1061<section>
1064<body> 1062<body>
1065 1063
1066<p> 1064<p>
1067By now you are running Linux 2.6 and hopefully have all issues ironed out. You 1065By now you are running Linux 2.6 and hopefully have all issues ironed out. You
1068should now update your Linux kernel header files and re-merge glibc so that 1066should now update your Linux kernel header files and re-merge glibc so that
1069userspace applications can take advantage of new Linux 2.6 features. 1067userspace applications can take advantage of new Linux 2.6 features.
1070</p> 1068</p>
1071 1069
1072<pre caption="Updating to linux-headers"> 1070<pre caption="Updating to linux-headers">
1144Hopefully you have just completed a smooth migration and you are enjoying the 1142Hopefully you have just completed a smooth migration and you are enjoying the
1145benefits which Linux 2.6 brings over 2.4. 1143benefits which Linux 2.6 brings over 2.4.
1146</p> 1144</p>
1147 1145
1148<p> 1146<p>
1149I would like to say a word of thanks to the many users who effectively 1147I would like to say a word of thanks to the many users who effectively 'tested'
1150'tested' this document while it was in its early stages, and provided feedback 1148this document while it was in its early stages, and provided feedback about how
1151about how the migration process went. Sorry that I did not reply to all the 1149the migration process went. Sorry that I did not reply to all the emails (there
1152emails (there were a lot!), but I did read every one, and refined this 1150were a lot!), but I did read every one, and refined this document where
1153document where appropriate. Enjoy your 2.6-enhanced systems :) 1151appropriate. Enjoy your 2.6-enhanced systems :)
1154</p> 1152</p>
1155 1153
1156</body> 1154</body>
1157</section> 1155</section>
1158<section> 1156<section>
1186<pre caption="Removing remaining temporary files"> 1184<pre caption="Removing remaining temporary files">
1187# <i>rm -rf /usr/src/linux-2.4.*</i> 1185# <i>rm -rf /usr/src/linux-2.4.*</i>
1188</pre> 1186</pre>
1189 1187
1190<p> 1188<p>
1191You can additionally remove modules and information files relating to your 1189You can additionally remove modules and information files relating to your old
1192old 2.4 kernel installations, as these are no longer needed. 11902.4 kernel installations, as these are no longer needed.
1193</p> 1191</p>
1194 1192
1195<pre caption="Removing previously-installed 2.4 modules"> 1193<pre caption="Removing previously-installed 2.4 modules">
1196# <i>rm -rf /lib/modules/2.4.*</i> 1194# <i>rm -rf /lib/modules/2.4.*</i>
1197</pre> 1195</pre>
1198 1196
1199<p> 1197<p>
1200The 2.4 kernel binaries you used to boot from can also be safely removed. 1198The 2.4 kernel binaries you used to boot from can also be safely removed. You
1201You should mount your <c>/boot</c> partition, and remove those images. You 1199should mount your <c>/boot</c> partition, and remove those images. You should
1202should also update your bootloader configuration so that it no longer 1200also update your bootloader configuration so that it no longer references these
1203references these deleted kernel images. 1201deleted kernel images.
1204</p> 1202</p>
1205 1203
1206<p> 1204<p>
1207Some Linux 2.4 users will have previously installed the <c>alsa-driver</c> 1205Some Linux 2.4 users will have previously installed the <c>alsa-driver</c>
1208package to benefit from the new audio capabilities included in Linux 2.6. If 1206package to benefit from the new audio capabilities included in Linux 2.6. If
1228# <i>emerge --unmerge alsa-driver i2c devfsd</i> 1226# <i>emerge --unmerge alsa-driver i2c devfsd</i>
1229</pre> 1227</pre>
1230 1228
1231<p> 1229<p>
1232If you are LVM2 user, you may wish to convert your data into the LVM2 data 1230If you are LVM2 user, you may wish to convert your data into the LVM2 data
1233format in order to benefit from the advantages which LVM2 provides. 1231format in order to benefit from the advantages which LVM2 provides. However,
1234However, this operation will prevent you from ever accessing your LVM data 1232this operation will prevent you from ever accessing your LVM data from a 2.4
1235from a 2.4 kernel. If you want to continue with the conversion (this is totally 1233kernel. If you want to continue with the conversion (this is totally
1236optional!), then you should examine the <c>vgconvert</c> man page for 1234optional!), then you should examine the <c>vgconvert</c> man page for
1237instructions on how to carry this out. An example is shown below, where 1235instructions on how to carry this out. An example is shown below, where
1238<c>main</c> is the volume group name. 1236<c>main</c> is the volume group name.
1239</p> 1237</p>
1240 1238

Legend:
Removed from v.1.17  
changed lines
  Added in v.1.18

  ViewVC Help
Powered by ViewVC 1.1.20