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1<?xml version = '1.0' encoding = 'UTF-8'?> 1<?xml version = '1.0' encoding = 'UTF-8'?>
2<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/virt-mail-howto.xml,v 1.25 2004/02/12 19:28:37 vapier Exp $ --> 2<!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/virt-mail-howto.xml,v 1.26 2004/02/19 16:51:53 swift Exp $ -->
3<!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd"> 3<!DOCTYPE guide SYSTEM "/dtd/guide.dtd">
4 4
5<guide link=" /doc/en/virt-mail-howto.xml" > 5<guide link=" /doc/en/virt-mail-howto.xml" >
6<title>Virtual Mailhosting System with Postfix Guide</title> 6<title>Virtual Mailhosting System with Postfix Guide</title>
7<author title="Author" > 7<author title="Author" >
8<mail link="antifa@gentoo.org" >Ken Nowack</mail> 8<mail link="antifa@gentoo.org" >Ken Nowack</mail>
9</author> 9</author>
10<author title="Author" > 10<author title="Author" >
11<mail link="ezra@revoltltd.org" >Ezra Gorman</mail> 11<mail link="ezra@revoltltd.org" >Ezra Gorman</mail>
12</author> 12</author>
13<author title="Editor"> 13<author title="Editor">
14<mail link="klasikahl@gentoo.org" >Zack Gilburd</mail> 14<mail link="klasikahl@gentoo.org" >Zack Gilburd</mail>
15</author> 15</author>
16<abstract>This document details how to create a virtual mailhosting system based upon postfix, mysql, courier-imap, and cyrus-sasl. </abstract> 16<abstract>This document details how to create a virtual mailhosting system based upon postfix, mysql, courier-imap, and cyrus-sasl. </abstract>
17<version>1.0.9</version> 17<version>1.0.9</version>
26IV. Cyrus-sasl 26IV. Cyrus-sasl
27V. SSL Certificates for Postfix and Apache 27V. SSL Certificates for Postfix and Apache
28VI. Adding SSL and SASL support to Postfix 28VI. Adding SSL and SASL support to Postfix
29VII. MySQL 29VII. MySQL
30VIII. Apache and phpMyAdmin 30VIII. Apache and phpMyAdmin
31IX. The vmail user 31IX. The vmail user
32X. Configuring MySQL Authentication and vhosts 32X. Configuring MySQL Authentication and vhosts
33XI. Squirrelmail 33XI. Squirrelmail
34XII. Mailman 34XII. Mailman
35XIII. Content Filtering and Anti-Virus 35XIII. Content Filtering and Anti-Virus
36XIV. Wrap Up 36XIV. Wrap Up
37XV. Troubleshooting 37XV. Troubleshooting
38 38
39--><chapter> 39--><chapter>
40<title>Introduction</title> 40<title>Introduction</title>
41<section>
41<body> 42<body>
42<p>For most gentoo users, a simple mail client and fetchmail will do. However, if you're hosting a domain with your system, you'll need a full blown MTA (Mail Transfer Agent). And if you're hosting multiple domains, then you'll definitely need something more robust to handle all of the email for your users. This system was designed to be an elegant solution to that problem.</p> 43<p>For most gentoo users, a simple mail client and fetchmail will do. However, if you're hosting a domain with your system, you'll need a full blown MTA (Mail Transfer Agent). And if you're hosting multiple domains, then you'll definitely need something more robust to handle all of the email for your users. This system was designed to be an elegant solution to that problem.</p>
43<p>A virtual mail system needs to be able to handle email for numerous domains with multiple users over a variety of interfaces. This presents some issues that must be dealt with. For instance, what if you have two users on different domains that want the same user name? If you are providing imap access and smtp-auth, how do combine the various authentication daemons into a single system? How do you provide security for the numerous components that comprise the system? How do you manage it all?</p> 44<p>A virtual mail system needs to be able to handle email for numerous domains with multiple users over a variety of interfaces. This presents some issues that must be dealt with. For instance, what if you have two users on different domains that want the same user name? If you are providing imap access and smtp-auth, how do combine the various authentication daemons into a single system? How do you provide security for the numerous components that comprise the system? How do you manage it all?</p>
44<p>This howto will show you how to set up with a mail system capable of handling mail for as many domains as your hardware can handle, supports virtual mail users that don't require shell accounts, has domain specific user names, can authenticate web, imap, smtp, and pop3 clients against a single database, utilizes ssl for transport layer security, has a web interface, can handle mailing lists for any domain on the machine, and is controlled by a nice, central and easy mysql database. </p> 45<p>This howto will show you how to set up with a mail system capable of handling mail for as many domains as your hardware can handle, supports virtual mail users that don't require shell accounts, has domain specific user names, can authenticate web, imap, smtp, and pop3 clients against a single database, utilizes ssl for transport layer security, has a web interface, can handle mailing lists for any domain on the machine, and is controlled by a nice, central and easy mysql database. </p>
45<p>There are quite a variety of ways to go about setting up a virtual mailhosting system. With so may options, another may be the best choice for your specific needs. Consider investigating <uri>http://www.qmail.org/</uri> and <uri>http://www.exim.org/</uri> to explore your options. </p> 46<p>There are quite a variety of ways to go about setting up a virtual mailhosting system. With so may options, another may be the best choice for your specific needs. Consider investigating <uri>http://www.qmail.org/</uri> and <uri>http://www.exim.org/</uri> to explore your options. </p>
46<p>The following packages are used in this setup: 47<p>The following packages are used in this setup:
47 48
48 apache, courier-imap, pam_mysql, postfix, mod_php, phpmyadmin, squirrelmail, cyrus-sasl, mysql, php, and mailman.</p> 49 apache, courier-imap, pam_mysql, postfix, mod_php, phpmyadmin, squirrelmail, cyrus-sasl, mysql, php, and mailman.</p>
49<p>Make sure to turn on the following USE variables in <path>/etc/make.conf</path> before compiling the packages: <c>USE=&quot;mysql imap libwww maildir sasl ssl&quot;</c>. Otherwise you will most likely have to recompile things to get the support you need for all the protocols. Further, it's a good idea to turn off any other mail and network variables, like ipv6.</p> 50<p>Make sure to turn on the following USE variables in <path>/etc/make.conf</path> before compiling the packages: <c>USE=&quot;mysql imap libwww maildir sasl ssl&quot;</c>. Otherwise you will most likely have to recompile things to get the support you need for all the protocols. Further, it's a good idea to turn off any other mail and network variables, like ipv6.</p>
50<impo>This howto was written for postfix-2.0.x. If you are using postfix &lt; 2 some of the variables in this document will be different. It is recommended that you upgrade. Some other packages included in this howto are version sensitive as well. You are advised to read the documentation included with packages if you run into issues with this.</impo> 51<impo>This howto was written for postfix-2.0.x. If you are using postfix &lt; 2 some of the variables in this document will be different. It is recommended that you upgrade. Some other packages included in this howto are version sensitive as well. You are advised to read the documentation included with packages if you run into issues with this.</impo>
51<impo>This document uses apache-1.3.x. Apache-2 has been marked stable in portage. However there are still a number of issues with php integration. Until php support in apache-2.0.x is marked stable, this guide will continue to use the 1.3.x version.</impo> 52<impo>This document uses apache-1.3.x. Apache-2 has been marked stable in portage. However there are still a number of issues with php integration. Until php support in apache-2.0.x is marked stable, this guide will continue to use the 1.3.x version.</impo>
52<impo>You need a domain name to run a public mail server, or at least an MX record for a domain. Ideally you would have control of at least two domains to take advantage of your new virtual domain functionality.</impo> 53<impo>You need a domain name to run a public mail server, or at least an MX record for a domain. Ideally you would have control of at least two domains to take advantage of your new virtual domain functionality.</impo>
53<impo>Make sure <path>/etc/hostname</path> is set to the right hostname for your mail server. Verify your hostname is set correctly with <c>hostname</c>. Also verify that there are no conflicting entries in <path>/etc/hosts</path>.</impo> 54<impo>Make sure <path>/etc/hostname</path> is set to the right hostname for your mail server. Verify your hostname is set correctly with <c>hostname</c>. Also verify that there are no conflicting entries in <path>/etc/hosts</path>.</impo>
54<note>It is recommended that you read this entire document and familiarize yourself with all the steps before attempting the install. If you run into problems with any of the steps, check the troubleshooting guide at the end of this document. Also, not all the referenced packages are necessary, this set up is very flexible. For instance, if you do not desire a web interface, feel free to skip the squirrelmail section.</note> 55<note>It is recommended that you read this entire document and familiarize yourself with all the steps before attempting the install. If you run into problems with any of the steps, check the troubleshooting guide at the end of this document. Also, not all the referenced packages are necessary, this set up is very flexible. For instance, if you do not desire a web interface, feel free to skip the squirrelmail section.</note>
55</body> 56</body>
57</section>
56</chapter> 58</chapter>
59
57<chapter> 60<chapter>
58<title>Postfix Basics</title> 61<title>Postfix Basics</title>
62<section>
59<body> 63<body>
60<pre caption="Install postfix" ># <i>emerge postfix</i> 64<pre caption="Install postfix" ># <i>emerge postfix</i>
61</pre> 65</pre>
62<warn>Verify that you have not installed any other MTA, such as ssmtp, exim, or qmail, or you will surely have BIG problems.</warn> 66<warn>Verify that you have not installed any other MTA, such as ssmtp, exim, or qmail, or you will surely have BIG problems.</warn>
63<p>After postfix is installed, it's time to configure it. Change the following options in <path>/etc/postfix/main.cf</path>:</p> 67<p>After postfix is installed, it's time to configure it. Change the following options in <path>/etc/postfix/main.cf</path>:</p>
64<pre caption="/etc/postfix/main.cf" > 68<pre caption="/etc/postfix/main.cf" >
65myhostname = $host.domain.name 69myhostname = $host.domain.name
66mydomain = $domain.name 70mydomain = $domain.name
67inet_interfaces = all 71inet_interfaces = all
68mydestination = $myhostname, localhost.$mydomain $mydomain 72mydestination = $myhostname, localhost.$mydomain $mydomain
69mynetworks = my.ip.net.work/24, 127.0.0.0/8 73mynetworks = my.ip.net.work/24, 127.0.0.0/8
70home_mailbox = .maildir/ 74home_mailbox = .maildir/
71local_destination_concurrency_limit = 2 75local_destination_concurrency_limit = 2
72default_destination_concurrency_limit = 10 </pre> 76default_destination_concurrency_limit = 10 </pre>
73<p>Next change the following in <path>/etc/postfix/master.cf</path>. This will turn on verbose output for debugging:</p> 77<p>Next change the following in <path>/etc/postfix/master.cf</path>. This will turn on verbose output for debugging:</p>
79smtp inet n - n - - smtpd -v 83smtp inet n - n - - smtpd -v
80 84
81<codenote>Just add the <c>-v</c> after the smtpd in the above line</codenote> 85<codenote>Just add the <c>-v</c> after the smtpd in the above line</codenote>
82</pre> 86</pre>
83<p>Next, edit <path>/etc/mail/aliases</path> to add your local aliases. There should at least be an alias for root like: <c>root: your@email.address</c>.</p> 87<p>Next, edit <path>/etc/mail/aliases</path> to add your local aliases. There should at least be an alias for root like: <c>root: your@email.address</c>.</p>
84<pre caption="Starting postfix for the first time" > 88<pre caption="Starting postfix for the first time" >
85# <i>/usr/bin/newaliases</i> 89# <i>/usr/bin/newaliases</i>
86<codenote>This will install the new aliases. You only need to do this </codenote> 90<codenote>This will install the new aliases. You only need to do this </codenote>
87<codenote>when you update or install aliases.</codenote> 91<codenote>when you update or install aliases.</codenote>
88 92
89# <i>/etc/init.d/postfix start</i> 93# <i>/etc/init.d/postfix start</i>
90</pre> 94</pre>
91<p>Now that postfix is running, fire up your favorite console mail client and send yourself an email. I use <c>mutt</c> for all my console mail. Verify that postfix is delivering mail to local users, once that's done, we're on to the next step.</p> 95<p>Now that postfix is running, fire up your favorite console mail client and send yourself an email. I use <c>mutt</c> for all my console mail. Verify that postfix is delivering mail to local users, once that's done, we're on to the next step.</p>
92<note>I strongly recommend that you verify this basic postfix setup is functioning before you progress to the next step of the howto. </note> 96<note>I strongly recommend that you verify this basic postfix setup is functioning before you progress to the next step of the howto. </note>
93</body> 97</body>
98</section>
94</chapter> 99</chapter>
95<chapter> 100<chapter>
96<title>Courier-imap</title> 101<title>Courier-imap</title>
102<section>
97<body> 103<body>
98<pre caption="Install courier-imap" ># <i>emerge courier-imap</i> 104<pre caption="Install courier-imap" ># <i>emerge courier-imap</i>
99</pre> 105</pre>
100<pre caption="Courier-imap configuration" > 106<pre caption="Courier-imap configuration" >
101# <i>cd /etc/courier-imap</i> 107# <i>cd /etc/courier-imap</i>
102<codenote>If you want to use the ssl capabilities of courier-imap or pop3, </codenote> 108<codenote>If you want to use the ssl capabilities of courier-imap or pop3, </codenote>
103<codenote>you'll need to create certs for this purpose.</codenote> 109<codenote>you'll need to create certs for this purpose.</codenote>
104<codenote>This step is recommended. If you do not want to use ssl, skip this step.</codenote> 110<codenote>This step is recommended. If you do not want to use ssl, skip this step.</codenote>
105 111
106# <i>nano -w pop3d.cnf</i> 112# <i>nano -w pop3d.cnf</i>
107# <i>nano -w imapd.cnf</i> 113# <i>nano -w imapd.cnf</i>
108<codenote>Change the C, ST, L, CN, and email parameters to match your server.</codenote> 114<codenote>Change the C, ST, L, CN, and email parameters to match your server.</codenote>
109 115
110# <i>mkpop3dcert</i> 116# <i>mkpop3dcert</i>
111# <i>mkimapdcert</i> 117# <i>mkimapdcert</i>
112</pre> 118</pre>
113<pre caption="Start the courier services you need." > 119<pre caption="Start the courier services you need." >
114# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-imapd start</i> 120# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-imapd start</i>
115# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-imapd-ssl start</i> 121# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-imapd-ssl start</i>
116# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-pop3d start</i> 122# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-pop3d start</i>
117# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-pop3d-ssl start</i> 123# <i>/etc/init.d/courier-pop3d-ssl start</i>
118</pre> 124</pre>
119<p>Start up your favorite mail client and verify that all connections you've started work for receiving and sending mail. Now that the basics work, we're going to do a whole bunch of stuff at once to get the rest of the system running. Again, please verify that what we've installed already works before progressing.</p> 125<p>Start up your favorite mail client and verify that all connections you've started work for receiving and sending mail. Now that the basics work, we're going to do a whole bunch of stuff at once to get the rest of the system running. Again, please verify that what we've installed already works before progressing.</p>
120</body> 126</body>
127</section>
121</chapter> 128</chapter>
122<chapter> 129<chapter>
123<title>Cyrus-sasl</title> 130<title>Cyrus-sasl</title>
131<section>
124<body> 132<body>
125<p>Next we're going to install cyrus-sasl. Sasl is going to play the role of actually passing your auth variables to pam, which will in turn pass that information to mysql for authentication of smtp users. For this howto, we'll not even try to verify that sasl is working until mysql is set up and contains a test user. Which is fine since we'll be authenticating against mysql in the end anyway.</p> 133<p>Next we're going to install cyrus-sasl. Sasl is going to play the role of actually passing your auth variables to pam, which will in turn pass that information to mysql for authentication of smtp users. For this howto, we'll not even try to verify that sasl is working until mysql is set up and contains a test user. Which is fine since we'll be authenticating against mysql in the end anyway.</p>
126<note>Now for some reason, sasl will not play nicely with pam against the shadow file. I banged my head against this problem for, well, a long time. If anyone knows why sasl will not auth against the shadow file in its current gentoo incarnation, please <mail link="ken@kickasskungfu.com" >email me</mail> as I'd love to hear a solution to this.</note> 134<note>Now for some reason, sasl will not play nicely with pam against the shadow file. I banged my head against this problem for, well, a long time. If anyone knows why sasl will not auth against the shadow file in its current gentoo incarnation, please <mail link="ken@kickasskungfu.com" >email me</mail> as I'd love to hear a solution to this.</note>
127<pre caption="Configuring and installing the cyrus-sasl ebuild" > 135<pre caption="Configuring and installing the cyrus-sasl ebuild" >
128# <i>USE='-ldap -mysql' emerge cyrus-sasl</i> 136# <i>USE='-ldap -mysql' emerge cyrus-sasl</i>
129<codenote>We don't have ldap and we're not using sasl's mysql capabilities </codenote> 137<codenote>We don't have ldap and we're not using sasl's mysql capabilities </codenote>
130<codenote>so we need to turn them off for this build.</codenote> 138<codenote>so we need to turn them off for this build.</codenote>
131</pre> 139</pre>
132<p>Next, edit <path>/usr/lib/sasl2/smtpd.conf</path>.</p> 140<p>Next, edit <path>/usr/lib/sasl2/smtpd.conf</path>.</p>
133<pre caption="Starting sasl" > 141<pre caption="Starting sasl" >
134# <i>nano -w /usr/lib/sasl2/smtpd.conf</i> 142# <i>nano -w /usr/lib/sasl2/smtpd.conf</i>
135pwcheck_method: saslauthd 143pwcheck_method: saslauthd
136mech_list: LOGIN PLAIN 144mech_list: LOGIN PLAIN
137<codenote>It's important to turn off auth mehtods we are not using.</codenote> 145<codenote>It's important to turn off auth mehtods we are not using.</codenote>
138<codenote>They cause problems for some mail clients.</codenote> 146<codenote>They cause problems for some mail clients.</codenote>
139# <i>/etc/init.d/saslauthd start</i> 147# <i>/etc/init.d/saslauthd start</i>
140</pre> 148</pre>
141</body> 149</body>
150</section>
142</chapter> 151</chapter>
143<chapter> 152<chapter>
144<title>SSL Certs for Postfix and Apache</title> 153<title>SSL Certs for Postfix and Apache</title>
154<section>
145<body> 155<body>
146<p>Next we're going to make a set of ssl certificates for postfix and apache.</p> 156<p>Next we're going to make a set of ssl certificates for postfix and apache.</p>
147<pre> 157<pre>
148# <i>cd /etc/ssl/</i> 158# <i>cd /etc/ssl/</i>
149# <i>nano -w openssl.cnf</i> 159# <i>nano -w openssl.cnf</i>
150 160
151<codenote>Change the following default values for your domain:</codenote> 161<codenote>Change the following default values for your domain:</codenote>
152countryName_default 162countryName_default
153stateOrProvinceName_default 163stateOrProvinceName_default
154localityName_default 164localityName_default
1550.organizationName_default 1650.organizationName_default
156commonName_default 166commonName_default
157emailAddress_default. 167emailAddress_default.
158 168
159<codenote>If the variables are not already present, just add them in a sensible place.</codenote> 169<codenote>If the variables are not already present, just add them in a sensible place.</codenote>
175# <i>./CA.pl -newca</i> 185# <i>./CA.pl -newca</i>
176# <i>./CA.pl -newreq</i> 186# <i>./CA.pl -newreq</i>
177# <i>./CA.pl -sign</i> 187# <i>./CA.pl -sign</i>
178# <i>cp newcert.pem /etc/postfix</i> 188# <i>cp newcert.pem /etc/postfix</i>
179# <i>cp newreq.pem /etc/postfix</i> 189# <i>cp newreq.pem /etc/postfix</i>
180# <i>cp demoCA/cacert.pem /etc/postfix</i> 190# <i>cp demoCA/cacert.pem /etc/postfix</i>
181<codenote>Now we do the same thing for apache</codenote> 191<codenote>Now we do the same thing for apache</codenote>
182 192
183# <i>openssl req -new > new.cert.csr</i> 193# <i>openssl req -new > new.cert.csr</i>
184# <i>openssl rsa -in privkey.pem -out new.cert.key</i> 194# <i>openssl rsa -in privkey.pem -out new.cert.key</i>
185# <i>openssl x509 -in new.cert.csr -out new.cert.cert -req -signkey new.cert.key -days 365</i> 195# <i>openssl x509 -in new.cert.csr -out new.cert.cert -req -signkey new.cert.key -days 365</i>
186<codenote>Just leave the resulting certificates here for now.</codenote> 196<codenote>Just leave the resulting certificates here for now.</codenote>
187<codenote>We'll install them after Apache is installed.</codenote> 197<codenote>We'll install them after Apache is installed.</codenote>
188</pre> 198</pre>
189</body> 199</body>
200</section>
190</chapter> 201</chapter>
191<chapter> 202<chapter>
192<title>Adding SSL and SASL support to Postfix</title> 203<title>Adding SSL and SASL support to Postfix</title>
204<section>
193<body> 205<body>
194<p>Now edit the postfix config's to make it aware of your new sasl and ssl capabilities. Add the following parameters to the end of the file where they will be easy to find.</p> 206<p>Now edit the postfix config's to make it aware of your new sasl and ssl capabilities. Add the following parameters to the end of the file where they will be easy to find.</p>
195<pre caption="/etc/postfix/main.cf" > 207<pre caption="/etc/postfix/main.cf" >
196# <i>nano -w /etc/postfix/main.cf</i> 208# <i>nano -w /etc/postfix/main.cf</i>
197 209
198smtpd_sasl_auth_enable = yes 210smtpd_sasl_auth_enable = yes
199smtpd_sasl2_auth_enable = yes 211smtpd_sasl2_auth_enable = yes
200smtpd_sasl_security_options = noanonymous 212smtpd_sasl_security_options = noanonymous
201broken_sasl_auth_clients = yes 213broken_sasl_auth_clients = yes
202smtpd_sasl_local_domain = 214smtpd_sasl_local_domain =
203 215
204<codenote>The broken_sasl_auth_clients option and the login auth method </codenote> 216<codenote>The broken_sasl_auth_clients option and the login auth method </codenote>
205<codenote>are for outlook and outlook express only and are undocumented.</codenote> 217<codenote>are for outlook and outlook express only and are undocumented.</codenote>
206<codenote>Isn't having to hack software for stupid, broken, M$ BS great?</codenote> 218<codenote>Isn't having to hack software for stupid, broken, M$ BS great?</codenote>
207<codenote>smtpd_sasl_local_domain appends a domain name to clients using</codenote> 219<codenote>smtpd_sasl_local_domain appends a domain name to clients using</codenote>
242250-PIPELINING 254250-PIPELINING
243250-SIZE 10240000 255250-SIZE 10240000
244250-VRFY 256250-VRFY
245250-ETRN 257250-ETRN
246250-STARTTLS 258250-STARTTLS
247250-AUTH LOGIN PLAIN 259250-AUTH LOGIN PLAIN
248250-AUTH=LOGIN PLAIN 260250-AUTH=LOGIN PLAIN
249250-XVERP 261250-XVERP
250250 8BITMIME 262250 8BITMIME
251<i>^]</i> 263<i>^]</i>
252telnet> <i>quit</i> 264telnet> <i>quit</i>
253</pre> 265</pre>
254<p>Verify that the above AUTH and STARTTLS lines now appear in your postfix install. As I said before, as it stands now AUTH will not work. that's because sasl will try to auth against it's sasldb, instead of the shadow file for some unknown reason, which we have not set up. So we're going to just plow through and set up mysql to hold all of our auth and virtual domain information. 266<p>Verify that the above AUTH and STARTTLS lines now appear in your postfix install. As I said before, as it stands now AUTH will not work. that's because sasl will try to auth against it's sasldb, instead of the shadow file for some unknown reason, which we have not set up. So we're going to just plow through and set up mysql to hold all of our auth and virtual domain information.
255 </p> 267 </p>
256</body> 268</body>
269</section>
257</chapter> 270</chapter>
258<chapter> 271<chapter>
259<title>MySQL</title> 272<title>MySQL</title>
273<section>
260<body> 274<body>
261<p>Next we're going to install and configure MySQL. You'll need the <uri link="http://kickasskungfu.com/~ken/genericmailsql.sql" >genericmailsql.sql</uri> dumpfile for this step.</p> 275<p>Next we're going to install and configure MySQL. You'll need the <uri link="http://kickasskungfu.com/~ken/genericmailsql.sql" >genericmailsql.sql</uri> dumpfile for this step.</p>
262<pre caption="Installing and configuring MySQL" > 276<pre caption="Installing and configuring MySQL" >
263# <i>emerge mysql</i> 277# <i>emerge mysql</i>
264 278
265# <i>/usr/bin/mysql_install_db</i> 279# <i>/usr/bin/mysql_install_db</i>
266<codenote>After this command runs follow the onscreen directions</codenote> 280<codenote>After this command runs follow the onscreen directions</codenote>
267<codenote>for adding a root password with mysql,</codenote> 281<codenote>for adding a root password with mysql,</codenote>
268<codenote>not mysqladmin, otherwise your db will be wide open.</codenote> 282<codenote>not mysqladmin, otherwise your db will be wide open.</codenote>
269 283
270# <i>/etc/init.d/mysql start</i> 284# <i>/etc/init.d/mysql start</i>
271# <i>mysqladmin -u root -p create mailsql</i> 285# <i>mysqladmin -u root -p create mailsql</i>
272# <i>mysql -u root -p mailsql &lt; genericmailsql.sql</i> 286# <i>mysql -u root -p mailsql &lt; genericmailsql.sql</i>
273 287
274# <i>mysql -u root -p mysql</i> 288# <i>mysql -u root -p mysql</i>
30310 foo@virt-bar.org $password realname virtid virtid /home/vmail \ 31710 foo@virt-bar.org $password realname virtid virtid /home/vmail \
304 /home/vmail/virt-bar.org/foo/.maildir/ y 318 /home/vmail/virt-bar.org/foo/.maildir/ y
30513 foo@bar.com $password realname localid localid /home/foo \ 31913 foo@bar.com $password realname localid localid /home/foo \
306 /home/foo/.maildir/ y 320 /home/foo/.maildir/ y
307</pre> 321</pre>
308<pre caption="transport table sample" > 322<pre caption="transport table sample" >
309id domain destination 323id domain destination
3101 bar.com local: 3241 bar.com local:
3112 virt-bar.org virtual: 3252 virt-bar.org virtual:
312</pre> 326</pre>
313<pre caption="virtual table sample" > 327<pre caption="virtual table sample" >
314id email destination 328id email destination
3153 root@virt-bar.org other@email.address 3293 root@virt-bar.org other@email.address
316</pre> 330</pre>
317</body> 331</body>
332</section>
318</chapter> 333</chapter>
319<chapter> 334<chapter>
320<title>Apache and phpMyAdmin</title> 335<title>Apache and phpMyAdmin</title>
336<section>
321<body> 337<body>
322<p>Next we'll set up apache and add an interface to interact with the database more easily. </p> 338<p>Next we'll set up apache and add an interface to interact with the database more easily. </p>
323<pre caption="Setting up apache and phpmyadmin" > 339<pre caption="Setting up apache and phpmyadmin" >
324# <i>emerge apache mod_php phpmyadmin</i> 340# <i>emerge apache mod_php phpmyadmin</i>
325</pre> 341</pre>
326<p>There are plenty of guides out there about how to set up apache with php. Like this one: <uri>http://www.linuxguruz.org/z.php?id=31</uri>. There are also numerous posts on <uri>http://forums.gentoo.org</uri> detailing how to solve problems with the installation (search for 'apache php'). So, that said, I'm not going to cover it here. Set up the apache and php installs, then continue with this howto. Now, a word for the wise: .htaccess the directory that you put phpmyadmin in. If you do not do this, search engine spiders will come along and index the page which in turn will mean that anyone will be able to find your phpmyadmin page via google and in turn be able to come change your database however they want which is <e>BAD!</e> There are many howtos on this including: <uri>http://www.csoft.net/docs/micro/htaccess.html.en</uri>.</p> 342<p>There are plenty of guides out there about how to set up apache with php. Like this one: <uri>http://www.linuxguruz.org/z.php?id=31</uri>. There are also numerous posts on <uri>http://forums.gentoo.org</uri> detailing how to solve problems with the installation (search for 'apache php'). So, that said, I'm not going to cover it here. Set up the apache and php installs, then continue with this howto. Now, a word for the wise: .htaccess the directory that you put phpmyadmin in. If you do not do this, search engine spiders will come along and index the page which in turn will mean that anyone will be able to find your phpmyadmin page via google and in turn be able to come change your database however they want which is <e>BAD!</e> There are many howtos on this including: <uri>http://www.csoft.net/docs/micro/htaccess.html.en</uri>.</p>
327<p>Now we're going to install the Apache certificates we made previously. The Apache-SSL directives that you need to use the resulting cert are: 343<p>Now we're going to install the Apache certificates we made previously. The Apache-SSL directives that you need to use the resulting cert are:
328 <ul> 344 <ul>
329<li>SSLCertificateFile /path/to/certs/new.cert.cert</li> 345<li>SSLCertificateFile /path/to/certs/new.cert.cert</li>
330<li>SSLCertificateKeyFile /path/to/certs/new.cert.key</li> 346<li>SSLCertificateKeyFile /path/to/certs/new.cert.key</li>
331</ul> 347</ul>
332</p> 348</p>
333<pre caption="Install Apache SSL certificates" > 349<pre caption="Install Apache SSL certificates" >
334# <i>cp /etc/ssl/misc/new.cert.cert /etc/apache/conf/ssl/</i> 350# <i>cp /etc/ssl/misc/new.cert.cert /etc/apache/conf/ssl/</i>
335# <i>cp /etc/ssl/misc/new.cert.key /etc/apache/conf/ssl/</i> 351# <i>cp /etc/ssl/misc/new.cert.key /etc/apache/conf/ssl/</i>
347<p>Next, configure phpMyAdmin.</p> 363<p>Next, configure phpMyAdmin.</p>
348<pre caption="Configuring phpMyAdmin" > 364<pre caption="Configuring phpMyAdmin" >
349# <i>nano -w /var/www/localhost/htdocs/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php</i> 365# <i>nano -w /var/www/localhost/htdocs/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php</i>
350<codenote>Change the following parameters</codenote> 366<codenote>Change the following parameters</codenote>
351 367
352$cfg['Servers'][$i]['host'] = 'localhost'; // MySQL hostname 368$cfg['Servers'][$i]['host'] = 'localhost'; // MySQL hostname
353$cfg['Servers'][$i]['controluser'] = 'mailsql'; // MySQL control user settings 369$cfg['Servers'][$i]['controluser'] = 'mailsql'; // MySQL control user settings
354 // (this user must have read-only 370 // (this user must have read-only
355$cfg['Servers'][$i]['controlpass'] = '$password'; // access to the &quot;mysql/user&quot; 371$cfg['Servers'][$i]['controlpass'] = '$password'; // access to the &quot;mysql/user&quot;
356 // and &quot;mysql/db&quot; tables) 372 // and &quot;mysql/db&quot; tables)
357$cfg['Servers'][$i]['user'] = 'mailsql'; // MySQL user 373$cfg['Servers'][$i]['user'] = 'mailsql'; // MySQL user
358$cfg['Servers'][$i]['password'] = '$password'; // MySQL password 374$cfg['Servers'][$i]['password'] = '$password'; // MySQL password
359</pre> 375</pre>
360<p>Now enter the phpmyadmin page and browse the tables. You'll want to add in your local aliases, edit your user table to add a test user, and change your transport table to add information about your domains. The default values supplied with the dumpfile should be a sufficient guide to what values need to go where. Make sure that if you put information in the database that it is accurate. For instance, make sure the local users home dir exists and that the correct uid/gid values are in place. The maildirs should be created automatically by postfix when the user receives their first email. So, in general, it's a good idea to send a &quot;Welcome&quot; mail to a new user after you setup their account to make sure the .maildir gets created. </p> 376<p>Now enter the phpmyadmin page and browse the tables. You'll want to add in your local aliases, edit your user table to add a test user, and change your transport table to add information about your domains. The default values supplied with the dumpfile should be a sufficient guide to what values need to go where. Make sure that if you put information in the database that it is accurate. For instance, make sure the local users home dir exists and that the correct uid/gid values are in place. The maildirs should be created automatically by postfix when the user receives their first email. So, in general, it's a good idea to send a &quot;Welcome&quot; mail to a new user after you setup their account to make sure the .maildir gets created. </p>
361</body> 377</body>
378</section>
362</chapter> 379</chapter>
363<chapter> 380<chapter>
364<title>The vmail user</title> 381<title>The vmail user</title>
382<section>
365<body> 383<body>
366<p>At this point you may be wondering what user and directory to use for virtual mail users, and rightly so. Let's set that up.</p> 384<p>At this point you may be wondering what user and directory to use for virtual mail users, and rightly so. Let's set that up.</p>
367<pre caption="Adding the vmail user" > 385<pre caption="Adding the vmail user" >
368# <i>adduser -d /home/vmail -s /bin/false vmail</i> 386# <i>adduser -d /home/vmail -s /bin/false vmail</i>
369# <i>uid=`cat /etc/passwd | grep vmail | cut -f 3 -d :`</i> 387# <i>uid=`cat /etc/passwd | grep vmail | cut -f 3 -d :`</i>
370# <i>groupadd -g $uid vmail</i> 388# <i>groupadd -g $uid vmail</i>
371# <i>mkdir /home/vmail</i> 389# <i>mkdir /home/vmail</i>
372# <i>chown vmail. /home/vmail</i> 390# <i>chown vmail. /home/vmail</i>
373</pre> 391</pre>
374<p>So now when you're setting up vmail accounts, use the vmail uid, gid, and homedir. When you're setting up local accounts, use that users uid, gid, and homedir. We've been meaning to create a php admin page for this setup but haven't gotten around to it yet, as phpmyadmin generally works fine for us.</p> 392<p>So now when you're setting up vmail accounts, use the vmail uid, gid, and homedir. When you're setting up local accounts, use that users uid, gid, and homedir. We've been meaning to create a php admin page for this setup but haven't gotten around to it yet, as phpmyadmin generally works fine for us.</p>
375</body> 393</body>
394</section>
376</chapter> 395</chapter>
377<chapter> 396<chapter>
378<title>Configuring MySQL Authentication and vhosts</title> 397<title>Configuring MySQL Authentication and vhosts</title>
398<section>
379<body> 399<body>
380<p>Next we'll reconfigure our authentication to use the mailsql database in courier-imap and postfix. In all of the following examples, replace $password with the password you set for the mailsql mysql user.</p> 400<p>Next we'll reconfigure our authentication to use the mailsql database in courier-imap and postfix. In all of the following examples, replace $password with the password you set for the mailsql mysql user.</p>
381<pre> 401<pre>
382# <i>emerge pam_mysql</i> 402# <i>emerge pam_mysql</i>
383# <i>nano -w /etc/pam.d/imap</i> 403# <i>nano -w /etc/pam.d/imap</i>
384<codenote>Comment out the existing auth lines and add the following as shown.</codenote> 404<codenote>Comment out the existing auth lines and add the following as shown.</codenote>
385 405
386#auth required pam_nologin.so 406#auth required pam_nologin.so
387#auth required pam_stack.so service=system-auth 407#auth required pam_stack.so service=system-auth
388#account required pam_stack.so service=system-auth 408#account required pam_stack.so service=system-auth
389#session required pam_stack.so service=system-auth 409#session required pam_stack.so service=system-auth
390 410
391auth optional pam_mysql.so host=localhost db=mailsql user=mailsql \ 411auth optional pam_mysql.so host=localhost db=mailsql user=mailsql \
392 passwd=$password table=users usercolumn=email passwdcolumn=clear crypt=0 412 passwd=$password table=users usercolumn=email passwdcolumn=clear crypt=0
393account required pam_mysql.so host=localhost db=mailsql user=mailsql \ 413account required pam_mysql.so host=localhost db=mailsql user=mailsql \
538For security reasons you should change the permissions of the various 558For security reasons you should change the permissions of the various
539<path>/etc/mail/mysql-*.cf</path>: 559<path>/etc/mail/mysql-*.cf</path>:
540</p> 560</p>
541 561
542<pre caption="Changing file permission"> 562<pre caption="Changing file permission">
543# <i>chmod 640 /etc/postfix/mysql-*.cf</i> 563# <i>chmod 640 /etc/postfix/mysql-*.cf</i>
544# <i>chgrp postfix /etc/postfix/mysql-*.cf</i> 564# <i>chgrp postfix /etc/postfix/mysql-*.cf</i>
545</pre> 565</pre>
546 566
547<p>As of Postfix 2.0.x, there were a number of significant changes over the 1.1.x release. Notably the transport, virtual-gid, and virtual-uid tables are no longer necessary. The tables are still included if you wish to use them.</p> 567<p>As of Postfix 2.0.x, there were a number of significant changes over the 1.1.x release. Notably the transport, virtual-gid, and virtual-uid tables are no longer necessary. The tables are still included if you wish to use them.</p>
548<note>It is recommended tha you read VIRTUAL_README included with the postfix doc's for more information.</note> 568<note>It is recommended tha you read VIRTUAL_README included with the postfix doc's for more information.</note>
549<pre># <i>postfix reload</i> 569<pre># <i>postfix reload</i>
550</pre> 570</pre>
551<p>Now, if all went well, you should have a functioning mailhost. Users should be able to authenticate against the sql database, using their full email address, for pop3, imap, and smtp. I would highly suggest that you verify that everything is working at this point. If you run into problems (with as many things as this setup has going on, it's likely that you will) check the troubleshooting section of this howto.</p> 571<p>Now, if all went well, you should have a functioning mailhost. Users should be able to authenticate against the sql database, using their full email address, for pop3, imap, and smtp. I would highly suggest that you verify that everything is working at this point. If you run into problems (with as many things as this setup has going on, it's likely that you will) check the troubleshooting section of this howto.</p>
552</body> 572</body>
573</section>
553</chapter> 574</chapter>
554<chapter> 575<chapter>
555<title>Squirrelmail</title> 576<title>Squirrelmail</title>
577<section>
556<body> 578<body>
557<pre> 579<pre>
558# <i>emerge squirrelmail</i> 580# <i>emerge squirrelmail</i>
559<codenote>I like to add a link to the htdocs space for a shorter url.</codenote> 581<codenote>I like to add a link to the htdocs space for a shorter url.</codenote>
560 582
561# <i>ln -s /var/www/localhost/htdocs/squirrelmail/ /var/www/localhost/htdocs/mail</i> 583# <i>ln -s /var/www/localhost/htdocs/squirrelmail/ /var/www/localhost/htdocs/mail</i>
562# <i>cd /var/www/localhost/htdocs/mail/conf</i> 584# <i>cd /var/www/localhost/htdocs/mail/conf</i>
563# <i>./conf.pl</i> 585# <i>./conf.pl</i>
564<codenote>Change your Organization, Server, and Folder settings for squirrelmail.</codenote> 586<codenote>Change your Organization, Server, and Folder settings for squirrelmail.</codenote>
565<codenote>Now you should be able to login to squirrelmail, again - with your full email address,</codenote> 587<codenote>Now you should be able to login to squirrelmail, again - with your full email address,</codenote>
566<codenote>and use your new webmail setup.</codenote> 588<codenote>and use your new webmail setup.</codenote>
567</pre> 589</pre>
568</body> 590</body>
591</section>
569</chapter> 592</chapter>
570<chapter> 593<chapter>
571<title>Mailman</title> 594<title>Mailman</title>
595<section>
572<body> 596<body>
573<p>Last step: mailman. The new version of mailman has very nice virtual domain support, which is why I use it, not to mention it's really a great package. To get this package installed and working correctly for virtual domains is going to require a bit of hacking. I really recommend reading all of the mailman documentation, including README.POSTFIX.gz, to understand what's being done here.</p> 597<p>Last step: mailman. The new version of mailman has very nice virtual domain support, which is why I use it, not to mention it's really a great package. To get this package installed and working correctly for virtual domains is going to require a bit of hacking. I really recommend reading all of the mailman documentation, including README.POSTFIX.gz, to understand what's being done here.</p>
574<p>One further note, current versions of mailman install to /usr/local/mailman. If you're like me and wish to change the default install location, it can be overridden in the ebuild filoe by changing the INSTALLDIR variable.</p> 598<p>One further note, current versions of mailman install to /usr/local/mailman. If you're like me and wish to change the default install location, it can be overridden in the ebuild filoe by changing the INSTALLDIR variable.</p>
575<pre caption="/usr/portage/net-mail/mailman/mailman-$ver.ebuild"> 599<pre caption="/usr/portage/net-mail/mailman/mailman-$ver.ebuild">
576# <i>nano -w /usr/portage/net-mail/mailman/mailman-$ver.ebuild</i> 600# <i>nano -w /usr/portage/net-mail/mailman/mailman-$ver.ebuild</i>
577MAILGID="280" 601MAILGID="280"
578<codenote>Set MAILGID to the mailman group instead of nobody</codenote> 602<codenote>Set MAILGID to the mailman group instead of nobody</codenote>
579<codenote>This is needed for postfix integration</codenote> 603<codenote>This is needed for postfix integration</codenote>
580</pre> 604</pre>
581<pre> 605<pre>
582# <i>emerge mailman</i> 606# <i>emerge mailman</i>
583<codenote>This package is currently masked as well, so you'll need to unmask it or give </codenote> 607<codenote>This package is currently masked as well, so you'll need to unmask it or give </codenote>
584<codenote>emerge an explicit path to the ebuild. Once it's installed, follow the directions</codenote> 608<codenote>emerge an explicit path to the ebuild. Once it's installed, follow the directions</codenote>
585<codenote>in the README.gentoo.gz *except* do not add your aliases to /etc/mail/aliases.</codenote> 609<codenote>in the README.gentoo.gz *except* do not add your aliases to /etc/mail/aliases.</codenote>
586<codenote>We will instead be linking the entire alias db into postfix.</codenote> 610<codenote>We will instead be linking the entire alias db into postfix.</codenote>
645alias_maps = 669alias_maps =
646 hash:/var/mailman/data/aliases, 670 hash:/var/mailman/data/aliases,
647 mysql:/etc/postfix/mysql-aliases.cf 671 mysql:/etc/postfix/mysql-aliases.cf
648 672
649virtual_alias_maps = 673virtual_alias_maps =
650 hash:/var/mailman/data/virtual-mailman, 674 hash:/var/mailman/data/virtual-mailman,
651 mysql:/etc/postfix/mysql-virtual.cf 675 mysql:/etc/postfix/mysql-virtual.cf
652<codenote>This adds mailman alias file support to postfix</codenote> 676<codenote>This adds mailman alias file support to postfix</codenote>
653<codenote>You may of course use the mysql tables for this,</codenote> 677<codenote>You may of course use the mysql tables for this,</codenote>
654<codenote>but I hate doing that by hand. Also, if you are not</codenote> 678<codenote>but I hate doing that by hand. Also, if you are not</codenote>
655<codenote>using virtual domains, adding the virtual alias maps</codenote> 679<codenote>using virtual domains, adding the virtual alias maps</codenote>
656<codenote>to postfix may cause problems, be warned.</codenote> 680<codenote>to postfix may cause problems, be warned.</codenote>
657</pre> 681</pre>
658<p> You should now be able to setup mailing lists for any domain on your box. Last note on this, make sure you run all mailman commands as the user mailman (<c>su mailman</c>) or else the permissions will be wrong and you'll have to fix them. Read the mailman doc's for more information on setting up and managing mailman lists.</p> 682<p> You should now be able to setup mailing lists for any domain on your box. Last note on this, make sure you run all mailman commands as the user mailman (<c>su mailman</c>) or else the permissions will be wrong and you'll have to fix them. Read the mailman doc's for more information on setting up and managing mailman lists.</p>
659</body> 683</body>
684</section>
660</chapter> 685</chapter>
661<chapter> 686<chapter>
662<title>Content Filtering and Anti-Virus</title> 687<title>Content Filtering and Anti-Virus</title>
688<section>
663<body><p>Coming soon...it would be done already but I need some perl help and testing to make it so. If you'd like to volunteer for that, please email me.</p></body> 689<body><p>Coming soon...it would be done already but I need some perl help and testing to make it so. If you'd like to volunteer for that, please email me.</p></body>
690</section>
664</chapter> 691</chapter>
665<chapter> 692<chapter>
666<title>Wrap Up</title> 693<title>Wrap Up</title>
694<section>
667<body> 695<body>
668<p>Ok, you're all set, edit <path>/etc/postfix/master.cf</path> and turn off verbose mode for production use. You'll probably also want to add the services to your startup routine to make sure everything comes back up on a reboot. Make sure to add all the services you're using - apache, mysql, saslauthd, postfix, courier-imapd, courier-imapd-ssl, courier-pop3d, and courier-pop3d-ssl are all up to your decision on what access you want to provide. I generally have all the services enabled.</p> 696<p>Ok, you're all set, edit <path>/etc/postfix/master.cf</path> and turn off verbose mode for production use. You'll probably also want to add the services to your startup routine to make sure everything comes back up on a reboot. Make sure to add all the services you're using - apache, mysql, saslauthd, postfix, courier-imapd, courier-imapd-ssl, courier-pop3d, and courier-pop3d-ssl are all up to your decision on what access you want to provide. I generally have all the services enabled.</p>
669<pre caption="Wrap up" > 697<pre caption="Wrap up" >
670# <i>postfix reload</i> 698# <i>postfix reload</i>
671# <i>rc-update add $service default</i> 699# <i>rc-update add $service default</i>
672</pre> 700</pre>
673<p> 701<p>
674<e>Have fun!</e> 702<e>Have fun!</e>
675</p> 703</p>
676</body> 704</body>
705</section>
677</chapter> 706</chapter>
678<chapter> 707<chapter>
679<title>Troubleshooting</title> 708<title>Troubleshooting</title>
680<section> 709<section>
681<title>Introduction</title> 710<title>Introduction</title>
682<body> 711<body>
683<p>Troubleshooting: This is a short troubleshooting guide for the set up we've detailed how to install here. It is not exhaustive, but meant as a place to get you started in figuring out problems. With a complicated setup such as this, it's imperative that you narrow down the problem to the particular component that is malfunctioning. In general I do that by following a few steps. Start from the base of the system and work your way up, ruling out components that work along the way until you discover which component is having the problem.</p> 712<p>Troubleshooting: This is a short troubleshooting guide for the set up we've detailed how to install here. It is not exhaustive, but meant as a place to get you started in figuring out problems. With a complicated setup such as this, it's imperative that you narrow down the problem to the particular component that is malfunctioning. In general I do that by following a few steps. Start from the base of the system and work your way up, ruling out components that work along the way until you discover which component is having the problem.</p>
684</body> 713</body>
685</section> 714</section>
686<section> 715<section>
687<title>Step 1: Check your config files.</title> 716<title>Step 1: Check your config files.</title>
688<body> 717<body>
689<p>Typos are killers, especially when dealing with authentication systems. Scan your config's and mailsql database for typo's. You can debug all you want, but if you're not passing the right information back and forth to your mail system, it's not going to work. If you make a change to a config file for a service, make sure you restart that service so that the config change gets picked up.</p> 718<p>Typos are killers, especially when dealing with authentication systems. Scan your config's and mailsql database for typo's. You can debug all you want, but if you're not passing the right information back and forth to your mail system, it's not going to work. If you make a change to a config file for a service, make sure you restart that service so that the config change gets picked up.</p>
690<pre> 719<pre>
691# <i>/etc/init.d/service restart</i> 720# <i>/etc/init.d/service restart</i>

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