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36 <author title="Editor"> 36 <author title="Editor">
37 <mail link="">Colin Morey</mail> 37 <mail link="">Colin Morey</mail>
38 </author> 38 </author>
39 <author title="Editor"> 39 <author title="Editor">
40 <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail> 40 <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail>
41 </author> 41 </author>
42 <author title="Editor"> 42 <author title="Editor">
43 <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail> 43 <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail>
44 </author> 44 </author>
45 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 45 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
46 Linux 1.4_rc3. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 46 Linux 1.4_rc3. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
47 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 47 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
48 scratch. 48 scratch.
49 </abstract> 49 </abstract>
50<version>2.6</version> 50<version>2.6</version>
51 <date>04 Apr 2003</date> 51 <date>09 Apr 2003</date>
52 <chapter> 52 <chapter>
53 <title>About the Install</title> 53 <title>About the Install</title>
54 <section> 54 <section>
55 <body> 55 <body>
56 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 56 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
57as many SCSI CD-ROM drives, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 57as many SCSI CD-ROM drives, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
58Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the 58Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the
59kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In 59kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In
60addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that 60addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that
61Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and 61Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and
62establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and to download 62establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and to download
63files. </p> 63files. </p>
64 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 64 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
65ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo Linux has been successfully 65ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo Linux has been successfully
66built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully 66built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully
884 provides later: 884 provides later:
885 </p> 885 </p>
886<pre caption="Activating Swap"> 886<pre caption="Activating Swap">
887# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c> 887# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c>
888</pre> 888</pre>
889 889
890 <p>Next, we will create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mount points, 890 <p>Next, we will create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mount points,
891 and we will mount our filesystems to these mount points. Once our boot and root filesystems are 891 and we will mount our filesystems to these mount points. Once our boot and root filesystems are
892 mounted, any files we copy or create inside <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> will be placed on our new filesystems. 892 mounted, any files we copy or create inside <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> will be placed on our new filesystems.
893 Note that if you are setting up Gentoo 893 Note that if you are setting up Gentoo
894 Linux with separate <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> filesystems, these would get mounted to 894 Linux with separate <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> filesystems, these would get mounted to
895 <path>/mnt/gentoo/usr</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/var</path> respectively. 895 <path>/mnt/gentoo/usr</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/var</path> respectively.
896 </p> 896 </p>
897 897
898 <impo>If your <e>boot</e> partition (the one holding the kernel) is ReiserFS, be sure to mount it 898 <impo>If your <e>boot</e> partition (the one holding the kernel) is ReiserFS, be sure to mount it
899 with the <c>-o notail</c> option so GRUB gets properly installed. Make sure 899 with the <c>-o notail</c> option so GRUB gets properly installed. Make sure
900 that <c>notail</c> ends up in your new <path>/etc/fstab</path> boot partition entry, too. 900 that <c>notail</c> ends up in your new <path>/etc/fstab</path> boot partition entry, too.
901 We will get to that in a bit. If you are going to use LILO with ReiserFS, then the <c>-o notail</c> 901 We will get to that in a bit. If you are going to use LILO with ReiserFS, then the <c>-o notail</c>
902 is not needed. It's always safe to specify the <c>-o notail</c> option with ReiserFS if you're 902 is not needed. It's always safe to specify the <c>-o notail</c> option with ReiserFS if you're
903 not sure what to do. 903 not sure what to do.
904 </impo> 904 </impo>
905 905
906<pre caption="Creating Mount Points"> 906<pre caption="Creating Mount Points">
907# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c> 907# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c>
908# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c> 908# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c>
909# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 909# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
910# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 910# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
911</pre> 911</pre>
912 912
913 <impo>If you are having problems mounting your boot partition with ext2, try using 913 <impo>If you are having problems mounting your boot partition with ext2, try using
914 <c>mount /dev/hXX /mnt/gentoo/boot -t ext2 </c> </impo> 914 <c>mount /dev/hXX /mnt/gentoo/boot -t ext2 </c> </impo>
1307 &quot;SCSI generic support&quot; (again, I usually compile them as modules). If you 1307 &quot;SCSI generic support&quot; (again, I usually compile them as modules). If you
1308 also choose to use modules, then <c>echo -e &quot;ide-scsi\nsg\nsr_mod&quot; 1308 also choose to use modules, then <c>echo -e &quot;ide-scsi\nsg\nsr_mod&quot;
1309 &gt;&gt; /etc/modules.autoload</c> to have them automatically added at boot time. 1309 &gt;&gt; /etc/modules.autoload</c> to have them automatically added at boot time.
1310 </p> 1310 </p>
1311 <note> 1311 <note>
1312 For those who prefer it, 1312 For those who prefer it,
1313 it is now possible to install Gentoo Linux with a 2.2 kernel. 1313 it is now possible to install Gentoo Linux with a 2.2 kernel.
1314 However, doing this comes at a price: 1314 However, doing this comes at a price:
1315 you will lose many of the nifty features that 1315 you will lose many of the nifty features that
1316 are new to the 2.4 series kernels (such as XFS and tmpfs 1316 are new to the 2.4 series kernels (such as XFS and tmpfs
1317 filesystems, iptables, and more), although the 2.2 kernel sources can be 1317 filesystems, iptables, and more), although the 2.2 kernel sources can be
1318 patched with ReiserFS and devfs support. 1318 patched with ReiserFS and devfs support.
1319 Gentoo linux boot scripts require either tmpfs or ramdisk support in the kernel, so 1319 Gentoo linux boot scripts require either tmpfs or ramdisk support in the kernel, so
1320 2.2 kernel users need to make sure that ramdisk support is compiled in (ie, not a module). 1320 2.2 kernel users need to make sure that ramdisk support is compiled in (ie, not a module).
1321 It is <comment>vital</comment> that a <e>gentoo=notmpfs</e> flag be added to the kernel 1321 It is <comment>vital</comment> that a <e>gentoo=notmpfs</e> flag be added to the kernel
1322 line in <path>/boot/grub/grub.conf</path> or to the append line in <path>/etc/lilo.conf</path> for the 2.2 kernel so 1322 line in <path>/boot/grub/grub.conf</path> or to the append line in <path>/etc/lilo.conf</path> for the 2.2 kernel so
1323 that a ramdisk is mounted for the boot scripts instead of tmpfs. If you choose not to use devfs, then 1323 that a ramdisk is mounted for the boot scripts instead of tmpfs. If you choose not to use devfs, then
1324 <e>gentoo=notmpfs,nodevfs</e> should be used instead. 1324 <e>gentoo=notmpfs,nodevfs</e> should be used instead.
1325 </note> 1325 </note>
1326 <p>Your new custom kernel (and modules) are now installed. Now you need to choose a system 1326 <p>Your new custom kernel (and modules) are now installed. Now you need to choose a system
1327 logger that you would like to install. We offer sysklogd, which is the traditional set 1327 logger that you would like to install. We offer sysklogd, which is the traditional set
1328 of system logging daemons. We also have msyslog and syslog-ng as well as metalog. Power users seem 1328 of system logging daemons. We also have msyslog and syslog-ng as well as metalog. Power users seem
1329 to gravitate away from sysklogd (not very good performance) and towards the 1329 to gravitate away from sysklogd (not very good performance) and towards the
1330 newer alternatives. 1330 newer alternatives.
1331 If in doubt, you may want to try metalog, since it seems to be quite popular. 1331 If in doubt, you may want to try metalog, since it seems to be quite popular.
1332 To merge your logger of choice, type <e>one</e> of the next four lines: 1332 To merge your logger of choice, type <e>one</e> of the next four lines:
1333 </p> 1333 </p>
1334<pre caption="Emerging System Logger of Choice"> 1334<pre caption="Emerging System Logger of Choice">
1335# <c>emerge app-admin/sysklogd</c> 1335# <c>emerge app-admin/sysklogd</c>
1336# <c>rc-update add sysklogd default</c> 1336# <c>rc-update add sysklogd default</c>
1337<comment>or</comment> 1337<comment>or</comment>
1584 pinch, wouldn't it? :)</impo> 1584 pinch, wouldn't it? :)</impo>
1585 1585
1586 </body> 1586 </body>
1587 </section> 1587 </section>
1588 <section> 1588 <section>
1589 <title>Configuring GRUB</title> 1589 <title>Configuring GRUB</title>
1590 <body> 1590 <body>
1591 <p>The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how GRUB 1591 <p>The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how GRUB
1592 refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition <path>/dev/hda1</path> is called 1592 refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition <path>/dev/hda1</path> is called
1593 <path>(hd0,0)</path> under GRUB. Notice the parenthesis around the hd0,0 - they are required. 1593 <path>(hd0,0)</path> under GRUB. Notice the parenthesis around the hd0,0 - they are required.
1594 Hard drives count from zero rather than &quot;a&quot;, and partitions start at zero rather than one. 1594 Hard drives count from zero rather than &quot;a&quot;, and partitions start at zero rather than one.
1595 Be aware too that with the hd devices, only harddrives are counted, not atapi-ide devices such as 1595 Be aware too that with the hd devices, only harddrives are counted, not atapi-ide devices such as
1596 cdrom players, burners, and that the same construct can be used with scsi drives. 1596 cdrom players, burners, and that the same construct can be used with scsi drives.
1597 (Normally they get higher numbers than ide drives except when the bios is configured 1597 (Normally they get higher numbers than ide drives except when the bios is configured
1598 to boot from scsi devices.) Assuming you have a harddrive on /dev/hda, a cdrom player on /dev/hdb, 1598 to boot from scsi devices.) Assuming you have a harddrive on /dev/hda, a cdrom player on /dev/hdb,
1599 a burner on /dev/hdc and a second hard drive on /dev/hdd, for example, and no scsi harddrive 1599 a burner on /dev/hdc, a second hard drive on /dev/hdd and no scsi harddrive,
1600 <path>/dev/hdd7</path> gets translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>. 1600 <path>/dev/hdd7</path> gets translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>.
1601 1601
1602 It might sound tricky, and tricky it is indeed, but as we will see, grub 1602 It might sound tricky, and tricky it is indeed, but as we will see, grub
1603 offers a tab completion mechanism that comes handy for those of you having 1603 offers a tab completion mechanism that comes handy for those of you having
1604 a lot of harddrives and partitions and who are a little lost in the 1604 a lot of harddrives and partitions and who are a little lost in the
1605 grub numbering scheme. Having gotten the feel for that, 1605 grub numbering scheme. Having gotten the feel for that,
1606 it is time to install GRUB. 1606 it is time to install GRUB.
1607 </p> 1607 </p>
1608 <p>The easiest way to install GRUB is to simply type <c>grub</c> at your chrooted shell prompt: </p> 1608 <p>The easiest way to install GRUB is to simply type <c>grub</c> at your chrooted shell prompt: </p>
1609<pre caption="Installing GRUB"> 1609<pre caption="Installing GRUB">
1610# <c>emerge grub</c> 1610# <c>emerge grub</c>
1611# <c>grub</c> 1611# <c>grub</c>
1612</pre> 1612</pre>
1613 <impo>If you are using hardware RAID this part will not work at 1613 <impo>If you are using hardware RAID this part will not work at
1614 this time. 1614 this time.
1781<pre caption="Running LILO"> 1781<pre caption="Running LILO">
1782# <c>/sbin/lilo</c> 1782# <c>/sbin/lilo</c>
1783</pre> 1783</pre>
1784 <p>LILO is configured, and now your machine is ready to boot into Gentoo Linux! 1784 <p>LILO is configured, and now your machine is ready to boot into Gentoo Linux!
1785 </p> 1785 </p>
1786 </body> 1786 </body>
1787 </section> 1787 </section>
1788 </chapter> 1788 </chapter>
1789 <chapter> 1789 <chapter>
1790 <title>Creating Bootdisks</title> 1790 <title>Creating Bootdisks</title>
1791 <section> 1791 <section>
1792 <title>GRUB Bootdisks</title> 1792 <title>GRUB Bootdisks</title>
1793 <body> 1793 <body>
1794 <p>It is always a good idea to make a boot disk the first 1794 <p>It is always a good idea to make a boot disk the first
1795 time you install any Linux distribution. This is a security 1795 time you install any Linux distribution. This is a security
1796 blanket, and generally not a bad thing to do. If you are using some kinds of hardware RAID, you may <e>need</e> make a GRUB boot 1796 blanket, and generally not a bad thing to do. If you are using some kinds of hardware RAID, you may <e>need</e> to make a GRUB boot
1797 disk. With these types of hardware RAID, 1797 disk. With these types of hardware RAID,
1798 if you try to install grub from your chrooted shell it will fail. If you are in this camp, 1798 if you try to install grub from your chrooted shell it will fail. If you are in this camp,
1799 make a GRUB 1799 make a GRUB
1800 boot disk, and when you reboot the first time you can install GRUB 1800 boot disk, and when you reboot the first time you can install GRUB
1801 to the MBR. Make your 1801 to the MBR. Make your
1802 bootdisks like this: 1802 bootdisks like this:
1803 </p> 1803 </p>
1804<pre caption="Creating a GRUB Bootdisk"> 1804<pre caption="Creating a GRUB Bootdisk">
1805# <c>mke2fs /dev/fd0</c> 1805# <c>mke2fs /dev/fd0</c>
1806# <c>mount /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy</c> 1806# <c>mount /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy</c>
1807# <c>mkdir -p /mnt/floppy/boot/grub</c> 1807# <c>mkdir -p /mnt/floppy/boot/grub</c>
1808# <c>cp /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/stage1 /mnt/floppy/boot/grub/</c> 1808# <c>cp /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/stage1 /mnt/floppy/boot/grub/</c>
1809# <c>cp /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/stage2 /mnt/floppy/boot/grub/</c> 1809# <c>cp /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/stage2 /mnt/floppy/boot/grub/</c>
1810# <c>umount /mnt/floppy</c> 1810# <c>umount /mnt/floppy</c>
1811# <c>grub</c> 1811# <c>grub</c>

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