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39 <author title="Editor"> 39 <author title="Editor">
40 <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail> 40 <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail>
41 </author> 41 </author>
42 <author title="Editor"> 42 <author title="Editor">
43 <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail> 43 <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail>
44 </author> 44 </author>
45 <author title="Editor"> 45 <author title="Editor">
46 <mail link="swift@gentoo.org">Sven Vermeulen</mail> 46 <mail link="swift@gentoo.org">Sven Vermeulen</mail>
47 </author> 47 </author>
48 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 48 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
49 Linux 1.4_rc4. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 49 Linux 1.4_rc4. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
50 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 50 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
51 scratch. 51 scratch.
52 </abstract> 52 </abstract>
53<version>2.6.1</version> 53<version>2.6.1</version>
54 <date>8 May 2003</date> 54 <date>10 May 2003</date>
55 <chapter> 55 <chapter>
56 <title>About the Install</title> 56 <title>About the Install</title>
57 <section> 57 <section>
58 <body> 58 <body>
59 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 59 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
60as many SCSI CD-ROM drives, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 60as many SCSI CD-ROM drives, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
61Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the 61Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the
62kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In 62kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In
63addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that 63addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that
64Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and 64Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and
65establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and to download 65establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and to download
66files. </p> 66files. </p>
67 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 67 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
68ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo Linux has been successfully 68ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo Linux has been successfully
69built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully 69built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully
373 DHCP, skip down to the static configuration section below. </p> 373 DHCP, skip down to the static configuration section below. </p>
374<pre caption="Network configuration with DHCP"> 374<pre caption="Network configuration with DHCP">
375# <c>dhcpcd eth0</c> 375# <c>dhcpcd eth0</c>
376</pre> 376</pre>
377 <note>Some ISPs require you to provide a hostname. To do that, 377 <note>Some ISPs require you to provide a hostname. To do that,
378 add a <c>-h myhostname</c> flag to the dhcpcd command line above. 378 add a <c>-h myhostname</c> flag to the dhcpcd command line above.
379 </note> 379 </note>
380 <p>If you receive <i>dhcpConfig</i> warnings, don't panic; the errors 380 <p>If you receive <i>dhcpConfig</i> warnings, don't panic; the errors
381 are most likely cosmetic. Skip down to Network testing below.</p> 381 are most likely cosmetic. Skip down to Network testing below.</p>
382 </body> 382 </body>
383 </section> 383 </section>
384 <section> 384 <section>
385 <title>Manual Static Configuration</title> 385 <title>Manual Static Configuration</title>
386 <body> 386 <body>
387 <p>We need to setup just enough networking so that we can download 387 <p>We need to setup just enough networking so that we can download
388 sources for the system build, as well as the required localhost interface. 388 sources for the system build, as well as the required localhost interface. The needed information is explained in the next table.</p>
389
390<table>
391<tr><th>Information</th><th>Description</th><th>Example value</th></tr>
392<tr><ti>IP address</ti><ti>The IP-address you want to assign to your network card</ti><ti>192.168.1.2</ti></tr>
393<tr><ti>Broadcast address</ti><ti>The IP-address which will broadcast the packets to all the hosts in the network.</ti><ti>192.168.1.255</ti></tr>
394<tr><ti>Network mask</ti><ti>The mask which is used together with the IP address to see what part of the address is for network-identification and host-identification</ti><ti>255.255.255.0</ti></tr>
395<tr><ti>Gateway</ti><ti>The IP-address of the computer which will forward the packets that are not meant for the local network (most of the time the computer which shares the internet connection)</ti></tr>
396</table>
397
389 Type in the following commands, replacing 398 <p>Type in the following commands, replacing
390 $IFACE with your network interface (typically <c>eth0</c>), $IPNUM 399 $IFACE with your network interface (typically <c>eth0</c>), $IPNUM
391 with your IP address, $BCAST with your broadcast address, and $NMASK 400 with your IP address, $BCAST with your broadcast address, and $NMASK
392 with your network mask. For the <c>route</c> command, replace 401 with your network mask. For the <c>route</c> command, replace
393 $GTWAY with your default gateway. 402 $GTWAY with your default gateway.
394 </p> 403 </p>
395<pre caption="Static IP Network Configuration"> 404<pre caption="Static IP Network Configuration">
396# <c>ifconfig $IFACE $IPNUM broadcast $BCAST netmask $NMASK</c> 405# <c>ifconfig $IFACE $IPNUM broadcast $BCAST netmask $NMASK</c>
397# <c>/sbin/route add -net default gw $GTWAY netmask 0.0.0.0 metric 1</c> 406# <c>/sbin/route add -net default gw $GTWAY netmask 0.0.0.0 metric 1 $IFACE</c>
398</pre> 407</pre>
399 <p>Now it is time to create the <path>/etc/resolv.conf</path> 408 <p>Now it is time to create the <path>/etc/resolv.conf</path>
400 file so that name resolution (finding Web/FTP sites by name, rather 409 file so that name resolution (finding Web/FTP sites by name, rather
401 than just by IP address) will work. You can use <c>nano -w 410 than just by IP address) will work. You can use <c>nano -w
402 /etc/resolv.conf</c> to create <path>/etc/resolv.conf</path>. 411 /etc/resolv.conf</c> to create <path>/etc/resolv.conf</path>.
403 <c>nano</c> is a small and easy-to-use editor.</p> 412 <c>nano</c> is a small and easy-to-use editor.</p>
404 <p>Here is a template to follow for creating your /etc/resolv.conf file: </p> 413 <p>Here is a template to follow for creating your /etc/resolv.conf file: </p>
405<pre caption="/etc/resolv.conf template"> 414<pre caption="/etc/resolv.conf template">
406domain mydomain.com 415domain mydomain.com
407nameserver 10.0.0.1 416nameserver 10.0.0.1
408nameserver 10.0.0.2 417nameserver 10.0.0.2
409</pre> 418</pre>
410 <p>Replace <c>10.0.0.1</c> and <c>10.0.0.2</c> with the IP addresses of your 419 <p>Replace <c>10.0.0.1</c> and <c>10.0.0.2</c> with the IP addresses of your
411 primary and secondary DNS servers respectively.</p> 420 primary and secondary DNS servers respectively.</p>
412 </body> 421 </body>
980 mounted, any files we copy or create inside <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> will be placed on our new filesystems. 989 mounted, any files we copy or create inside <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> will be placed on our new filesystems.
981 Note that if you are setting up Gentoo 990 Note that if you are setting up Gentoo
982 Linux with separate <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> filesystems, these would get mounted to 991 Linux with separate <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path> filesystems, these would get mounted to
983 <path>/mnt/gentoo/usr</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/var</path> respectively. 992 <path>/mnt/gentoo/usr</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/var</path> respectively.
984 </p> 993 </p>
985 994
986 <impo>If your <e>boot</e> partition (the one holding the kernel) is ReiserFS, be sure to mount it 995 <impo>If your <e>boot</e> partition (the one holding the kernel) is ReiserFS, be sure to mount it
987 with the <c>-o notail</c> option so GRUB gets properly installed. Make sure 996 with the <c>-o notail</c> option so GRUB gets properly installed. Make sure
988 that <c>notail</c> ends up in your new <path>/etc/fstab</path> boot partition entry, too. 997 that <c>notail</c> ends up in your new <path>/etc/fstab</path> boot partition entry, too.
989 We will get to that in a bit. If you are going to use LILO with ReiserFS, then the <c>-o notail</c> 998 We will get to that in a bit. If you are going to use LILO with ReiserFS, then the <c>-o notail</c>
990 is not needed. It's always safe to specify the <c>-o notail</c> option with ReiserFS if you're 999 is not needed. It's always safe to specify the <c>-o notail</c> option with ReiserFS if you're
991 not sure what to do. 1000 not sure what to do.
992 </impo> 1001 </impo>
993 1002
994<pre caption="Creating Mount Points"> 1003<pre caption="Creating Mount Points">
995# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c>
996# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c> 1004# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c>
997# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 1005# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
998# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 1006# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
999</pre> 1007</pre>
1000 1008
1001 <impo>If you are having problems mounting your boot partition with ext2, try using 1009 <impo>If you are having problems mounting your boot partition with ext2, try using
1002 <c>mount /dev/hXX /mnt/gentoo/boot -t ext2 </c> </impo> 1010 <c>mount /dev/hXX /mnt/gentoo/boot -t ext2 </c> </impo>
1003 </body> 1011 </body>
1004 </section> 1012 </section>
1005 </chapter> 1013 </chapter>
1006 <chapter> 1014 <chapter>
1007 <title>Stage tarballs and chroot</title> 1015 <title>Stage tarballs and chroot</title>
1008 <section> 1016 <section>
1009 <title>Selecting the desired stage tarball</title> 1017 <title>Selecting the desired stage tarball</title>
1010 <body> 1018 <body>
1244 <body> 1252 <body>
1245 <note>This section is for those <b>starting</b> with stage3, and not for those who have started 1253 <note>This section is for those <b>starting</b> with stage3, and not for those who have started
1246 with stage1 or stage2 who should skip this section.</note> 1254 with stage1 or stage2 who should skip this section.</note>
1247 1255
1248 <p>The stage3 tarball provides a fully-functional basic Gentoo system, so no building is required. 1256 <p>The stage3 tarball provides a fully-functional basic Gentoo system, so no building is required.
1249 However, since the stage3 tarball is pre-built, it may be slightly out-of-date. If this is a concern 1257 However, since the stage3 tarball is pre-built, it may be slightly out-of-date. If this is a concern
1250 for you, you can automatically update your existing stage3 to contain the most up-to-date versions of all system packages 1258 for you, you can automatically update your existing stage3 to contain the most up-to-date versions of all system packages
1251 by performing the following steps. Note that this could take a long time if your stage3 is very old; 1259 by performing the following steps. Note that this could take a long time if your stage3 is very old;
1252 otherwise, this process will generally be quick and will allow you to benefit from the very latest 1260 otherwise, this process will generally be quick and will allow you to benefit from the very latest
1253 Gentoo updates and fixes. 1261 Gentoo updates and fixes.
1254 In any case, feel free to skip these 1262 In any case, feel free to skip these
1255 steps and proceed to the next section if you like. 1263 steps and proceed to the next section if you like.
1256 </p> 1264 </p>
1257 1265
1258<pre caption="Getting up-to-date"> 1266<pre caption="Getting up-to-date">
1259# <c>export CONFIG_PROTECT="-*"</c> 1267# <c>export CONFIG_PROTECT="-* /etc/make.conf"</c>
1260# <c>emerge -up system</c> 1268# <c>emerge -up system</c>
1261<comment>(lists the packages that would be installed)</comment> 1269<comment>(lists the packages that would be installed)</comment>
1262# <c>emerge -u system</c> 1270# <c>emerge -u system</c>
1263<comment>(actually merges the packages)</comment> 1271<comment>(actually merges the packages)</comment>
1264# <c>unset CONFIG_PROTECT</c> 1272# <c>unset CONFIG_PROTECT</c>
1265</pre> 1273</pre>
1266 </body> 1274 </body>
1267 </section> 1275 </section>
1268 </chapter> 1276 </chapter>
1269 <chapter> 1277 <chapter>
1270 <title>Setting your time zone</title> 1278 <title>Setting your time zone</title>
1271 <section> 1279 <section>
1272 <body> 1280 <body>
1273 <p>Now you need to set your time zone.</p> 1281 <p>Now you need to set your time zone.</p>
1274 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time) 1282 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time)
1472# <c>emerge sys-apps/fcron</c> 1480# <c>emerge sys-apps/fcron</c>
1473# <c>rc-update add fcron default</c> 1481# <c>rc-update add fcron default</c>
1474# <c>crontab /etc/crontab</c> 1482# <c>crontab /etc/crontab</c>
1475<comment>or</comment> 1483<comment>or</comment>
1476# <c>emerge sys-apps/vcron</c> 1484# <c>emerge sys-apps/vcron</c>
1477# <c>rc-update add vcron default</c> 1485# <c>rc-update add vcron default</c>
1478<comment>You do not need to run <c>crontab /etc/crontab</c> if using vcron.</comment> 1486<comment>You do not need to run <c>crontab /etc/crontab</c> if using vcron.</comment>
1479</pre> 1487</pre>
1480 <p>For more information on starting programs and daemons at startup, see the 1488 <p>For more information on starting programs and daemons at startup, see the
1481 <uri link="/doc/en/rc-scripts.xml">rc-script guide</uri>. 1489 <uri link="/doc/en/rc-scripts.xml">rc-script guide</uri>.
1482 </p> 1490 </p>
1483 </body> 1491 </body>
1484 </section> 1492 </section>
1485 </chapter> 1493 </chapter>
1486 <chapter> 1494 <chapter>
1487 <title>Installing miscellany necessary packages</title> 1495 <title>Installing miscellaneous necessary packages</title>
1488 <section> 1496 <section>
1489 <body> 1497 <body>
1490 <p>If you need rp-pppoe to connect to the net, be aware that at this point 1498 <p>If you need rp-pppoe to connect to the net, be aware that at this point
1491 it has not been installed. It would be the good time to do it. </p> 1499 it has not been installed. It would be the good time to do it. </p>
1492<pre caption="Installing rp-pppoe"> 1500<pre caption="Installing rp-pppoe">
1493# <c>USE="-X" emerge rp-pppoe</c> 1501# <c>USE="-X" emerge rp-pppoe</c>
1494</pre> 1502</pre>
1495 1503
1496 <note>The <i>USE="-X"</i> prevents pppoe from installing its optional X interface, which is a good thing, 1504 <note>The <i>USE="-X"</i> prevents pppoe from installing its optional X interface, which is a good thing,
1497 because X and its dependencies would also be emerged. You can always recompile <i>rp-pppoe</i> with 1505 because X and its dependencies would also be emerged. You can always recompile <i>rp-pppoe</i> with
1498 X support later. 1506 X support later.
1499 </note> 1507 </note>
1500 <note> Please note that the rp-pppoe is built but not configured. 1508 <note> Please note that the rp-pppoe is built but not configured.
1501 You will have to do it again using <c>adsl-setup</c> when you boot into your Gentoo system 1509 You will have to do it again using <c>adsl-setup</c> when you boot into your Gentoo system
1502 for the first time. 1510 for the first time.
1675 <body> 1683 <body>
1676 <p> In the spirit of Gentoo, users now have more than one bootloader to choose from. 1684 <p> In the spirit of Gentoo, users now have more than one bootloader to choose from.
1677 Using our virtual package system, users are now able to choose between both GRUB and 1685 Using our virtual package system, users are now able to choose between both GRUB and
1678 LILO as their bootloaders. 1686 LILO as their bootloaders.
1679 </p> 1687 </p>
1680 <p> Please keep in mind that having both bootloaders installed is not necessary. 1688 <p> Please keep in mind that having both bootloaders installed is not necessary.
1681 In fact, it can be a hindrance, so please only choose one. 1689 In fact, it can be a hindrance, so please only choose one.
1682 </p> 1690 </p>
1683 <impo>If you are installing Gentoo Linux on a system with an NVIDIA nForce or nForce2 chipset 1691 <impo>If you are installing Gentoo Linux on a system with an NVIDIA nForce or nForce2 chipset
1684 with an integrated GeForce graphics card, you should use LILO and avoid GRUB. With on-board 1692 with an integrated GeForce graphics card, you should use LILO and avoid GRUB. With on-board
1685 video enabled, the low memory area of your RAM may be used as video RAM. Since GRUB also uses low 1693 video enabled, the low memory area of your RAM may be used as video RAM. Since GRUB also uses low
1686 memory at boot time, it may experience an "out of memory" condition. So, if you have an nForce 1694 memory at boot time, it may experience an "out of memory" condition. So, if you have an nForce
1687 or potentially other board with on-board video, use LILO. Even if you're using off-board video 1695 or potentially other board with on-board video, use LILO. Even if you're using off-board video
1688 right now, it would be nice to be able to remove the graphics card and use the on-board video in a 1696 right now, it would be nice to be able to remove the graphics card and use the on-board video in a
1689 pinch, wouldn't it? :)</impo> 1697 pinch, wouldn't it? :)</impo>
1690 1698 <p>
1699 People who have selected framebuffer in their kernel should add <c>vga=xxx</c> to their bootloader configuration file as a kernel parameter. <c>xxx</c> is one of the values in the following table:
1700 </p>
1701<table>
1702<tr><ti></ti><th>640x480</th><th>800x600</th><th>1024x768</th><th>1280x1024</th></tr>
1703<tr><th>8 bpp</th><ti>769</ti><ti>771</ti><ti>773</ti><ti>775</ti></tr>
1704<tr><th>16 bpp</th><ti>785</ti><ti>788</ti><ti>791</ti><ti>794</ti></tr>
1705<tr><th>32 bpp</th><ti>786</ti><ti>789</ti><ti>892</ti><ti>795</ti></tr>
1706</table>
1691 </body> 1707 </body>
1692 </section> 1708 </section>
1693 <section> 1709 <section>
1694 <title>Configuring GRUB</title> 1710 <title>Configuring GRUB</title>
1695 <body> 1711 <body>
1696 <p>The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how GRUB 1712 <p>The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how GRUB
1697 refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition <path>/dev/hda1</path> is called 1713 refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition <path>/dev/hda1</path> is called
1698 <path>(hd0,0)</path> under GRUB. Notice the parenthesis around the hd0,0 - they are required. 1714 <path>(hd0,0)</path> under GRUB. Notice the parenthesis around the hd0,0 - they are required.
1699 Hard drives count from zero rather than &quot;a&quot;, and partitions start at zero rather than one. 1715 Hard drives count from zero rather than &quot;a&quot;, and partitions start at zero rather than one.
1700 Be aware too that with the hd devices, only harddrives are counted, not atapi-ide devices such as 1716 Be aware too that with the hd devices, only harddrives are counted, not atapi-ide devices such as
1701 cdrom players, burners, and that the same construct can be used with scsi drives. 1717 cdrom players, burners, and that the same construct can be used with scsi drives.
1702 (Normally they get higher numbers than ide drives except when the bios is configured 1718 (Normally they get higher numbers than ide drives except when the bios is configured
1703 to boot from scsi devices.) Assuming you have a harddrive on /dev/hda, a cdrom player on /dev/hdb, 1719 to boot from scsi devices.) Assuming you have a harddrive on /dev/hda, a cdrom player on /dev/hdb,
1704 a burner on /dev/hdc, a second hard drive on /dev/hdd and no scsi harddrive, 1720 a burner on /dev/hdc, a second hard drive on /dev/hdd and no scsi harddrive,
1705 <path>/dev/hdd7</path> gets translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>. 1721 <path>/dev/hdd7</path> gets translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>.

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