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48 </author> 48 </author>
49 <author title="Reviewer"> 49 <author title="Reviewer">
50 <mail link="gerrynjr@gentoo.org">Gerald J. Normandin Jr.</mail> 50 <mail link="gerrynjr@gentoo.org">Gerald J. Normandin Jr.</mail>
51 </author> 51 </author>
52 <author title="Reviewer"> 52 <author title="Reviewer">
53 <mail link="spyderous@gentoo.org">Donnie Berkholz</mail> 53 <mail link="spyderous@gentoo.org">Donnie Berkholz</mail>
54 </author> 54 </author>
55 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 55 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
56 Linux 1.4, release version (not _rc versions.) The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 56 Linux 1.4, release version (not _rc versions.) The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
57 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 57 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
58 scratch. 58 scratch.
59 </abstract> 59 </abstract>
60 60
61 <license/> 61 <license/>
62 62
63<version>2.6.3</version> 63<version>2.6.4</version>
64 <date>5th of August 2003</date> 64 <date>6th of August 2003</date>
65 <chapter> 65 <chapter>
66 <title>About the Install</title> 66 <title>About the Install</title>
67 <section> 67 <section>
68 <body> 68 <body>
69 <p>First, if you are new to this, welcome to Gentoo Linux! Gentoo 69 <p>First, if you are new to this, welcome to Gentoo Linux! Gentoo
70 Linux can be installed in many different ways. Those who are looking 70 Linux can be installed in many different ways. Those who are looking
71 for a rapid install can use pre-built packages, while those who want 71 for a rapid install can use pre-built packages, while those who want
72 the ultimate in customizability can compile Gentoo Linux entirely 72 the ultimate in customizability can compile Gentoo Linux entirely
73 from the original source code. The method you choose is up to 73 from the original source code. The method you choose is up to
74 you.</p> 74 you.</p>
75 75
76 <p>One significant change in relation to the official 1.4 release is 76 <p>One significant change in relation to the official 1.4 release is
77 our new 2-CD installation set, which can be ordered from <uri 77 our new 2-CD installation set, which can be ordered from <uri
78 link="http://store.gentoo.org">The Gentoo Linux Store</uri>, in 78 link="http://store.gentoo.org">The Gentoo Linux Store</uri>, in
79 addition to being available on our mirrors. We currently have 2-CD 79 addition to being available on our mirrors. We currently have 2-CD
140 you want to compile yourself. The stage1 tarball is used when you 140 you want to compile yourself. The stage1 tarball is used when you
141 want to bootstrap and build the entire system from scratch. The 141 want to bootstrap and build the entire system from scratch. The
142 stage2 tarball is used for building the entire system from a 142 stage2 tarball is used for building the entire system from a
143 bootstrapped "semi-compiled" state. The stage3 tarball already 143 bootstrapped "semi-compiled" state. The stage3 tarball already
144 contains a basic Gentoo Linux system that has been built for 144 contains a basic Gentoo Linux system that has been built for
145 you. If you are interested in doing a "GRP" install, then the 145 you. If you are interested in doing a "GRP" install, then the
146 stage3 tarball should be used.</p> 146 stage3 tarball should be used.</p>
147 147
148 <p><b>If you're not doing a GRP install, should you start from a stage1, stage2, or 148 <p><b>If you're not doing a GRP install, should you start from a stage1, stage2, or
149 stage3 tarball?</b> Here is some information that should help you 149 stage3 tarball?</b> Here is some information that should help you
150 make this decision. 150 make this decision.
151 Starting from a stage1 allows you to have total 151 Starting from a stage1 allows you to have total
152 control over the optimization settings and optional build-time 152 control over the optimization settings and optional build-time
153 functionality that is initially enabled on your system. This makes 153 functionality that is initially enabled on your system. This makes
154 stage1 installs good for power users who know what they are doing. 154 stage1 installs good for power users who know what they are doing.
155 It is also a great installation method for those who would like to 155 It is also a great installation method for those who want to more
156 know more about the inner workings of Gentoo Linux.</p> 156 about the inner workings of Gentoo Linux.</p>
157 157
158 <p> 158 <p>
159 Stage2 installs allow you to skip the bootstrap process, and doing 159 Stage2 installs allow you to skip the bootstrap process, and doing
160 this is fine if you are happy with the optimization settings that we 160 this is fine if you are happy with the optimization settings that we
161 chose for your particular stage2 tarball. And choosing to go with a 161 chose for your particular stage2 tarball. And choosing to go with a
162 stage3 allows for the fastest install of Gentoo Linux, but also 162 stage3 allows for the fastest install of Gentoo Linux, but also
163 means that your base system will have the optimization settings that 163 means that your base system will have the optimization settings that
164 we chose for you (which to be honest, are good settings and were 164 we chose for you (which to be honest, are good settings and were
165 carefully chosen to enhance performance while maintaining 165 carefully chosen to enhance performance while maintaining
166 stability.) Since major releases of Gentoo Linux have stage3's 166 stability.) Since major releases of Gentoo Linux have stage3's
167 specifically optimized for various popular processors, starting 167 specifically optimized for various popular processors, starting
168 from a stage3 can offer the best of all worlds -- a fast install 168 from a stage3 can offer the best of all worlds -- a fast install
169 and a system that is well-optimized. 169 and a system that is well-optimized.
170 <b>If you're installing Gentoo Linux for the 170 <b>If you're installing Gentoo Linux for the
171 first time, consider using a stage3 tarball for 171 first time, consider using a stage3 tarball for
323 <ti>disables loading of evms modules</ti></tr> 323 <ti>disables loading of evms modules</ti></tr>
324 324
325 <tr><ti>nousb</ti> 325 <tr><ti>nousb</ti>
326 <ti>disables usb module load from initrd, disables hotplug</ti></tr> 326 <ti>disables usb module load from initrd, disables hotplug</ti></tr>
327 327
328 <tr><ti>ide=nodma</ti> 328 <tr><ti>ide=nodma</ti>
329 <ti>Force disabling of dma for malfunctioning ide devices</ti></tr> 329 <ti>Force disabling of dma for malfunctioning ide devices</ti></tr>
330 330
331 <tr><ti>cdcache</ti> 331 <tr><ti>cdcache</ti>
332 <ti>Cache the entire runtime portion of cd in ram, This uses 40mb of RAM , but allows you to umount /mnt/cdrom and mount another cdrom.</ti></tr> 332 <ti>Cache the entire runtime portion of cd in ram, This uses 40mb of RAM , but allows you to umount /mnt/cdrom and mount another cdrom.</ti></tr>
333 333
334 </table></p> 334 </table></p>
335 335
336 336
337 <p>Once you hit Enter, you will be greeted with an even fancier boot 337 <p>Once you hit Enter, you will be greeted with an even fancier boot
338 screen and progress bar.</p> 338 screen and progress bar:</p>
339
340<!-- can't find the pics
341 339
342 <figure link="/images/install/livecd-1.4-boot.png" caption="The Gentoo 340 <figure link="/images/install/livecd-1.4-boot.png" caption="The Gentoo
343 Linux Live CD booting" /> 341 Linux Live CD booting" />
344--> 342
345 343
346 <p>Once the boot process completes, you will be automatically logged in 344 <p>Once the boot process completes, you will be automatically logged in
347 to the "Live" Gentoo Linux as 345 to the "Live" Gentoo Linux as
348&quot;<c>root</c>&quot;, the "super user." You should have a root (&quot;<c>#</c>&quot;) prompt 346&quot;<c>root</c>&quot;, the "super user." You should have a root (&quot;<c>#</c>&quot;) prompt
349on the current console, and can also switch to other consoles by pressing 347on the current console, and can also switch to other consoles by pressing
350Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you started on by pressing 348Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you started on by pressing
351Alt-F1.</p> 349Alt-F1. The console will look like this:</p>
352
353<!-- can't find the pics
354 350
355 <figure link="/images/install/livecd-1.4-con.png" caption="The Gentoo 351 <figure link="/images/install/livecd-1.4-con.png" caption="The Gentoo
356 Linux Live CD console" /> 352 Linux Live CD console" />
357
358-->
359 353
360<note><b>Advanced users:</b> When the Live CD boots, the Live CD root password is 354<note><b>Advanced users:</b> When the Live CD boots, the Live CD root password is
361set to a random string for security purposes. If you plan to start 355set to a random string for security purposes. If you plan to start
362<c>sshd</c> to allow remote logins to your Live CD, you should set the Live 356<c>sshd</c> to allow remote logins to your Live CD, you should set the Live
363CD root password now by typing <c>passwd</c> and following the prompts. 357CD root password now by typing <c>passwd</c> and following the prompts.
364Otherwise, you will not know the proper password for logging into the Live 358Otherwise, you will not know the proper password for logging into the Live
365CD over the network. </note> 359CD over the network. </note>
366 360
367 <p>You've probably also noticed that above your <c>#</c> prompt is a bunch of help text 361 <p>You've probably also noticed that above your <c>#</c> prompt is a bunch of help text
368 that explains how to do things like configure your Linux networking and telling you where you can find 362 that explains how to do things like configure your Linux networking and telling you where you can find
369 the Gentoo Linux stage tarballs and packages on your CD. 363 the Gentoo Linux stage tarballs and packages on your CD.
370 </p> 364 </p>
371 </body> 365 </body>
372 </section> 366 </section>
373 </chapter> 367 </chapter>
1184<p><b>GRP Users</b>: There is a Portage snapshot on the Live CD. You will 1178<p><b>GRP Users</b>: There is a Portage snapshot on the Live CD. You will
1185need to use this snapshot so that you can skip the <c>emerge sync</c> step 1179need to use this snapshot so that you can skip the <c>emerge sync</c> step
1186later in this document, since <c>emerge sync</c> requires a network 1180later in this document, since <c>emerge sync</c> requires a network
1187connection. Untar this snapshot as follows:</p> 1181connection. Untar this snapshot as follows:</p>
1188<pre caption="Using Portage snapshot"> 1182<pre caption="Using Portage snapshot">
1189<comment>Replace yyyymmdd with the datestamp in the filename.</comment> 1183<comment>Replace yyyymmdd with the datestamp in the filename.</comment>
1190# <c>tar -xvjf /mnt/cdrom/snapshots/portage-yyyymmdd.tar.bz2 -C /mnt/gentoo/usr</c> 1184# <c>tar -xvjf /mnt/cdrom/snapshots/portage-yyyymmdd.tar.bz2 -C /mnt/gentoo/usr</c>
1191</pre> 1185</pre>
1192<p>This will extract a snapshot of the Portage tree to your fresh Gentoo 1186<p>This will extract a snapshot of the Portage tree to your fresh Gentoo
1193install. Now you won't need to connect to the Internet and use <c>emerge 1187install. Now you won't need to connect to the Internet and use <c>emerge
1194sync</c> to download a Portage tree. Now, copy distfiles and packages 1188sync</c> to download a Portage tree. Now, copy distfiles and packages
1195from the Live CD into place:</p> 1189from the Live CD into place:</p>
1196 1190
1197<pre caption="Copying GRP files"> 1191<pre caption="Copying GRP files">
1198# <c>cp -R /mnt/cdrom/distfiles /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage/distfiles</c> 1192# <c>cp -R /mnt/cdrom/distfiles /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage/distfiles</c>
1199# <c>cp -a /mnt/cdrom/packages /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage/packages/</c> 1193# <c>cp -a /mnt/cdrom/packages/ /mnt/gentoo/usr/portage/packages/</c>
1200</pre> 1194</pre>
1201 1195
1202<p>All relevant files are now in place for using GRP. You should now have 1196<p>All relevant files are now in place for using GRP. You should now have
1203everything copied over and unpacked that you'll need to install Gentoo Linux 1197everything copied over and unpacked that you'll need to install Gentoo Linux
1204-- even without a network connection.</p> 1198-- even without a network connection.</p>
1205 1199
1206</body> 1200</body>
1207</section> 1201</section>
1208<section> 1202<section>
1209<title>Entering the chroot</title> 1203<title>Entering the chroot</title>
1210<body> 1204<body>
1211<p> 1205<p>
1212Next, we will <c>chroot</c> over to the new Gentoo Linux build installation to &quot;enter&quot; the new 1206Next, we will <c>chroot</c> over to the new Gentoo Linux build installation to &quot;enter&quot; the new
1213Gentoo Linux system. 1207Gentoo Linux system.
1214</p> 1208</p>
1451 <chapter> 1445 <chapter>
1452 <title>Setting your time zone</title> 1446 <title>Setting your time zone</title>
1453 <section> 1447 <section>
1454 <body> 1448 <body>
1455 <p>Now you need to set your time zone.</p> 1449 <p>Now you need to set your time zone.</p>
1456 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time) 1450 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time)
1457 in <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link to 1451 in <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link to
1458 /etc/localtime by typing:</p> 1452 /etc/localtime by typing:</p>
1459<pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for time zone"> 1453<pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for time zone">
1460# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c> 1454# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c>
1461</pre> 1455</pre>
1462 </body> 1456 </body>
1463 </section> 1457 </section>
1464 </chapter> 1458 </chapter>
1465 <chapter> 1459 <chapter>
1460 <title>Modifying /etc/fstab for your machine</title>
1461 <section>
1462 <body>
1463 <impo>
1464 To edit files, remember to use <c>nano -w "filename"</c>.
1465 </impo>
1466 <p>Your Gentoo Linux system is almost ready for use. All we need to do now is configure
1467 a few important system files and install the boot loader.
1468 The first file we need to
1469 configure is <path>/etc/fstab</path>. Remember that you should use
1470 the <c>notail</c> option for your boot partition if you chose to create a ReiserFS filesystem on it.
1471 Remember to specify <c>ext2</c>, <c>ext3</c> or <c>reiserfs</c> filesystem types as appropriate.
1472 </p>
1473 <p>Use something like the <path>/etc/fstab</path> listed below, but of course be sure to replace &quot;BOOT&quot;,
1474 &quot;ROOT&quot; and &quot;SWAP&quot; with the actual block devices you are using (such as <c>hda1</c>, etc.)</p>
1475<pre caption="Editing fstab">
1476<comment># /etc/fstab: static file system information.
1477#
1478# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't
1479# needed; notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage
1480# efficiency). It is safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to
1481# switch between notail and tail freely.
1482
1483# &lt;fs&gt; &lt;mount point&gt; &lt;type&gt; &lt;opts&gt; &lt;dump/pass&gt;
1484
1485# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts.
1486</comment>
1487/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2
1488/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1
1489/dev/SWAP none swap sw 0 0
1490/dev/cdroms/cdrom0 /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,ro 0 0
1491proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
1492</pre>
1493 <warn>Please notice that <i>/boot</i> is NOT mounted at boot time.
1494 This is to protect the data in <i>/boot</i> from
1495 corruption. If you need to access <i>/boot</i>, please mount it!
1496 </warn>
1497 </body>
1498 </section>
1499 </chapter>
1500 <chapter>
1466 <title>Installing the kernel and system logger</title> 1501 <title>Installing the kernel and system logger</title>
1467 <section> 1502 <section>
1468 <title>Kernel selections</title> 1503 <title>Kernel selections</title>
1469 <body> 1504 <body>
1470 1505
1471 <p>There are two options for installing a kernel. You can either configure your own kernel or use the <c>genkernel</c> 1506 <p>There are two options for installing a kernel. You can either configure your own kernel or use the <c>genkernel</c>
1472 utility to configure and compile your kernel automatically.</p> 1507 utility to configure and compile your kernel automatically.</p>
1473 1508
1474 1509
1475 <p>Whether configuring a kernel by hand or using <c>genkernel</c>, 1510 <p>Whether configuring a kernel by hand or using <c>genkernel</c>,
1476 you'll need to merge the Linux kernel sources you'd like to use. 1511 you'll need to merge the Linux kernel sources you'd like to use.
1477 Gentoo provides several kernel ebuilds; a list can be found 1512 Gentoo provides several kernel ebuilds; a list can be found
1478 <uri link="/doc/en/gentoo-kernel.xml">here</uri>. If you are uncertain 1513 <uri link="/doc/en/gentoo-kernel.xml">here</uri>. If you are uncertain
1479 which kernel sources to choose, we advise using <c>gentoo-sources</c>. 1514 which kernel sources to choose, we advise using <c>gentoo-sources</c>.
1480 <!--or <c>vanilla-sources</c>.(2.4.21-vanilla has sound issues)--> If you want XFS support, you should choose 1515 <!--or <c>vanilla-sources</c>.(2.4.21-vanilla has sound issues)--> If you want XFS support, you should choose
1520 <p>Now, let's see how to use genkernel. First, emerge the genkernel 1555 <p>Now, let's see how to use genkernel. First, emerge the genkernel
1521 ebuild:</p> 1556 ebuild:</p>
1522 1557
1523<pre caption="Emerging genkernel"> 1558<pre caption="Emerging genkernel">
1524# <c>emerge -k genkernel</c> 1559# <c>emerge -k genkernel</c>
1525</pre> 1560</pre>
1526 1561
1527 <p>Now, compile your kernel sources by running <c>genkernel</c>:</p> 1562 <p>Now, compile your kernel sources by running <c>genkernel</c>:</p>
1528 1563
1529 <note><b>Advanced users:</b> you can type <c>genkernel --config</c> instead, 1564 <note><b>Advanced users:</b> you can type <c>genkernel --config</c> instead,
1530which will cause genkernel to allow you to tweak the default kernel configuration before 1565which will cause genkernel to allow you to tweak the default kernel configuration before
1531building begins.</note> 1566building begins.</note>
1532 1567
1533 1568
1534<pre caption="Running genkernel"> 1569<pre caption="Running genkernel">
1570<comment>If you're using genkernel 1.2 (included in the 1.4 GRP set), use the following:</comment>
1571# <c>genkernel gentoo-sources</c>
1572<comment>If you're using genkernel 1.4, available with an emerge sync, you don't need to specify a kernel:</comment>
1535# <c>genkernel</c> 1573# <c>genkernel</c>
1536Gentoo Linux genkernel, version 1.4 1574Gentoo Linux genkernel, version 1.4
1537 Copyright 2003 Gentoo Technologies, Inc., Bob Johnson, Daniel Robbins 1575 Copyright 2003 Gentoo Technologies, Inc., Bob Johnson, Daniel Robbins
1538 Distributed under the GNU General Public License version 2 1576 Distributed under the GNU General Public License version 2
1539 1577
1540Settings: 1578Settings:
1541 compile optimization: 1 processor(s) 1579 compile optimization: 1 processor(s)
1542 source tree: /usr/src/linux-2.4.20-gaming-r3 1580 source tree: /usr/src/linux-2.4.20-gaming-r3
1543 config: gentoo (customized) 1581 config: gentoo (customized)
1544 config loc: /etc/kernels/config-2.4.20-gaming-r3 1582 config loc: /etc/kernels/config-2.4.20-gaming-r3
1545 initrd config: (default) /etc/kernels/settings 1583 initrd config: (default) /etc/kernels/settings
1546 1584
1547 * Running "make oldconfig"... [ ok ] 1585 * Running "make oldconfig"... [ ok ]
1548 * Logging to /var/log/genkernel.log... [ ok ] 1586 * Logging to /var/log/genkernel.log... [ ok ]
1549 * Starting 2.4.20-gaming-r3 build... [ ok ] 1587 * Starting 2.4.20-gaming-r3 build... [ ok ]
1838# <c>emerge -k sys-apps/lvm-user</c> 1876# <c>emerge -k sys-apps/lvm-user</c>
1839</pre> 1877</pre>
1840 <p>If you're a laptop user and wish to use your PCMCIA slots on your first 1878 <p>If you're a laptop user and wish to use your PCMCIA slots on your first
1841 real reboot, you will want to make sure you install the <i>pcmcia-cs</i> package. 1879 real reboot, you will want to make sure you install the <i>pcmcia-cs</i> package.
1842 </p> 1880 </p>
1843<pre caption="Emerging PCMCIA-cs"> 1881<pre caption="Emerging PCMCIA-cs">
1844# <c>emerge -k sys-apps/pcmcia-cs</c> 1882# <c>emerge -k sys-apps/pcmcia-cs</c>
1845</pre> 1883</pre>
1846 <!-- fix the bug or fix the docs, don't send the user in circles 1884 <!-- fix the bug or fix the docs, don't send the user in circles
1847(drobbins) 1885(drobbins)
1848 <warn>You will have to re-emerge <i>pcmcia-cs</i> after installation to get PCMCIA 1886 <warn>You will have to re-emerge <i>pcmcia-cs</i> after installation to get PCMCIA
1849 to work. 1887 to work.
1850 </warn> 1888 </warn>
1851 --> 1889 -->
1852 </body> 1890 </body>
1853 </section>
1854 </chapter>
1855 <chapter>
1856 <title>Modifying /etc/fstab for your machine</title>
1857 <section>
1858 <body>
1859 <impo>
1860 To edit files, remember to use <c>nano -w "filename"</c>.
1861 </impo>
1862 <p>Your Gentoo Linux system is almost ready for use. All we need to do now is configure
1863 a few important system files and install the boot loader.
1864 The first file we need to
1865 configure is <path>/etc/fstab</path>. Remember that you should use
1866 the <c>notail</c> option for your boot partition if you chose to create a ReiserFS filesystem on it.
1867 Remember to specify <c>ext2</c>, <c>ext3</c> or <c>reiserfs</c> filesystem types as appropriate.
1868 </p>
1869 <p>Use something like the <path>/etc/fstab</path> listed below, but of course be sure to replace &quot;BOOT&quot;,
1870 &quot;ROOT&quot; and &quot;SWAP&quot; with the actual block devices you are using (such as <c>hda1</c>, etc.)</p>
1871<pre caption="Editing fstab">
1872<comment># /etc/fstab: static file system information.
1873#
1874# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't
1875# needed; notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage
1876# efficiency). It is safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to
1877# switch between notail and tail freely.
1878
1879# &lt;fs&gt; &lt;mount point&gt; &lt;type&gt; &lt;opts&gt; &lt;dump/pass&gt;
1880
1881# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts.
1882</comment>
1883/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2
1884/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1
1885/dev/SWAP none swap sw 0 0
1886/dev/cdroms/cdrom0 /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,ro 0 0
1887proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
1888</pre>
1889 <warn>Please notice that <i>/boot</i> is NOT mounted at boot time.
1890 This is to protect the data in <i>/boot</i> from
1891 corruption. If you need to access <i>/boot</i>, please mount it!
1892 </warn>
1893 </body>
1894 </section> 1891 </section>
1895 </chapter> 1892 </chapter>
1896 <chapter> 1893 <chapter>
1897 <title>User Management</title> 1894 <title>User Management</title>
1898 <section> 1895 <section>
1899 <title>Setting a root password</title> 1896 <title>Setting a root password</title>
1900 <body> 1897 <body>
1901 <p>Before you forget, set the root password by typing: </p> 1898 <p>Before you forget, set the root password by typing: </p>
1902<pre caption="Setting the root Password"> 1899<pre caption="Setting the root Password">
1903# <c>passwd</c> 1900# <c>passwd</c>
1904</pre> 1901</pre>
1905 </body> 1902 </body>
1906 </section> 1903 </section>
1907 <section> 1904 <section>
1908 <title>Adding a user for day-to-day use</title> 1905 <title>Adding a user for day-to-day use</title>

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