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18 </author> 18 </author>
19 <author title="Editor"> 19 <author title="Editor">
20 <mail link="Pierre-Henri.Jondot@wanadoo.fr">Pierre-Henri Jondot</mail> 20 <mail link="Pierre-Henri.Jondot@wanadoo.fr">Pierre-Henri Jondot</mail>
21 </author> 21 </author>
22 <author title="Editor"> 22 <author title="Editor">
23 <mail link="stocke2@gentoo.org">Eric Stockbridge</mail> 23 <mail link="stocke2@gentoo.org">Eric Stockbridge</mail>
24 </author> 24 </author>
25 <author title="Editor"> 25 <author title="Editor">
26 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail> 26 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail>
27 </author> 27 </author>
28 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 28 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
29 Linux 1.4_rc1. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 29 Linux 1.4_rc1. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
30 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 30 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
31 scratch. 31 scratch.
32 </abstract> 32 </abstract>
33 <version>2.1</version> 33 <version>2.2</version>
34 <date>7 December 2002</date> 34 <date>16 December 2002</date>
35 <chapter> 35 <chapter>
36 <title>About the Install</title> 36 <title>About the Install</title>
37 <section> 37 <section>
38 <body> 38 <body>
39 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 39 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
40 as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 40 as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
41 Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) 41 Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE)
42 (built-in to the kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as 42 (built-in to the kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as
43 modules). In addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network 43 modules). In addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network
44 card that Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your 44 card that Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your
45 network and establish outbound <c>ssh</c> connections and download files. 45 network and establish outbound <c>ssh</c> connections and download files.
46 </p> 46 </p>
47 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 47 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
48 ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully 48 ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully
49 built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully 49 built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully
50 slow under those conditions.) To begin the install process, first grab the 50 slow under those conditions.) To begin the install process, first grab the
51 livecd ISO images from 51 livecd ISO images from
52 <uri>http://www.ibiblio.org/gentoo/releases/1.4_rc1/</uri>. The three stages make our life 52 <uri>http://www.ibiblio.org/gentoo/releases/1.4_rc1/</uri>. The three stages make our life
53 easy with Gentoo. The stage1 is for building the entire system from scratch. Stage2 is for building 53 easy with Gentoo. The stage1 is for building the entire system from scratch. Stage2 is for building
54 some of the system from scratch, and stage3 saves a lot of time because it is already 54 some of the system from scratch, and stage3 saves a lot of time because it is already
55 optimized for you specific system. At the moment only the stage1 tarball is 55 optimized for you specific system. At the moment only the stage1 tarball is
56 stored on the livecd, but you will be able to download a stage2 or 56 stored on the livecd, but you will be able to download a stage2 or
57 stage3 tarball optimized for your system after booting the livecd. 57 stage3 tarball optimized for your system after booting the livecd.
58 </p> 58 </p>
59 <info>If for some reason your install gets interrupted at some point, you can reboot 59 <info>If for some reason your install gets interrupted at some point, you can reboot
60 and restart. For example, if you have partitioned, installed the stageX tarball, and 60 and restart. For example, if you have partitioned, installed the stageX tarball, and
61 are ready to chroot, you can restart the install if necessary. Just re-boot with the 61 are ready to chroot, you can restart the install if necessary. Just re-boot with the
62 LiveCD, then mount your drives/partitions to <path>/mnt</path> as normal. Basically, you can do 62 LiveCD, then mount your drives/partitions to <path>/mnt</path> as normal. Basically, you can do
63 this at about any point during the install, just not before partitioning for obvious reasons. 63 this at about any point during the install, just not before partitioning for obvious reasons.
64 </info> 64 </info>
65
66
67 <warn>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish 65 <warn>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish
68 to report it as a bug, report it to <uri>bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug needs to be 66 to report it as a bug, report it to <uri>bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug needs to be
69 moved upstream to the package maintainers (ie KDE) the <e>developers</e> will take care 67 moved upstream to the package maintainers (ie KDE) the <e>developers</e> will take care
70 of that. 68 of that.
71 </warn> 69 </warn>
72
73 <p>Now, let's quickly review the install process. We'll create partitions, 70 <p>Now, let's quickly review the install process. We'll create partitions,
74 create our filesystems, and extract either a stage1, stage2 or stage3 tarball. 71 create our filesystems, and extract either a stage1, stage2 or stage3 tarball.
75 If we are using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, we will take the appropriate steps 72 If we are using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, we will take the appropriate steps
76 to get our systems to stage3. Once our systems are at stage3, we can configure 73 to get our systems to stage3. Once our systems are at stage3, we can configure
77 them (tweaking config files, installing a bootloader, etc) and boot them and 74 them (tweaking config files, installing a bootloader, etc) and boot them and
78 have a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system. Depending on what stage of the build 75 have a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system. Depending on what stage of the build
79 process you're starting from, here's what's required for installation: 76 process you're starting from, here's what's required for installation:
80 </p> 77 </p>
81 <table> 78 <table>
82 <tr> 79 <tr>
83 <th>stage tarball</th> 80 <th>stage tarball</th>
84 <th>requirements for installation</th> 81 <th>requirements for installation</th>
85 </tr> 82 </tr>
86 <tr> 83 <tr>
87 <ti>1</ti> 84 <ti>1</ti>
579 </pre> 576 </pre>
580 <note> 577 <note>
581 People who need to substantially tweak the build process should take a look at 578 People who need to substantially tweak the build process should take a look at
582 the <path>/etc/make.globals</path> file. This file comprises gentoo defaults and 579 the <path>/etc/make.globals</path> file. This file comprises gentoo defaults and
583 should never be touched. If the defaults do not suffice, then new values should 580 should never be touched. If the defaults do not suffice, then new values should
584 be put in <path>/etc/make.conf</path>, as entries in <path>make.conf</path> 581 be put in <path>/etc/make.conf</path>, as entries in <path>make.conf</path>
585 <comment>override</comment> the entries in <path>make.globals</path>. If you're 582 <comment>override</comment> the entries in <path>make.globals</path>. If you're
586 interested in tweaking USE settings, look in <path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path>. 583 interested in tweaking USE settings, look in <path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path>.
587 If you want to turn off any USE settings found here, add an appropriate <c>USE=&quot;-foo&quot;</c> 584 If you want to turn off any USE settings found here, add an appropriate <c>USE=&quot;-foo&quot;</c>
588 in /etc/make.conf (to turn off the <c>foo</c> USE setting.) 585 in /etc/make.conf (to turn off the <c>foo</c> USE setting.)
589 </note> 586 </note>
590 </body> 587 </body>
591 </section> 588 </section>
592 </chapter> 589 </chapter>
593 <chapter> 590 <chapter>
594 <title>Progressing from stage1 to stage2</title> 591 <title>Starting from Stage1</title>
595 <section> 592 <section>
596 <body> 593 <body>
597 <p>If you are a stage2 or stage3 tarball, then we've already bootstrapped 594 <p>The stage1 tarball is for ultimate tweakage. If you have picked this tarball,
598 for you. There is no reason for you to bootstrap again, unless you decided to 595 you are most likely looking to have an uber-optimized system. Have fun, because optimization
599 do an <c>emerge sync</c> and want to ensure that you have an up-to-the-minute 596 is what Gentoo Linux is all about!
600 current Gentoo Linux system. Most people using stage2 or stage3 tarballs will
601 <i>not</i> want to bootstrap again, since it can take over two hours even on
602 very fast machines.
603 </p> 597 </p>
604 <p>Now, it's time to start the &quot;bootstrap&quot; process. This process takes about two hours on 598 <p>Now, it's time to start the &quot;bootstrap&quot; process. This process takes about two hours on
605 my 1200Mhz AMD Athlon system. During this time, the extracted build image will be prepped 599 my 1200Mhz AMD Athlon system. During this time, the extracted build image will be prepped
606 for compiling the rest ofthe system. The GNU compiler suite will be built, as well as the GNU C library. 600 for compiling the rest of the system. The GNU compiler suite will be built, as well as the GNU C library.
607 These are time consuming builds and make up the bulk of the bootstrap process. 601 These are time consuming builds and make up the bulk of the bootstrap process.
608 </p> 602 </p>
609 <pre caption="Bootstrapping"> 603 <pre caption="Bootstrapping">
610# <c>cd /usr/portage</c> 604# <c>cd /usr/portage</c>
611# <c>scripts/bootstrap.sh</c> 605# <c>scripts/bootstrap.sh</c>
612 </pre> 606 </pre>
613 <p>The &quot;bootstrap&quot; process will now begin. 607 <p>The &quot;bootstrap&quot; process will now begin.
614 </p> 608 </p>
615 <note> 609 <note>
616 Portage by default uses <c>/var/tmp</c> during package building, often 610 Portage by default uses <c>/var/tmp</c> during package building, often
617 using several hundred megabytes of temporary storage. If you would like to 611 using several hundred megabytes of temporary storage. If you would like to
618 change where Portage stores these temporary files, set a new PORTAGE_TMPDIR <e>before</e> 612 change where Portage stores these temporary files, set a new PORTAGE_TMPDIR <e>before</e>
619 starting the bootstrap process, as follows: 613 starting the bootstrap process, as follows:
620 </note> 614 </note>
621 <pre caption="Changing Portage's Storage Path"> 615 <pre caption="Changing Portage's Storage Path">
622# <c>export PORTAGE_TMPDIR=&quot;/otherdir/tmp&quot;</c> 616# <c>export PORTAGE_TMPDIR=&quot;/otherdir/tmp&quot;</c>
623 </pre> 617 </pre>
624 <p><c>bootstrap.sh</c> will build <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, <c>gettext</c>, 618 <p><c>bootstrap.sh</c> will build <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, <c>gettext</c>,
625 and <c>glibc</c>, rebuilding <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, and <c>gettext</c> 619 and <c>glibc</c>, rebuilding <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, and <c>gettext</c>
626 after <c>glibc</c>. Needless to say, this process takes a while. 620 after <c>glibc</c>. Needless to say, this process takes a while.
627 Have a nice nap. Once this process completes, your system will be in a &quot;stage2&quot; state. 621 Have a nice nap. Once this process completes, your system will be equivalent to a &quot;stage2&quot; system.
628 </p> 622 </p>
629 </body> 623 </body>
630 </section>
631 </chapter>
632 <chapter>
633 <title>Timezone</title>
634 <section> 624 </section>
635 <body> 625 </chapter>
636 <impo>It is extremely important that this step is completed, no matter which stage 626 <chapter>
637 tarball you use. Major clock drift will be experienced if you do not set localtime correctly, 627 <title>Starting from Stage2</title>
638 let alone subtle issues when emerging packages later.
639 </impo>
640 <p>At this point, you should have system that's ready for final configuration.
641 We'll start the configuration process by setting the timezone. By setting the timezone before building
642 the kernel we ensure that users get reasonable <c>uname -a</c> output.
643 </p>
644 <p>Look for your timezone (or GMT if you using Greenwich Mean Time) in
645 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link by typing:
646 </p>
647 <pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for timezome">
648# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c>
649 </pre>
650 <p>You might also want to check <path>/etc/rc.conf</path> to make sure your timezone settings
651 are correct.
652 </p>
653 </body>
654 </section> 628 <section>
655 </chapter>
656 <chapter>
657 <title>Progressing from stage2 to stage3</title>
658 <section>
659 <body> 629 <body>
660 <p>Once your build image has been bootstrapped and you're at stage2 630 <p>The stage2 tarball already has the bootstrapping done for you. All that you have
661 (again, if you are using a stage3 tarball than these steps are not required) 631 to do is install the rest of the system.
662 it's time to build or install the rest of the base
663 system.
664 </p> 632 </p>
665 <note> 633 <note>
666 If you haven't done so, please edit <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to your flavor. 634 If you haven't done so, please edit <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to your flavor.
667 </note> 635 </note>
668 <pre caption="Installing the Rest of the System"> 636 <pre caption="Installing the Rest of the System">
669# <c>export CONFIG_PROTECT=&quot;&quot;</c> 637# <c>export CONFIG_PROTECT=&quot;&quot;</c>
670# <c>emerge -p system</c> 638# <c>emerge -p system</c>
671 <comment>[lists the packages to be installed]</comment> 639 <comment>[lists the packages to be installed]</comment>
672# <c>emerge system</c> 640# <c>emerge system</c>
673 </pre> 641 </pre>
674 <note>The <c>export CONFIG_PROTECT=&quot;&quot;</c> line ensures that any new scripts 642 <note>The <c>export CONFIG_PROTECT=&quot;&quot;</c> line ensures that any new scripts
675 installed to <path>/etc</path> will overwrite the old scripts (stored in 643 installed to <path>/etc</path> will overwrite the old scripts (stored in
676 <path>sys-apps/baselayout</path>), bypassing Portage's new config file 644 <path>sys-apps/baselayout</path>), bypassing Portage's new config file
677 management support. Type <c>emerge --help config</c> for more details.</note> 645 management support. Type <c>emerge --help config</c> for more details.</note>
678 <p>It's going to take a while 646 <p>It's going to take a while
679 to finish building the entire base system. Your reward is that it will be 647 to finish building the entire base system. Your reward is that it will be
680 thoroughly optimized for your system. The drawback is that you have to find a 648 thoroughly optimized for your system. The drawback is that you have to find a
681 way to keep yourself occupied for some time to come. The author suggests &quot;Star 649 way to keep yourself occupied for some time to come. The author suggests &quot;Star
682 Wars - Super Bombad Racing&quot; for the PS2. When <c>emerge system</c> completes, 650 Wars - Super Bombad Racing&quot; for the PS2. When this process completes, your system
683 you'll have a stage3 Gentoo Linux system. 651 will be the equivalent of a stage3 system.
652 </p>
653 </body>
654 </section>
655 </chapter>
656 <chapter>
657 <title>Starting from Stage3</title>
658 <section>
659 <body>
660 <p>The stage3 tarball is already configured for your system. There is not much to do for this stage,
661 but it is a very good idea to update your system to the newest available packages. </p>
662 <note>If you have not already edited <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to fit your specifications,
663 now would be a good time to do so. </note>
664 <pre caption="Getting up-to-date">
665 # <c>emerge sync</c>
666 # <c>emerge -up world</c>
667 <comment>lists [<i>packages</i>] to be installed</comment>
668 # <c>emerge -u world</c>
669 </pre>
670 </body>
671 </section>
672 </chapter>
673 <chapter>
674 <title>Final Steps: Timezone</title>
675 <section>
676 <body>
677 <p>At this point, you should have system that's ready for final configuration.
678 We'll start the configuration process by setting the timezone. By setting the timezone before building
679 the kernel we ensure that users get reasonable <c>uname -a</c> output.
680 </p>
681 <p>Look for your timezone (or GMT if you using Greenwich Mean Time) in
682 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link by typing:
683 </p>
684 <pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for timezome">
685# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c>
686 </pre>
687 <p>You might also want to check <path>/etc/rc.conf</path> to make sure your timezone settings
688 are correct.
684 </p> 689 </p>
685 </body> 690 </body>
686 </section> 691 </section>
687 </chapter> 692 </chapter>
688 <chapter> 693 <chapter>
689 <title>Final steps: kernel and system logger</title> 694 <title>Final steps: kernel and system logger</title>
690 <section> 695 <section>
691 <body> 696 <body>
692 <note> 697 <note>
693 If you haven't done so, please edit <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to your flavor. 698 If you haven't done so, please edit <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to your flavor.
694 </note> 699 </note>
695 <p>You now need to merge Linux source ebuilds. Here are the ones we currently 700 <p>You now need to merge Linux source ebuilds. Here are the ones we currently
696 offer: 701 offer:
697 </p> 702 </p>
698 <table> 703 <table>
1263# <c>cp /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/stage2 /mnt/floppy/boot/grub/</c> 1268# <c>cp /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/stage2 /mnt/floppy/boot/grub/</c>
1264 1269
1265# <c>grub</c> 1270# <c>grub</c>
1266 1271
1267grub&gt; <c>root (fd0)</c> 1272grub&gt; <c>root (fd0)</c>
1268grub&gt; <c>setup (fd0)</c> 1273grub&gt; <c>setup (fd0)</c>
1269grub&gt; <c>quit</c> 1274grub&gt; <c>quit</c>
1270 </pre> 1275 </pre>
1271 </body> 1276 </body>
1272 </section> 1277 </section>
1273 <section> 1278 <section>
1274 <title>LILO Bootdisks</title> 1279 <title>LILO Bootdisks</title>
1275 <body> 1280 <body>
1276 <p>If you are using LILO, it is also a good idea to make a bootdisk: 1281 <p>If you are using LILO, it is also a good idea to make a bootdisk:
1277 </p> 1282 </p>
1278 <p>To be added</p> 1283 <pre caption="Making a LILO Bootdisk">
1284# <c>dd if=/boot/your_kernel of=/dev/fd0 </c>
1285<comment>This will only work if your kernel is smaller than 1.4MB</comment>
1286 </pre>
1279 </body> 1287 </body>
1280 </section> 1288 </section>
1281 </chapter> 1289 </chapter>
1282 <chapter> 1290 <chapter>
1283 <title>Installation Complete!</title> 1291 <title>Installation Complete!</title>
1284 <section> 1292 <section>
1285 <body> 1293 <body>
1286 <p>Now, Gentoo Linux is installed. The only remaining step is to exit the chrooted shell, 1294 <p>Now, Gentoo Linux is installed. The only remaining step is to exit the chrooted shell,
1287 udpate necessary configuration files, 1295 udpate necessary configuration files,
1288 safely unmount your partitions 1296 safely unmount your partitions
1289 and reboot the system: 1297 and reboot the system:
1290 </p> 1298 </p>
1291 <pre caption="Rebooting the System"> 1299 <pre caption="Rebooting the System">
1292# <c>etc-update</c> 1300# <c>etc-update</c>
1293# <c>exit</c> 1301# <c>exit</c>

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