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17 </author> 17 </author>
18 <author title="Editor"> 18 <author title="Editor">
19 <mail link="Pierre-Henri.Jondot@wanadoo.fr">Pierre-Henri Jondot</mail> 19 <mail link="Pierre-Henri.Jondot@wanadoo.fr">Pierre-Henri Jondot</mail>
20 </author> 20 </author>
21 <author title="Editor"> 21 <author title="Editor">
22 <mail link="stocke2@gentoo.org">Eric Stockbridge</mail> 22 <mail link="stocke2@gentoo.org">Eric Stockbridge</mail>
23 </author> 23 </author>
24 <author title="Editor"> 24 <author title="Editor">
25 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail> 25 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail>
26 </author> 26 </author>
27 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 27 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
28 Linux 1.4_rc2. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 28 Linux 1.4_rc2. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
29 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 29 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
30 scratch. 30 scratch.
31 </abstract> 31 </abstract>
32 <version>2.3.3</version> 32 <version>2.3.4</version>
33 <date>2 January 2003</date> 33 <date>4 January 2003</date>
34 <chapter> 34 <chapter>
35 <title>About the Install</title> 35 <title>About the Install</title>
36 <section> 36 <section>
37 <body> 37 <body>
38 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 38 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
39as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 39as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
40Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the 40Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the
41kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In 41kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In
42addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that 42addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that
43Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and 43Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and
44establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and download 44establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and download
45files. </p> 45files. </p>
46 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 46 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
47ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully 47ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully
48built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully 48built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully
49slow under those conditions.)</p> 49slow under those conditions.)</p>
50 <p>Gentoo Linux can be installed using one of three &quot;stage&quot; tarball files. The 50 <p>Gentoo Linux can be installed using one of three &quot;stage&quot; tarball files. The
51one you choose depends on how much of the system you want to compile yourself. 51one you choose depends on how much of the system you want to compile yourself.
52The stage1 tarball is used when one wants to bootstrap and build the entire 52The stage1 tarball is used when one wants to bootstrap and build the entire
53system from scratch. The stage2 tarball is used for building the entire system 53system from scratch. The stage2 tarball is used for building the entire system
54from scratch, except for the bootstrap part which is already performed for you. 54from scratch, except for the bootstrap part which is already performed for you.
55And the stage3 tarball already contains a basic Gentoo Linux system that has 55And the stage3 tarball already contains a basic Gentoo Linux system that has
56been optimized for your system.</p> 56been optimized for your system.</p>
57 <p> So, how does one beging the install process? First, you'll want to decide 57 <p> So, how does one begin the install process? First, you'll want to decide
58which one of our LiveCD ISO images to grab from 58which one of our LiveCD ISO images to grab from
59<uri>http://www.ibiblio.org/gentoo/releases/1.4_rc2/x86/</uri>. 59<uri>http://www.ibiblio.org/gentoo/releases/1.4_rc2/x86/</uri>.
60In this directory, you'll see several subdirectories such as <c>athlon</c> 60In this directory, you'll see several subdirectories such as <c>athlon</c>
61for each of our various architecture-specific builds. Here's a low-down on 61for each of our various architecture-specific builds. Here's a low-down on
62each arch directory and what it contains:</p> 62each arch directory and what it contains:</p>
63 <table> 63 <table>
64 <tr> 64 <tr>
65 <th>Architecture</th> 65 <th>Architecture</th>
66 <th>Description</th> 66 <th>Description</th>
67 </tr> 67 </tr>
68 <tr> 68 <tr>
69 <ti>x86</ti> 69 <ti>x86</ti>
70 <ti>Stage 1 tarballs and &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; liveCD -- will work on anything.</ti> 70 <ti>Stage 1 tarballs and &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; liveCD -- will work on anything.</ti>
71 </tr> 71 </tr>
72 <tr> 72 <tr>
193 during the initial boot autodetection process, you'll need to load the appropriate 193 during the initial boot autodetection process, you'll need to load the appropriate
194 modules from /lib/modules, again using <c>modprobe</c>: 194 modules from /lib/modules, again using <c>modprobe</c>:
195 </p> 195 </p>
196 <pre caption="Loading SCSI Modules"> 196 <pre caption="Loading SCSI Modules">
197# <c>modprobe aic7xxx</c> 197# <c>modprobe aic7xxx</c>
198# <c>modprobe sd_mod</c> 198# <c>modprobe sd_mod</c>
199 </pre> 199 </pre>
200 <p><c>aic7xxx</c> supports your SCSI controller and <c>sd_mod</c> supports SCSI hard disks. 200 <p><c>aic7xxx</c> supports your SCSI controller and <c>sd_mod</c> supports SCSI hard disks.
201 <note> 201 <note>
202 Support for a SCSI CD-ROMs and disks are built-in in the kernel. 202 Support for a SCSI CD-ROMs and disks are built-in in the kernel.
203 </note></p> 203 </note></p>
204 <p>If you are using hardware RAID, you'll need to load the 204 <p>If you are using hardware RAID, you'll need to load the
205 ATA-RAID modules for your RAID controller. 205 ATA-RAID modules for your RAID controller.
206 </p> 206 </p>
207 <pre caption="Loading RAID Modules"> 207 <pre caption="Loading RAID Modules">
208# <c>insmod ataraid</c> 208# <c>modprobe ataraid</c>
209# <c>insmod pdcraid</c> 209# <c>modprobe pdcraid</c>
210 <comment>(Promise Raid Controller)</comment> 210 <comment>(Promise Raid Controller)</comment>
211# <c>insmod hptraid</c> 211# <c>modprobe hptraid</c>
212 <comment>(Highpoint Raid Controller)</comment> 212 <comment>(Highpoint Raid Controller)</comment>
213 </pre> 213 </pre>
214 <p>The Gentoo LiveCD should have enabled DMA on your disks, but if it did not, 214 <p>The Gentoo LiveCD should have enabled DMA on your disks, but if it did not,
215 <c>hdparm</c> can be used to set DMA on your drives. </p> 215 <c>hdparm</c> can be used to set DMA on your drives. </p>
216 <pre caption="Setting DMA"><comment>Replace hdX with your disk device.</comment> 216 <pre caption="Setting DMA"><comment>Replace hdX with your disk device.</comment>
217# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA </comment> 217# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA </comment>
218# hdparm -d1 -A1 -m16 -u1 -a64 <comment>Enables DMA and other safe performance-enhancing options</comment> 218# hdparm -d1 -A1 -m16 -u1 -a64 <comment>Enables DMA and other safe performance-enhancing options</comment>
219# hdparm -X66 /dev/hdX <comment>Force-enables Ultra-DMA -- dangerous -- may cause some drives to mess up</comment></pre> 219# hdparm -X66 /dev/hdX <comment>Force-enables Ultra-DMA -- dangerous -- may cause some drives to mess up</comment></pre>
220 </body> 220 </body>
221 </section> 221 </section>
222 </chapter> 222 </chapter>
223 <chapter> 223 <chapter>
224 <title>Loading PCMCIA Kernel Modules</title> 224 <title>Loading PCMCIA Kernel Modules</title>
225 <section> 225 <section>
226 <body> 226 <body>
227 <p>If you have a PCMCIA network card, you will need to do some additional 227 <p>If you have a PCMCIA network card, you will need to do some additional
228 trickery. 228 trickery.
229 </p> 229 </p>
230 <warn>To avoid problems with <c>cardmgr</c>, you <e>must</e> run it <e>before</e> you enter the chroot 230 <warn>To avoid problems with <c>cardmgr</c>, you <e>must</e> run it <e>before</e> you enter the chroot
231 portion of the install. </warn> 231 portion of the install. </warn>
232 <pre caption="Loading PCMCIA Modules"> 232 <pre caption="Loading PCMCIA Modules">
233# <i>insmod pcmcia_core</i> 233# <i>modprobe pcmcia_core</i>
234# <i>insmod i82365</i> 234# <i>modprobe i82365</i>
235# <i>insmod ds</i> 235# <i>modprobe ds</i>
236# <i>cardmgr -f</i> 236# <i>cardmgr -f</i>
237 </pre> 237 </pre>
238 <p>As <c>cardmgr</c> detects which hardware is present, your speaker should emit a 238 <p>As <c>cardmgr</c> detects which hardware is present, your speaker should emit a
239 few reassuring beeps, and your PCMCIA network card should hum to life. You can 239 few reassuring beeps, and your PCMCIA network card should hum to life. You can
240 of course insert the PCMCIA card after loading <c>cardmgr</c> too, if that's 240 of course insert the PCMCIA card after loading <c>cardmgr</c> too, if that's
241 preferable. (Technically, you need not run 241 preferable. (Technically, you need not run
242 <c>cardmgr</c> if you know exactly which module your PCMCIA card requires. 242 <c>cardmgr</c> if you know exactly which module your PCMCIA card requires.
243 But if you don't, loading all PCMCIA modules and see which sticks won't work, 243 But if you don't, loading all PCMCIA modules and see which sticks won't work,
244 as all PCMCIA modules load obligingly and hang around for a PCMCIA card to 244 as all PCMCIA modules load obligingly and hang around for a PCMCIA card to
245 drop by. <c>cardmgr</c> will also unload the module(s) for any card when you 245 drop by. <c>cardmgr</c> will also unload the module(s) for any card when you
246 remove it). </p> 246 remove it). </p>
247 </body> 247 </body>
248 </section> 248 </section>
249 </chapter> 249 </chapter>
250 <chapter> 250 <chapter>
320nameserver 10.0.0.1 320nameserver 10.0.0.1
321nameserver 10.0.0.2 321nameserver 10.0.0.2
322 </pre> 322 </pre>
323 <p>Replace <c>10.0.0.1</c> and <c>10.0.0.2</c> with the IP addresses of your 323 <p>Replace <c>10.0.0.1</c> and <c>10.0.0.2</c> with the IP addresses of your
324 primary and secondary DNS servers respectively.</p> 324 primary and secondary DNS servers respectively.</p>
325 </body> 325 </body>
326 </section> 326 </section>
327 <section> 327 <section>
328 <title>Proxy Configuration</title> 328 <title>Proxy Configuration</title>
329 <body> 329 <body>
330 <p>If you are behind a proxy, it is necessary to configure your proxy before 330 <p>If you are behind a proxy, it is necessary to configure your proxy before
331 you continue. We will export some variables to set up the proxy accordingly. 331 you continue. We will export some variables to set up the proxy accordingly.
332 </p> 332 </p>
333 <pre caption="Setting a Proxy"> 333 <pre caption="Setting a Proxy">
334# <c>export http_proxy=&quot;machine.company.com:1234&quot; </c> 334# <c>export http_proxy=&quot;machine.company.com:1234&quot; </c>
335# <c>export ftp_proxy=&quot;$http_proxy&quot; </c> 335# <c>export ftp_proxy=&quot;$HTTP_PROXY&quot; </c>
336# <c>export RSYNC_PROXY=&quot;$http_proxy&quot; </c> 336# <c>export RSYNC_PROXY=&quot;$HTTP_PROXY&quot; </c>
337 </pre> 337 </pre>
338 </body> 338 </body>
339 </section> 339 </section>
340 <section> 340 <section>
341 <title>Network Testing</title> 341 <title>Network Testing</title>
342 <body> 342 <body>
343 <p>Now that your network has been configured, the <c>/sbin/ifconfig -a</c> command should show 343 <p>Now that your network has been configured, the <c>/sbin/ifconfig -a</c> command should show
344 that your network card is working (look for <e>UP</e> and <e>RUNNING</e> in the output). </p> 344 that your network card is working (look for <e>UP</e> and <e>RUNNING</e> in the output). </p>
345 <pre caption="/sbin/ifconfig for a working network card"> 345 <pre caption="/sbin/ifconfig for a working network card">
346eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:50:BA:8F:61:7A 346eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:50:BA:8F:61:7A
347 inet addr:192.168.0.2 Bcast:192.168.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 347 inet addr:192.168.0.2 Bcast:192.168.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
348 inet6 addr: fe80::50:ba8f:617a/10 Scope:Link 348 inet6 addr: fe80::50:ba8f:617a/10 Scope:Link
349 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 349 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
350 RX packets:1498792 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 350 RX packets:1498792 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
351 TX packets:1284980 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 351 TX packets:1284980 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
430 <ti>/dev/hda2</ti> 430 <ti>/dev/hda2</ti>
431 </tr> 431 </tr>
432 <tr> 432 <tr>
433 <ti>root partition, containing main filesystem (/usr, /home, etc)</ti> 433 <ti>root partition, containing main filesystem (/usr, /home, etc)</ti>
434 <ti>&gt;=1.5 Gigabytes</ti> 434 <ti>&gt;=1.5 Gigabytes</ti>
435 <ti>ReiserFS, ext3 recommended; ext2 ok</ti> 435 <ti>ReiserFS, ext3 recommended; ext2 ok</ti>
436 <ti>/dev/hda3</ti> 436 <ti>/dev/hda3</ti>
437 </tr> 437 </tr>
438 </table> 438 </table>
439 <p>Before creating filesystems, you may want to initialize the 439 <p>Before creating filesystems, you may want to initialize the
440 beginning of your HD using <c>dd</c>. Doing this will ensure that your new filesystem 440 beginning of your HD using <c>dd</c>. Doing this will ensure that your new filesystem
441 will not be mis-indentified by Linux's mounting code. 441 will not be mis-indentified by Linux's mounting code.
442 This can be done as follows: 442 This can be done as follows:
443 </p> 443 </p>
444 <pre caption="Initializing first 1024 Sectors of HD"> 444 <pre caption="Initializing first 1024 Sectors of HD">
445# <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdxy bs=1024 count=1024 </c> 445# <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdxy bs=1K</c>
446<comment>Replace /dev/hdxy with the device you wish to &quot;clean.&quot;</comment> 446<comment>Replace /dev/hdxy with the device you wish to &quot;clean.&quot;</comment>
447 </pre> 447 </pre>
448 <p>At this point, create your partitions using <c>fdisk</c>. Note that your partitions 448 <p>At this point, create your partitions using <c>fdisk</c>. Note that your partitions
449 should be of type 82 if swap and 83 for regular filesystems (whether ReiserFS, ext2/3 or other). </p> 449 should be of type 82 if swap and 83 for regular filesystems (whether ReiserFS, ext2/3 or other). </p>
450 <note><c>cfdisk</c> is included on the install CD, and it is <i>considerably</i> easier to use than 450 <note><c>cfdisk</c> is included on the install CD, and it is <i>considerably</i> easier to use than
451 <c>fdisk</c>. Just type <c>cfdisk</c> to run it; by default, cfdisk will work with <b>/dev/hda</b>. If /dev/hda is not the hard disk you want to partition, give the right value to cfdisk as a parameter. For example: <c>cfdisk /dev/hde</c></note> 451 <c>fdisk</c>. Just type <c>cfdisk</c> to run it; by default, cfdisk will work with <b>/dev/hda</b>. If /dev/hda is not the hard disk you want to partition, give the right value to cfdisk as a parameter. For example: <c>cfdisk /dev/hde</c></note>
452 <note>If <c>fdisk</c> or <c>cfdisk</c> instruct you to do so, please reboot to allow your system to detect the 452 <note>If <c>fdisk</c> or <c>cfdisk</c> instruct you to do so, please reboot to allow your system to detect the
453new partition configuration.</note> 453new partition configuration.</note>
454 <note>If you are using RAID your partitions will be a little different. You 454 <note>If you are using RAID your partitions will be a little different. You
455will have the partitions like this: <path>/dev/ataraid/discX/partY</path> X is 455will have the partitions like this: <path>/dev/ataraid/discX/partY</path> X is
456the arrays you have made, so if you only have made 1 array, then it will be 456the arrays you have made, so if you only have made 1 array, then it will be
457disc0.Y is the partition number as in <path>/dev/hdaY</path> </note> 457disc0.Y is the partition number as in <path>/dev/hdaY</path> </note>
458 <p>Once you've created your partitions, it's time to initialize 458 <p>Once you've created your partitions, it's time to initialize
459 the filesystems that will be used to house our data. Initialize swap as follows:</p> 459 the filesystems that will be used to house our data. Initialize swap as follows:</p>
460 <pre caption="Initializing Swap"> 460 <pre caption="Initializing Swap">
661 <p>The &quot;bootstrap&quot; process will now begin. 661 <p>The &quot;bootstrap&quot; process will now begin.
662 </p> 662 </p>
663 <note> 663 <note>
664 Portage by default uses <c>/var/tmp</c> during package building, often 664 Portage by default uses <c>/var/tmp</c> during package building, often
665 using several hundred megabytes of temporary storage. If you would like to 665 using several hundred megabytes of temporary storage. If you would like to
666 change where Portage stores these temporary files, set a new PORTAGE_TMPDIR <e>before</e> 666 change where Portage stores these temporary files, set a new PORTAGE_TMPDIR <e>before</e>
667 starting the bootstrap process, as follows: 667 starting the bootstrap process, as follows:
668 </note> 668 </note>
669 <pre caption="Changing Portage's Storage Path"> 669 <pre caption="Changing Portage's Storage Path">
670# <c>export PORTAGE_TMPDIR=&quot;/otherdir/tmp&quot;</c> 670# <c>export PORTAGE_TMPDIR=&quot;/otherdir/tmp&quot;</c>
671 </pre> 671 </pre>
672 <p><c>bootstrap.sh</c> will build <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, <c>gettext</c>, 672 <p><c>bootstrap.sh</c> will build <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, <c>gettext</c>,
673 and <c>glibc</c>, rebuilding <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, and <c>gettext</c> 673 and <c>glibc</c>, rebuilding <c>binutils</c>, <c>gcc</c>, and <c>gettext</c>
674 after <c>glibc</c>. Needless to say, this process takes a while. 674 after <c>glibc</c>. Needless to say, this process takes a while.
675 Have a nice nap. Once this process completes, your system will be equivalent to a &quot;stage2&quot; system, 675 Have a nice nap. Once this process completes, your system will be equivalent to a &quot;stage2&quot; system,
676 which means you can skip the rest of the stage installs, and move onto final installation. 676 which means you can now move on to the stage2 instructions.
677 </p> 677 </p>
678 </body> 678 </body>
679 </section> 679 </section>
680 </chapter> 680 </chapter>
681 <chapter> 681 <chapter>
682 <title>Starting from Stage2</title> 682 <title>Starting from Stage2</title>
683 <section> 683 <section>
684 <body> 684 <body>
685 <p>The stage2 tarball already has the bootstrapping done for you. All that you have 685 <p>The stage2 tarball already has the bootstrapping done for you. All that you have
686 to do is install the rest of the system. 686 to do is install the rest of the system.
687 </p> 687 </p>
688 <note> 688 <note>
689 If you haven't done so, please edit <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to your flavor. 689 If you haven't done so, please edit <path>/etc/make.conf</path> to your flavor.
690 </note> 690 </note>
691 <pre caption="Installing the Rest of the System"> 691 <pre caption="Installing the Rest of the System">

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