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23 </author> 23 </author>
24 <author title="Editor"> 24 <author title="Editor">
25 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail> 25 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail>
26 </author> 26 </author>
27 <author title="Editor"> 27 <author title="Editor">
28 <mail link="seo@gentoo.org">Jungmin Seo</mail> 28 <mail link="seo@gentoo.org">Jungmin Seo</mail>
29 </author> 29 </author>
30 <author title="Editor"> 30 <author title="Editor">
31 <mail link="zhware@gentoo.org">Stoyan Zhekov</mail> 31 <mail link="zhware@gentoo.org">Stoyan Zhekov</mail>
32 </author> 32 </author>
33 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 33 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
34 Linux 1.4_rc2. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 34 Linux 1.4_rc2. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
35 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 35 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
36 scratch. 36 scratch.
37 </abstract> 37 </abstract>
38 <version>2.3.10</version> 38 <version>2.3.11</version>
39 <date>15 January 2003</date> 39 <date>15 January 2003</date>
40 <chapter> 40 <chapter>
41 <title>About the Install</title> 41 <title>About the Install</title>
42 <section> 42 <section>
43 <body> 43 <body>
44 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 44 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
45as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 45as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
46Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the 46Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the
47kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In 47kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In
48addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that 48addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that
49Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and 49Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and
50establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and download 50establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and download
51files. </p> 51files. </p>
52 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 52 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
53ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully 53ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully
590# <c>cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf</c> 590# <c>cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf</c>
591 </pre> 591 </pre>
592<p>If you are going to use GRP, now would be a good time to execute the following commands: 592<p>If you are going to use GRP, now would be a good time to execute the following commands:
593</p> 593</p>
594 594
595<pre caption="Getting ready for GRP"> 595<pre caption="Getting ready for GRP">
596# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/GRP</c> 596# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/GRP</c>
597# <c>mount -o bind /mnt/cdrom/gentoo/packages /mnt/gentoo/GRP</c> 597# <c>mount -o bind /mnt/cdrom/gentoo/packages /mnt/gentoo/GRP</c>
598</pre> 598</pre>
599 599
600 <pre caption="Entering the chroot Environment"> 600 <pre caption="Entering the chroot Environment">
601# <c>chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash</c> 601# <c>chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash</c>
602# <c>env-update</c> 602# <c>env-update</c>
603Regenerating /etc/ld.so.cache... 603Regenerating /etc/ld.so.cache...
604# <c>source /etc/profile</c> 604# <c>source /etc/profile</c>
605<comment>The above points your shell to the new paths and updated binaries. </comment>
605 </pre> 606 </pre>
606 <p>After you execute these commands, you'll be &quot;inside&quot; your new Gentoo Linux environment. 607 <p>After you execute these commands, you'll be &quot;inside&quot; your new Gentoo Linux environment.
607 </p> 608 </p>
608 </body> 609 </body>
609 </section> 610 </section>
610 </chapter> 611 </chapter>
611 <chapter> 612 <chapter>
612 <title>Getting the Current Portage Tree using Rsync</title> 613 <title>Getting the Current Portage Tree using Rsync</title>
613 <section> 614 <section>
614 <body> 615 <body>
615 <p>Now, you'll need to run <c>emerge sync</c>. This will make sure that 616 <p>Now, you'll need to run <c>emerge sync</c>. This will make sure that
616 you have the most current copy of the Portage tree. </p> 617 you have the most current copy of the Portage tree. </p>
617 <pre caption="Updating Using Rsync"> 618 <pre caption="Updating Using Rsync">
618# <c>emerge sync</c> 619# <c>emerge sync</c>
619 </pre> 620 </pre>
853 </warn> 854 </warn>
854 <p>Choose a kernel and then merge as follows:</p> 855 <p>Choose a kernel and then merge as follows:</p>
855 <pre caption="Emerging Kernel Sources"> 856 <pre caption="Emerging Kernel Sources">
856# <c>emerge sys-kernel/gentoo-sources</c> 857# <c>emerge sys-kernel/gentoo-sources</c>
857 </pre> 858 </pre>
858 <p>Once you have a Linux kernel source tree available, it's time to compile your own custom kernel. 859 <p>Once you have a Linux kernel source tree available, it's time to compile your own custom kernel.
859 </p> 860 </p>
860 <p>Please note that <path>/usr/src/linux</path> is a symlink to your current emerged kernel source package, 861 <p>Please note that <path>/usr/src/linux</path> is a symlink to your current emerged kernel source package,
861 which is set automatically by Portage at emerge time. 862 which is set automatically by Portage at emerge time.
862 If you have multiple kernel source packages, it is necessary to set the <path>/usr/src/linux</path> symlink 863 If you have multiple kernel source packages, it is necessary to set the <path>/usr/src/linux</path> symlink
863 to the correct one before proceeding. 864 to the correct one before proceeding.
864 </p> 865 </p>
865 <pre caption="Compiling the Linux Kernel"> 866 <pre caption="Compiling the Linux Kernel">
866# <c>cd /usr/src/linux</c> 867# <c>cd /usr/src/linux</c>
867# <c>source /etc/profile</c> 868# <c>source /etc/profile</c>
869<comment>Again, this updates your paths. If you get an error saying gcc is not found,
870this is what you may have to do. </comment>
868# <c>make menuconfig</c> 871# <c>make menuconfig</c>
869# <c>make dep &amp;&amp; make clean bzImage modules modules_install</c> 872# <c>make dep &amp;&amp; make clean bzImage modules modules_install</c>
870# <c>mv /boot/bzImage /boot/bzImage.orig</c> 873# <c>mv /boot/bzImage /boot/bzImage.orig</c>
871<comment>[if bzImage already exists]</comment> 874<comment>[if bzImage already exists]</comment>
872# <c>cp /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot</c> 875# <c>cp /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot</c>
873 </pre> 876 </pre>
874 <warn>For your kernel to function properly, there are several options that you will 877 <warn>For your kernel to function properly, there are several options that you will
875 need to ensure are in the kernel proper -- that is, they should <i>be enabled and not 878 need to ensure are in the kernel proper -- that is, they should <i>be enabled and not
876 compiled as modules</i>. You will need to enable the <i>&quot;Code maturity 879 compiled as modules</i>. You will need to enable the <i>&quot;Code maturity
877 level options --&gt; Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers&quot;</i> 880 level options --&gt; Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers&quot;</i>
878 option to see several of these selections. 881 option to see several of these selections.
879 Under the &quot;File systems&quot; section, be sure to enable the <i>&quot;Device File System&quot;</i> (note that 882 Under the &quot;File systems&quot; section, be sure to enable the <i>&quot;Device File System&quot;</i> (note that
880 you <e>don't</e> need to enable the &quot;/dev/pts file system support&quot; option). You'll also 883 you <e>don't</e> need to enable the &quot;/dev/pts file system support&quot; option). You'll also
881 need to enable the <i>&quot;Virtual Memory Filesystem&quot;</i>. Be sure to enable &quot;ReiserFS&quot; if you have 884 need to enable the <i>&quot;Virtual Memory Filesystem&quot;</i>. Be sure to enable &quot;ReiserFS&quot; if you have
882 any ReiserFS partitions; the same goes for &quot;Ext3&quot;. If you're using XFS, enable the 885 any ReiserFS partitions; the same goes for &quot;Ext3&quot;. If you're using XFS, enable the
1153 <section> 1156 <section>
1154 <body> 1157 <body>
1155 <pre caption="Basic Configuration"> 1158 <pre caption="Basic Configuration">
1156# <c>nano -w /etc/rc.conf</c> 1159# <c>nano -w /etc/rc.conf</c>
1157 </pre> 1160 </pre>
1158 <p>Follow the directions in the file to configure the basic settings. 1161 <p>Follow the directions in the file to configure the basic settings.
1159 All users will want to make sure that <c>CLOCK</c> is set to his/her 1162 All users will want to make sure that <c>CLOCK</c> is set to his/her
1160 liking. International keyboard users will want to set the <c>KEYMAP</c> 1163 liking. International keyboard users will want to set the <c>KEYMAP</c>
1161 variable (browse <path>/usr/share/keymaps</path> to see the various 1164 variable (browse <path>/usr/share/keymaps</path> to see the various
1162 possibilities). 1165 possibilities).
1163 </p> 1166 </p>
1164 </body> 1167 </body>
1165 </section> 1168 </section>
1166 </chapter> 1169 </chapter>
1167 <chapter> 1170 <chapter>
1168 <title>Final steps: Configure GRUB</title> 1171 <title>Final steps: Configure a Bootloader</title>
1169 <section> 1172 <section>
1173 <title>Notes</title>
1174 <body>
1175 <p> In the spirit of Gentoo, users now have more than one bootloader to choose from.
1176 Using our virtual package system, users are now able to choose between both GRUB and
1177 LILO as their bootloaders.
1178 </p>
1179 <p> Please keep in mind that having both bootloaders installed is not necessary.
1180 In fact, it can be a hinderance, so please only choose one.
1181 </p>
1182 </body>
1183 </section>
1184 <section>
1185 <title>Configuring GRUB</title>
1170 <body> 1186 <body>
1171 <p>The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how GRUB 1187 <p>The most critical part of understanding GRUB is getting comfortable with how GRUB
1172 refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition <path>/dev/hda1</path> is called 1188 refers to hard drives and partitions. Your Linux partition <path>/dev/hda1</path> is called
1173 <path>(hd0,0)</path> under GRUB. Notice the parenthesis around the hd0,0 - they are required. 1189 <path>(hd0,0)</path> under GRUB. Notice the parenthesis around the hd0,0 - they are required.
1174 Hard drives count from zero rather than &quot;a&quot;, and partitions start at zero rather than one. 1190 Hard drives count from zero rather than &quot;a&quot;, and partitions start at zero rather than one.
1175 Be aware too that with the hd devices, only harddrives are counted, not atapi-ide devices such as 1191 Be aware too that with the hd devices, only harddrives are counted, not atapi-ide devices such as
1176 cdrom players, burners, and that the same construct can be used with scsi drives. 1192 cdrom players, burners, and that the same construct can be used with scsi drives.
1177 (Normally they get higher numbers than ide drives except when the bios is configured 1193 (Normally they get higher numbers than ide drives except when the bios is configured
1178 to boot from scsi devices.) Assuming you have a harddrive on /dev/hda, a cdrom player on /dev/hdb, 1194 to boot from scsi devices.) Assuming you have a harddrive on /dev/hda, a cdrom player on /dev/hdb,
1179 a burner on /dev/hdc and a second hardrive on /dev/hdd, for example, and no scsi harddrive 1195 a burner on /dev/hdc and a second hardrive on /dev/hdd, for example, and no scsi harddrive
1180 <path>/dev/hdd7</path> gets translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>. 1196 <path>/dev/hdd7</path> gets translated to <path>(hd1,6)</path>.
1181 1197
1182 It might sound tricky, and tricky it is indeed, but as we will see, grub 1198 It might sound tricky, and tricky it is indeed, but as we will see, grub
1183 offers a tab completion mechanism that comes handy for those of you having 1199 offers a tab completion mechanism that comes handy for those of you having
1184 a lot of harddrives and partitions and who are a little lost in the 1200 a lot of harddrives and partitions and who are a little lost in the
1277 <note> 1293 <note>
1278 The path to the kernel image is relative to the boot partition. If for example you have separated boot partition <path>(hd0,0)</path> and root partition <path>(hd0,1)</path>, all paths in the grub.conf file above will become <path>/bzImage</path>. 1294 The path to the kernel image is relative to the boot partition. If for example you have separated boot partition <path>(hd0,0)</path> and root partition <path>(hd0,1)</path>, all paths in the grub.conf file above will become <path>/bzImage</path>.
1279 </note> 1295 </note>
1280 <p>If you need to pass any additional options to the kernel, simply 1296 <p>If you need to pass any additional options to the kernel, simply
1281 add them to the end of the <c>kernel</c> command. We're already passing one option 1297 add them to the end of the <c>kernel</c> command. We're already passing one option
1282 (<c>root=/dev/hda3</c>), but you can pass others as well. In particular, you can 1298 (<c>root=/dev/hda3</c>), but you can pass others as well. In particular, you can
1283 turn off devfs by default (not recommended unless you know what you're doing) by 1299 turn off devfs by default (not recommended unless you know what you're doing) by
1284 adding the <c>gentoo=nodevfs</c> option to the <c>kernel</c> command. 1300 adding the <c>gentoo=nodevfs</c> option to the <c>kernel</c> command.
1285 </p> 1301 </p>
1286 <note>Unlike in earlier versions of Gentoo Linux, you no longer have to add 1302 <note>Unlike in earlier versions of Gentoo Linux, you no longer have to add
1287 <c>devfs=mount</c> to the end of the <c>kernel</c> line to enable devfs. In rc6 1303 <c>devfs=mount</c> to the end of the <c>kernel</c> line to enable devfs. In rc6
1288 devfs is enabled by default. 1304 devfs is enabled by default.
1289 </note> 1305 </note>
1290 </body> 1306 </body>
1291 </section> 1307 </section>
1292 </chapter> 1308 <section>
1293 <chapter>
1294 <title>Final steps: Configure LILO</title> 1309 <title>Configuring LILO</title>
1295 <section>
1296 <body> 1310 <body>
1297 <p>While GRUB may be the new alternative for most people, it is not always the best choice. 1311 <p>While GRUB may be the new alternative for most people, it is not always the best choice.
1298 LILO, the LInuxLOader, is the tried and true workhorse of Linux bootloaders. Here's how to install 1312 LILO, the LInuxLOader, is the tried and true workhorse of Linux bootloaders. Here's how to install
1299 LILO if you would like to use it instead of GRUB: 1313 LILO if you would like to use it instead of GRUB:
1300 </p> 1314 </p>
1301 <p>The first step is to emerge LILO: 1315 <p>The first step is to emerge LILO:
1302 </p> 1316 </p>
1303 <pre caption="Emerging LILO"> 1317 <pre caption="Emerging LILO">
1304# <c>emerge lilo</c> 1318# <c>emerge lilo</c>
1305 </pre> 1319 </pre>
1306 <p>Now it is time to configure LILO. I will give you a small <i>lilo.conf</i> to use, and I will explain 1320 <p>Now it is time to configure LILO. I will give you a small <i>lilo.conf</i> to use, and I will explain
1307 the different parts of the file. 1321 the different parts of the file.
1308 </p> 1322 </p>
1309 <pre caption="Example lilo.conf"> 1323 <pre caption="Example lilo.conf">
1310boot=/dev/hda 1324boot=/dev/hda

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