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23 </author> 23 </author>
24 <author title="Editor"> 24 <author title="Editor">
25 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail> 25 <mail link="rajiv@gentoo.org">Rajiv Manglani</mail>
26 </author> 26 </author>
27 <author title="Editor"> 27 <author title="Editor">
28 <mail link="seo@gentoo.org">Jungmin Seo</mail> 28 <mail link="seo@gentoo.org">Jungmin Seo</mail>
29 </author> 29 </author>
30 <author title="Editor"> 30 <author title="Editor">
31 <mail link="zhware@gentoo.org">Stoyan Zhekov</mail> 31 <mail link="zhware@gentoo.org">Stoyan Zhekov</mail>
32 </author> 32 </author>
33 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 33 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
34 Linux 1.4_rc2. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 34 Linux 1.4_rc2. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
35 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 35 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
36 scratch. 36 scratch.
37 </abstract> 37 </abstract>
38 <version>2.3.11</version> 38<version>2.3.12</version>
39 <date>15 January 2003</date> 39 <date>03 Feb 2003</date>
40 <chapter> 40 <chapter>
41 <title>About the Install</title> 41 <title>About the Install</title>
42 <section> 42 <section>
43 <body> 43 <body>
44 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 44 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
45as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 45as many SCSI CD-ROM, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
46Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the 46Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the
47kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In 47kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In
48addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that 48addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that
49Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and 49Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and
50establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and download 50establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and download
51files. </p> 51files. </p>
52 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 52 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
53ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully 53ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo linux has been successfully
54built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully 54built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully
103 <p>Inside each of these directories, 103 <p>Inside each of these directories,
104you'll find a <path>livecd/</path> directory that contains LiveCDs. While these LiveCDs 104you'll find a <path>livecd/</path> directory that contains LiveCDs. While these LiveCDs
105will boot on any architecture, the install-related tarballs are optimized for a particular 105will boot on any architecture, the install-related tarballs are optimized for a particular
106CPU type and will not work on all systems, except for the &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; LiveCD in the <path>x86</path> 106CPU type and will not work on all systems, except for the &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; LiveCD in the <path>x86</path>
107directory which can be used to install on anything. 107directory which can be used to install on anything.
108</p> 108</p>
109 <p> The LiveCDs are full CD images that should be burned to a CDR or CD-RW 109 <p> The LiveCDs are full CD images that should be burned to a CDR or CD-RW
110using CD burning software. Currently, we have two types of LiveCDs. The first 110using CD burning software. Currently, we have two types of LiveCDs. The first
111carries the &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; label, and is approximately 40MB in size and lives 111carries the &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; label, and is approximately 40MB in size and lives
112in the <path>x86/livecd/</path> directory. This LiveCD is of minimal size to 112in the <path>x86/livecd/</path> directory. This LiveCD is of minimal size to
113allow for a initial quick download and contains a stage1 tarball that can be 113allow for a initial quick download and contains a stage1 tarball that can be
114found in <path>/mnt/cdrom/gentoo/</path> after the CD has booted.</p> 114found in <path>/mnt/cdrom/gentoo/</path> after the CD has booted.</p>
115 <p>The second flavor of LiveCD we currently offer is labelled &quot;livecd-grp.&quot; 115 <p>The second flavor of LiveCD we currently offer is labelled &quot;livecd-grp.&quot;
116These CDs (found in their respective <path>arch/livecd</path> directories) 116These CDs (found in their respective <path>arch/livecd</path> directories)
117contain stage1, 2 and 3 tarballs, and also contain a set of GRP packages 117contain stage1, 2 and 3 tarballs, and also contain a set of GRP packages
118optimized for a specific architecture. Using these LiveCDs, it will be possible 118optimized for a specific architecture. GRP is simply precompiled packages for
119very large applications, such as XFree86. KDE, GNOME, OpenOffice, etc.
120Using these LiveCDs, it will be possible
119for you to install a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system very quickly. The 121for you to install a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system very quickly. The
120downside is that these ISO images are large -- around 600MB -- so they can take 122downside is that these ISO images are large -- around 600MB -- so they can take
121a while to download.</p> 123a while to download.</p>
122 <info>If for some reason your install gets interrupted at some point, you can 124 <info>If for some reason your install gets interrupted at some point, you can
123reboot and restart. For example, if you have partitioned, installed the stageX 125reboot and restart. For example, if you have partitioned, installed the stageX
124tarball, and are ready to chroot, you can restart the install if necessary. 126tarball, and are ready to chroot, you can restart the install if necessary.
125Just re-boot with the LiveCD, then mount your drives/partitions to 127Just re-boot with the LiveCD, then mount your drives/partitions to
126<path>/mnt</path> as normal. Basically, you can do this at about any point 128<path>/mnt</path> as normal. Basically, you can do this at about any point
127during the install, just not before partitioning for obvious reasons. </info> 129during the install, just not before partitioning for obvious reasons. </info>
128 <warn>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish to 130 <warn>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish to
129report it as a bug, report it to <uri>http://bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug 131report it as a bug, report it to <uri>http://bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug
130needs to be moved upstream to the package maintainers (ie KDE) the 132needs to be moved upstream to the package maintainers (ie KDE) the
131<e>developers</e> will take care of that. </warn> 133<e>developers</e> will take care of that. </warn>
132 <p>Now, let's quickly review the install process. First, we'll download, burn 134 <p>Now, let's quickly review the install process. First, we'll download, burn
133and boot a LiveCD. After getting a root prompt, we'll create partitions, create 135and boot a LiveCD. After getting a root prompt, we'll create partitions, create
383 <p>Now that the kernel can see the network card and disk controllers, it's time 385 <p>Now that the kernel can see the network card and disk controllers, it's time
384 to set up disk partitions for Gentoo Linux. 386 to set up disk partitions for Gentoo Linux.
385 </p> 387 </p>
386 <p>Here's a quick overview of the standard Gentoo Linux partition layout. 388 <p>Here's a quick overview of the standard Gentoo Linux partition layout.
387 We're going to create at least three partitions: a swap partition, a root 389 We're going to create at least three partitions: a swap partition, a root
388 partition (to hold the bulk of Gentoo Linux), and a special boot partition. 390 partition (to hold the bulk of Gentoo Linux), and a special boot partition.
389 The boot partition is designed to hold the GRUB or LILO boot loader information as well as 391 The boot partition is designed to hold the GRUB or LILO boot loader information as well as
390 your Linux kernel(s). The boot partition gives us a safe place to store 392 your Linux kernel(s). The boot partition gives us a safe place to store
391 everything related to booting Linux. During normal day-to-day Gentoo Linux use, 393 everything related to booting Linux. During normal day-to-day Gentoo Linux use,
392 your boot partition should remain <e>unmounted</e>. This prevents your kernel 394 your boot partition should remain <e>unmounted</e>. This prevents your kernel
393 from being made unavailable to GRUB (due to filesystem corruption) in the event 395 from being made unavailable to GRUB (due to filesystem corruption) in the event
394 of a system crash, preventing the chicken-and-egg problem where GRUB can't read 396 of a system crash, preventing the chicken-and-egg problem where GRUB can't read
395 your kernel (since your filesystem isn't consistent) but you can't bring your 397 your kernel (since your filesystem isn't consistent) but you can't bring your
396 filesystem back to a consistent state (since you can't boot!) 398 filesystem back to a consistent state (since you can't boot!)
397 </p> 399 </p>
398 <p>Now, on to filesystem types. Right now, you have four filesystem options: 400 <p>Now, on to filesystem types. Right now, you have five filesystem options:
399 XFS, ext2, ext3 (journaling) and ReiserFS. ext2 is the tried and true Linux 401 XFS, ext2, ext3 (journaling), jfs, and ReiserFS. ext2 is the tried and true Linux
400 filesystem but doesn't have metadata journaling. ext3 is the new version of 402 filesystem but doesn't have metadata journaling. ext3 is the new version of
401 ext2 with both metadata journaling and ordered data writes, effectively 403 ext2 with both metadata journaling and ordered data writes, effectively
402 providing data journaling as well. ReiserFS is a B*-tree based filesystem 404 providing data journaling as well. ReiserFS is a B*-tree based filesystem
403 that has very good small file performance, and greatly outperforms both ext2 and 405 that has very good small file performance, and greatly outperforms both ext2 and
404 ext3 when dealing with small files (files less than 4k), often by a factor of 406 ext3 when dealing with small files (files less than 4k), often by a factor of
405 10x-15x. ReiserFS also scales extremely well and has metadata journaling. 407 10x-15x. ReiserFS also scales extremely well and has metadata journaling.
406 As of kernel 2.4.18+, ReiserFS is finally rock-solid and highly recommended. 408 As of kernel 2.4.18+, ReiserFS is finally rock-solid and highly recommended.
407 XFS is a filesystem with metadata journaling that 409 XFS is a filesystem with metadata journaling that
408 is fully supported under Gentoo Linux's <path>xfs-sources</path> kernel, but 410 is fully supported under Gentoo Linux's <path>xfs-sources</path> kernel, but
409 is generally not recommended due to its tendency to lose recently-modified 411 is generally not recommended due to its tendency to lose recently-modified
410 data if your system locks up or unexpectedly reboots (due to a power failure, for instance.) 412 data if your system locks up or unexpectedly reboots (due to a power failure, for instance.)
411 </p> 413 Finially, jfs is IBM's own high performance journaling filesystem. Since it is obscure, we cannot comment either positvely nor negatively on its stability.</p>
412 <p>If you're looking for the most standard filesystem, use ext2. If you're looking 414 <p>If you're looking for the most standard filesystem, use ext2. If you're looking
413 for the most rugged journalled filesystem, use ext3. If you're looking for a 415 for the most rugged journalled filesystem, use ext3. If you're looking for a
414 high-performance filesystem with journaling support, use ReiserFS; both ext3 and ReiserFS are 416 high-performance filesystem with journaling support, use ReiserFS; both ext3 and ReiserFS are
415 mature and refined. 417 mature and refined.
416 Here are our basic recommended filesystem 418 Here are our basic recommended filesystem
417 sizes and types: 419 sizes and types:
418 </p> 420 </p>
419 <table> 421 <table>
420 <tr> 422 <tr>
421 <th>Partition</th> 423 <th>Partition</th>
422 <th>Size</th> 424 <th>Size</th>
423 <th>Type</th> 425 <th>Type</th>
424 <th>example device</th> 426 <th>example device</th>
425 </tr> 427 </tr>
426 <tr> 428 <tr>
490 later attempts to mount may fail without an explicit <c>mount -t xfs</c>. 492 later attempts to mount may fail without an explicit <c>mount -t xfs</c>.
491 The solution is to zero out the partition before creating the XFS filesystem: 493 The solution is to zero out the partition before creating the XFS filesystem:
492 <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hd<comment>x</comment> bs=1k</c>. 494 <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hd<comment>x</comment> bs=1k</c>.
493 </warn> 495 </warn>
494 <p>If you'd like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using <c>mke2fs -j</c>.</p> 496 <p>If you'd like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using <c>mke2fs -j</c>.</p>
495 <pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem"> 497 <pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem">
496# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c> 498# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c>
497 </pre> 499 </pre>
498 <note>You can find out more about using ext3 under Linux 2.4 at 500 <note>You can find out more about using ext3 under Linux 2.4 at
499 <uri>http://www.zip.com.au/~akpm/linux/ext3/ext3-usage.html</uri>. 501 <uri>http://www.zip.com.au/~akpm/linux/ext3/ext3-usage.html</uri>.
500 </note> 502 </note>
501 <p>To create ReiserFS filesystems, use the <c>mkreiserfs</c> command.</p> 503 <p>To create ReiserFS filesystems, use the <c>mkreiserfs</c> command.</p>
502 <pre caption="Creating a ReiserFS Filesystem"> 504 <pre caption="Creating a ReiserFS Filesystem">
503# <c>mkreiserfs /dev/hda3</c> 505# <c>mkreiserfs /dev/hda3</c>
504 </pre> 506 </pre>
507
508 <p>To create JFS filesystems, use the <c>mkfs.jfs</c> comamnd.</p>
509 <pre caption="Creating a JFS Filesystem">
510# <c>mkfs.jfs /dev/hda3</c>
511 </pre>
512
505 </body> 513 </body>
506 </section> 514 </section>
507 </chapter> 515 </chapter>
508 <chapter> 516 <chapter>
509 <title>Mount Partitions</title> 517 <title>Mount Partitions</title>
510 <section> 518 <section>
511 <body> 519 <body>
512 <p>Now, we'll activate our new swap, since we may need the additional virtual memory that 520 <p>Now, we'll activate our new swap, since we may need the additional virtual memory that
513 provides later: 521 provides later:
514 </p> 522 </p>
515 <pre caption="Activating Swap"> 523 <pre caption="Activating Swap">
516# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c> 524# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c>
517 </pre> 525 </pre>
518 <p>Next, we'll create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mountpoints, 526 <p>Next, we'll create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mountpoints,
519 and we'll mount our filesystems to these mountpoints. </p> 527 and we'll mount our filesystems to these mountpoints. </p>
867# <c>cd /usr/src/linux</c> 875# <c>cd /usr/src/linux</c>
868# <c>source /etc/profile</c> 876# <c>source /etc/profile</c>
869<comment>Again, this updates your paths. If you get an error saying gcc is not found, 877<comment>Again, this updates your paths. If you get an error saying gcc is not found,
870this is what you may have to do. </comment> 878this is what you may have to do. </comment>
871# <c>make menuconfig</c> 879# <c>make menuconfig</c>
872# <c>make dep &amp;&amp; make clean bzImage modules modules_install</c> 880# <c>make dep &amp;&amp; make clean bzImage modules modules_install</c>
873# <c>mv /boot/bzImage /boot/bzImage.orig</c> 881# <c>mv /boot/bzImage /boot/bzImage.orig</c>
874<comment>[if bzImage already exists]</comment> 882<comment>[if bzImage already exists]</comment>
875# <c>cp /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot</c> 883# <c>cp /usr/src/linux/arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot</c>
876 </pre> 884 </pre>
877 <warn>For your kernel to function properly, there are several options that you will 885 <warn>For your kernel to function properly, there are several options that you will
878 need to ensure are in the kernel proper -- that is, they should <i>be enabled and not 886 need to ensure are in the kernel proper -- that is, they should <i>be enabled and not
879 compiled as modules</i>. You will need to enable the <i>&quot;Code maturity 887 compiled as modules</i>. You will need to enable the <i>&quot;Code maturity
880 level options --&gt; Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers&quot;</i> 888 level options --&gt; Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers&quot;</i>
881 option to see several of these selections. 889 option to see several of these selections.
882 Under the &quot;File systems&quot; section, be sure to enable the <i>&quot;Device File System&quot;</i> (note that 890 Under the &quot;File systems&quot; section, be sure to enable the <i>&quot;/dev&quot; file system support</i> (note that
883 you <e>don't</e> need to enable the &quot;/dev/pts file system support&quot; option). You'll also 891 you <e>don't</e> need to enable the &quot;/dev/pts file system support&quot; option). You'll also
884 need to enable the <i>&quot;Virtual Memory Filesystem&quot;</i>. Be sure to enable &quot;ReiserFS&quot; if you have 892 need to enable the <i>&quot;Virtual Memory Filesystem&quot;</i>. Be sure to enable &quot;ReiserFS&quot; if you have
885 any ReiserFS partitions; the same goes for &quot;Ext3&quot;. If you're using XFS, enable the 893 any ReiserFS partitions; the same goes for &quot;Ext3&quot;. If you're using XFS, enable the
886 &quot;SGI XFS filesystem support&quot; 894 &quot;SGI XFS filesystem support&quot;
887 option. It's always a good idea to leave ext2 895 option. It's always a good idea to leave ext2
888 enabled whether you are using it or not. Also, most people using IDE hard drives will 896 enabled whether you are using it or not. Also, most people using IDE hard drives will
889 want to enable the &quot;USE DMA by default&quot; option; otherwise, your IDE drives may perform 897 want to enable the &quot;USE DMA by default&quot; option; otherwise, your IDE drives may perform
890 very poorly. Of course, remember to enable &quot;IDE disk&quot; support as well -- otherwise your 898 very poorly. Of course, remember to enable &quot;IDE disk&quot; support as well -- otherwise your
891 kernel won't be able to see your IDE disks. 899 kernel won't be able to see your IDE disks.
892 </warn> 900 </warn>
893 <p>If you are using hardware RAID you will need to enable a couple more options in the kernel: 901 <p>If you are using hardware RAID you will need to enable a couple more options in the kernel:
894 For Highpoint RAID controllers select hpt366 chipset support, support for IDE RAID controllers and Highpoint 902 For Highpoint RAID controllers select hpt366 chipset support, support for IDE RAID controllers and Highpoint
895 370 software RAID.For Promise RAID controllers select PROMISE PDC202{46|62|65|67|68|69|70} support, 903 370 software RAID.For Promise RAID controllers select PROMISE PDC202{46|62|65|67|68|69|70} support,
896 support for IDE RAID 904 support for IDE RAID
897 controllers and Support Promise software RAID (Fasttrak(tm)) 905 controllers and Support Promise software RAID (Fasttrak(tm))
996 it has not been installed. It would be the good time to do it. </p> 1004 it has not been installed. It would be the good time to do it. </p>
997 <pre caption="Installing rp-pppoe"> 1005 <pre caption="Installing rp-pppoe">
998# <c>USE="-X" emerge rp-pppoe</c> 1006# <c>USE="-X" emerge rp-pppoe</c>
999 </pre> 1007 </pre>
1000 1008
1001 <note>The <i>USE="-X"</i> prevents pppoe from installing its optional X interface, which is a good thing, 1009 <note>The <i>USE="-X"</i> prevents pppoe from installing its optional X interface, which is a good thing,
1002 because X and its dependencies would also be emerged. You can always recompile <i>rp-pppoe</i> with 1010 because X and its dependencies would also be emerged. You can always recompile <i>rp-pppoe</i> with
1003 X support later. 1011 X support later.
1004 </note> 1012 </note>
1005 <note> Please note that the rp-pppoe is built but not configured. 1013 <note> Please note that the rp-pppoe is built but not configured.
1006 You will have to do it again using <c>adsl-setup</c> when you boot into your Gentoo system 1014 You will have to do it again using <c>adsl-setup</c> when you boot into your Gentoo system
1007 for the first time. 1015 for the first time.
1008 </note> 1016 </note>
1009 <p>You may need to install some additional packages in the Portage tree 1017 <p>You may need to install some additional packages in the Portage tree
1010 if you are using any optional features like XFS, ReiserFS or LVM. If you're 1018 if you are using any optional features like XFS, ReiserFS or LVM. If you're
1011 using XFS, you should emerge the <c>xfsprogs</c> ebuild: 1019 using XFS, you should emerge the <c>xfsprogs</c> package:
1012 </p> 1020 </p>
1013 <pre caption="Emerging Filesystem Tools"> 1021 <pre caption="Emerging Filesystem Tools">
1014# <c>emerge sys-apps/xfsprogs</c> 1022# <c>emerge sys-apps/xfsprogs</c>
1015<comment>If you'd like to use ReiserFS, you should emerge the ReiserFS tools: </comment> 1023<comment>If you'd like to use ReiserFS, you should emerge the ReiserFS tools: </comment>
1016# <c> emerge sys-apps/reiserfsprogs</c> 1024# <c>emerge sys-apps/reiserfsprogs</c>
1025<comment>If you'd like to use JFS, you should emerge the JFS tools: </comment>
1026# <c>emerge jfsutils</c>
1017<comment>If you're using LVM, you should emerge the <c>lvm-user</c> package: </comment> 1027<comment>If you're using LVM, you should emerge the <c>lvm-user</c> package: </comment>
1018# <c>emerge sys-apps/lvm-user</c> 1028# <c>emerge sys-apps/lvm-user</c>
1019 </pre> 1029 </pre>
1020 <p>If you're a laptop user and wish to use your PCMCIA slots on your first 1030 <p>If you're a laptop user and wish to use your PCMCIA slots on your first
1021 real reboot, you'll want to make sure you install the <i>pcmcia-cs</i> package. 1031 real reboot, you'll want to make sure you install the <i>pcmcia-cs</i> package.
1022 </p> 1032 </p>
1023 <pre caption="Emerging PCMCIA-cs"> 1033 <pre caption="Emerging PCMCIA-cs">
1024# <c>emerge sys-apps/pcmcia-cs</c> 1034# <c>emerge sys-apps/pcmcia-cs</c>
1025 </pre> 1035 </pre>
1026 <warn>You will have to re-emerge <i>pcmcia-cs</i> after installation to get PCMCIA 1036 <warn>You will have to re-emerge <i>pcmcia-cs</i> after installation to get PCMCIA
1027 to work. 1037 to work.
1028 </warn> 1038 </warn>
1029 </body> 1039 </body>
1030 </section> 1040 </section>
1031 </chapter> 1041 </chapter>

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