/[gentoo]/xml/htdocs/doc/en/gentoo-x86-install.xml
Gentoo

Diff of /xml/htdocs/doc/en/gentoo-x86-install.xml

Parent Directory Parent Directory | Revision Log Revision Log | View Patch Patch

Revision 1.51 Revision 1.52
193 /lib/modules/*/kernel/drivers/net/*</c>. To load a particular module, 193 /lib/modules/*/kernel/drivers/net/*</c>. To load a particular module,
194 type: 194 type:
195 </p> 195 </p>
196 <pre caption="PCI Modules Configuration"> 196 <pre caption="PCI Modules Configuration">
197# <c>modprobe pcnet32</c> 197# <c>modprobe pcnet32</c>
198<comment>(replace pcnet32 with your NIC module)</comment> 198<comment>(replace pcnet32 with your NIC module)</comment>
199 </pre> 199 </pre>
200 <p>Now, if you want to be able to access any SCSI hardware that wasn't detected 200 <p>Now, if you want to be able to access any SCSI hardware that wasn't detected
201 during the initial boot autodetection process, you'll need to load the appropriate 201 during the initial boot autodetection process, you'll need to load the appropriate
202 modules from /lib/modules, again using <c>modprobe</c>: 202 modules from /lib/modules, again using <c>modprobe</c>:
203 </p> 203 </p>
204 <pre caption="Loading SCSI Modules"> 204 <pre caption="Loading SCSI Modules">
205# <c>modprobe aic7xxx</c> 205# <c>modprobe aic7xxx</c>
206# <c>modprobe sd_mod</c> 206# <c>modprobe sd_mod</c>
207 </pre> 207 </pre>
208 <p><c>aic7xxx</c> supports your SCSI controller and <c>sd_mod</c> supports SCSI hard disks. 208 <p><c>aic7xxx</c> supports your SCSI controller and <c>sd_mod</c> supports SCSI hard disks. </p>
209 <note> 209 <note>
210 Support for a SCSI CD-ROMs and disks are built-in in the kernel. 210 Support for a SCSI CD-ROMs and disks are built-in in the kernel.
211 </note></p> 211 </note>
212 <p>If you are using hardware RAID, you'll need to load the 212 <p>If you are using hardware RAID, you'll need to load the
213 ATA-RAID modules for your RAID controller. 213 ATA-RAID modules for your RAID controller.
214 </p> 214 </p>
215 <pre caption="Loading RAID Modules"> 215 <pre caption="Loading RAID Modules">
216# <c>modprobe ataraid</c> 216# <c>modprobe ataraid</c>
217# <c>modprobe pdcraid</c> 217# <c>modprobe pdcraid</c>
218 <comment>(Promise Raid Controller)</comment> 218 <comment>(Promise Raid Controller)</comment>
219# <c>modprobe hptraid</c> 219# <c>modprobe hptraid</c>
220 <comment>(Highpoint Raid Controller)</comment> 220 <comment>(Highpoint Raid Controller)</comment>
221 </pre> 221 </pre>
222 <p>The Gentoo LiveCD should have enabled DMA on your disks, but if it did not, 222 <p>The Gentoo LiveCD should have enabled DMA on your disks, but if it did not,
223 <c>hdparm</c> can be used to set DMA on your drives. </p> 223 <c>hdparm</c> can be used to set DMA on your drives. </p>
224 <pre caption="Setting DMA"><comment>Replace hdX with your disk device.</comment> 224 <pre caption="Setting DMA"><comment>Replace hdX with your disk device.</comment>
225# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA </comment> 225# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA </comment>
226# hdparm -d1 -A1 -m16 -u1 -a64 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA and other safe performance-enhancing options</comment> 226# hdparm -d1 -A1 -m16 -u1 -a64 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA and other safe performance-enhancing options</comment>
1232grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> 1232grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c>
1233grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0)</c> 1233grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0)</c>
1234grub&gt; <c>quit</c> 1234grub&gt; <c>quit</c>
1235 </pre> 1235 </pre>
1236 <p>Here's how the two commands work. The first <c>root ( )</c> command tells GRUB 1236 <p>Here's how the two commands work. The first <c>root ( )</c> command tells GRUB
1237 the location of your boot partition (in our example, <path>/dev/hda1</path> or 1237 the location of your boot partition (in our example, <path>/dev/hda1</path> or
1238 <path>(hd0,0)</path> in GRUB terminology. Then, the second <c>setup ( ) 1238 <path>(hd0,0)</path> in GRUB terminology. Then, the second <c>setup ( )
1239 </c> command tells GRUB where to install the 1239 </c> command tells GRUB where to install the
1240 boot record - it will be configured to look for its special files at the <c>root 1240 boot record - it will be configured to look for its special files at the <c>root
1241 ( )</c> location that you specified. In my case, I want the boot record on the 1241 ( )</c> location that you specified. In my case, I want the boot record on the
1242 MBR of the hard drive, so I simply specify <path>/dev/hda</path> (also known as <path>(hd0)</path>). 1242 MBR of the hard drive, so I simply specify <path>/dev/hda</path> (also known as <path>(hd0)</path>).
1243 If I were using another boot loader and wanted to set up GRUB as a secondary boot-loader, I 1243 If I were using another boot loader and wanted to set up GRUB as a secondary boot-loader, I
1244 could install GRUB to the boot record of a particular partition. In that case, 1244 could install GRUB to the boot record of a particular partition. In that case,
1245 I'd specify a particular partition rather than the entire disk. Once the GRUB 1245 I'd specify a particular partition rather than the entire disk. Once the GRUB
1246 boot record has been successfully installed, you can type <c>quit</c> to quit GRUB. 1246 boot record has been successfully installed, you can type <c>quit</c> to quit GRUB.
1247 </p>
1247 1248
1248 <note> The tab completion mechanism of grub can be used from within grub, 1249 <note> The tab completion mechanism of grub can be used from within grub,
1249 assuming you wrote <c> root (</c> and that you hit the TAB key, you would 1250 assuming you wrote <c> root (</c> and that you hit the TAB key, you would
1250 be prompted with a list of the available devices (not only harddrives), 1251 be prompted with a list of the available devices (not only harddrives),
1251 hitting the TAB key having written <c> root (hd</c>, grub would print the 1252 hitting the TAB key having written <c> root (hd</c>, grub would print the
1252 available harddrives and hitting the TAB key after writing <c> root (hd0,</c> 1253 available harddrives and hitting the TAB key after writing <c> root (hd0,</c>
1253 would make grub print the list of partitions on the first harddrive. 1254 would make grub print the list of partitions on the first harddrive.
1254 1255
1255 Checking the syntax of the grub location with completion should really help 1256 Checking the syntax of the grub location with completion should really help
1256 to make the right choice. 1257 to make the right choice.
1257 </note> 1258 </note>
1258 1259
1260 <p>
1259 Gentoo Linux is now 1261 Gentoo Linux is now
1260 installed, but we need to create the <path>/boot/grub/grub.conf</path> file so that 1262 installed, but we need to create the <path>/boot/grub/grub.conf</path> file so that
1261 we get a nice GRUB boot menu when the system reboots. Here's how to do it. 1263 we get a nice GRUB boot menu when the system reboots. Here's how to do it.
1262 </p> 1264 </p>
1263 <impo>To ensure backwards compatibility with GRUB, make sure to make a link from 1265 <impo>To ensure backwards compatibility with GRUB, make sure to make a link from
1264 <i>grub.conf</i> to <i>menu.lst</i>. You can do this by doing 1266 <i>grub.conf</i> to <i>menu.lst</i>. You can do this by doing
1265 <c>ln -s /boot/grub/grub.conf /boot/grub/menu.lst </c>. </impo> 1267 <c>ln -s /boot/grub/grub.conf /boot/grub/menu.lst </c>. </impo>
1266 <p>Now, create the grub.conf file (<c>nano -w /boot/grub/grub.conf</c>), and add the following to it: 1268 <p>Now, create the grub.conf file (<c>nano -w /boot/grub/grub.conf</c>), and add the following to it:
1267 </p> 1269 </p>
1268 <pre caption="Grub.conf for GRUB"> 1270 <pre caption="Grub.conf for GRUB">
1269default 0 1271default 0
1270timeout 30 1272timeout 30
1271splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz 1273splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
1272 1274
1273title=My example Gentoo Linux 1275title=My example Gentoo Linux
1340message=/boot/message 1342message=/boot/message
1341lba32 1343lba32
1342default=linux 1344default=linux
1343 1345
1344image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.20 1346image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.20
1345 label=linux 1347 label=linux
1346 initrd=/boot/initrd-2.4.20.img 1348 initrd=/boot/initrd-2.4.20.img
1347 read-only 1349 read-only
1348 root=/dev/hda5 1350 root=/dev/hda5
1349 1351
1350#For dual booting windows/other OS 1352#For dual booting windows/other OS
1351other=/dev/hda1 1353other=/dev/hda1
1352 label=dos 1354 label=dos
1353 1355
1354 </pre> 1356 </pre>
1357 <ul>
1355 <li><i>boot=/dev/hda</i> tells LILO to install itself on the first hard disk on the first IDE controller. </li> 1358 <li><i>boot=/dev/hda</i> tells LILO to install itself on the first hard disk on the first IDE controller. </li>
1356 <li><i>map=/boot/map</i> states the map file. In normal use, this should not be modified. </li> 1359 <li><i>map=/boot/map</i> states the map file. In normal use, this should not be modified. </li>
1357 <li><i>install=/boot/boot.b</i> tells LILO to install the specified file as the new boot sector. 1360 <li><i>install=/boot/boot.b</i> tells LILO to install the specified file as the new boot sector.
1358 In normal use, this should not be altered. If the install line is missing, LILO will 1361 In normal use, this should not be altered. If the install line is missing, LILO will
1359 assume a default of /boot/boot.b as the file to be used. </li> 1362 assume a default of /boot/boot.b as the file to be used. </li>
1360 <li>The existence of <i>prompt</i> tells LILO to show you whatever is referenced in the message line. 1363 <li>The existence of <i>prompt</i> tells LILO to show you whatever is referenced in the message line.
1361 While it is not recommended that you remove the prompt line, if you do remove it, you can still 1364 While it is not recommended that you remove the prompt line, if you do remove it, you can still
1362 get a prompt by holding down the [Shift] key while your machine starts to boot. </li> 1365 get a prompt by holding down the [Shift] key while your machine starts to boot. </li>
1363 <li><i>timeout=50</i> sets the amount of time that LILO will wait for user input before proceeding 1366 <li><i>timeout=50</i> sets the amount of time that LILO will wait for user input before proceeding
1364 with booting the default line entry. This is measured in tenths of a second, with 50 as the default. </li> 1367 with booting the default line entry. This is measured in tenths of a second, with 50 as the default. </li>
1365 <li><i>message=/boot/message</i> refers to the screen that LILO displays to let you select the 1368 <li><i>message=/boot/message</i> refers to the screen that LILO displays to let you select the
1366 operating system or kernel to boot. </li> 1369 operating system or kernel to boot. </li>
1367 <li><i>lba32</i> describes the hard disk geometry to LILO. Another common entry here is linear. You should 1370 <li><i>lba32</i> describes the hard disk geometry to LILO. Another common entry here is linear. You should
1368 not change this line unless you are very aware of what you are doing. Otherwise, you could put 1371 not change this line unless you are very aware of what you are doing. Otherwise, you could put
1369 your system in an unbootable state. </li> 1372 your system in an unbootable state. </li>
1370 <li><i>default=linux</i> refers to the default operating system for LILO to boot from the 1373 <li><i>default=linux</i> refers to the default operating system for LILO to boot from the
1371 options listed below this line. The name linux refers to the label line below in each of the boot options. </li> 1374 options listed below this line. The name linux refers to the label line below in each of the boot options. </li>
1372 <li><i>image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.20</i> specifies the linux kernel to boot with this particular boot option. </li> 1375 <li><i>image=/boot/vmlinuz-2.4.20</i> specifies the linux kernel to boot with this particular boot option. </li>
1373 <li><i>label=linux</i> names the operating system option in the LILO screen. In this case, 1376 <li><i>label=linux</i> names the operating system option in the LILO screen. In this case,
1374 it is also the name referred to by the default line. </li> 1377 it is also the name referred to by the default line. </li>
1375 <li><i>initrd=/boot/initrd-2.4.20.img</i> refers to the initial ram disk image that is used at boot time 1378 <li><i>initrd=/boot/initrd-2.4.20.img</i> refers to the initial ram disk image that is used at boot time
1376 to actually initialize and start the devices that makes booting the kernel possible. The initial 1379 to actually initialize and start the devices that makes booting the kernel possible. The initial
1377 ram disk is a collection of machine-specific drivers necessary to operate a SCSI card, hard drive, or any 1380 ram disk is a collection of machine-specific drivers necessary to operate a SCSI card, hard drive, or any
1378 other device needed to load the kernel. You should never try to share initial ram disks between machines. </li> 1381 other device needed to load the kernel. You should never try to share initial ram disks between machines. </li>
1379 <li><i>read-only</i> specifies that the root partition (see the root line below) is read-only and cannot be 1382 <li><i>read-only</i> specifies that the root partition (see the root line below) is read-only and cannot be
1380 altered during the boot process. </li> 1383 altered during the boot process. </li>
1381 <li><i>root=/dev/hda5</i> tells LILO what disk partition to use as the root partition. </li> 1384 <li><i>root=/dev/hda5</i> tells LILO what disk partition to use as the root partition. </li>
1385 </ul>
1382 <note>Thanks to <uri link="http://www.redhat.com">Redhat.com</uri> for this information. 1386 <note>Thanks to <uri link="http://www.redhat.com">Redhat.com</uri> for this information.
1383 </note> 1387 </note>
1384 <p>After you have edited your <i>lilo.conf</i> file, it is time to run LILO to load the information 1388 <p>After you have edited your <i>lilo.conf</i> file, it is time to run LILO to load the information
1385 into the MBR: 1389 into the MBR:
1386 </p> 1390 </p>
1387 <pre caption="Running LILO"> 1391 <pre caption="Running LILO">
1388# <c>/sbin/lilo</c> 1392# <c>/sbin/lilo</c>
1389 </pre> 1393 </pre>
1390 <p>LILO is configured, and now your machine is ready to boot into Gentoo Linux! 1394 <p>LILO is configured, and now your machine is ready to boot into Gentoo Linux!
1391 </p> 1395 </p>
1392 </body> 1396 </body>
1393 </section> 1397 </section>
1394 </chapter> 1398 </chapter>
1395 <chapter> 1399 <chapter>
1396 <title>Final steps: Bootdisks</title> 1400 <title>Final steps: Bootdisks</title>

Legend:
Removed from v.1.51  
changed lines
  Added in v.1.52

  ViewVC Help
Powered by ViewVC 1.1.20