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74 your base system will have the optimization settings that we chose for you. Since major 74 your base system will have the optimization settings that we chose for you. Since major
75 releases of Gentoo Linux have stage3's specifically optimized for various popular processors, 75 releases of Gentoo Linux have stage3's specifically optimized for various popular processors,
76 this may be sufficient for you. <b>If you're installing Gentoo Linux for the first time, consider 76 this may be sufficient for you. <b>If you're installing Gentoo Linux for the first time, consider
77 using a stage3 tarball for installation.</b></p> 77 using a stage3 tarball for installation.</b></p>
78 78
79 79
80 <p> So, how does one begin the install process? First, you will want to decide which one of our LiveCD ISO images to grab from 80 <p> So, how does one begin the install process? First, you will want to decide which one of our LiveCD ISO images to grab from
81<uri>http://www.ibiblio.org/gentoo/releases/1.4_rc3/x86/</uri> . 81<uri>http://www.ibiblio.org/gentoo/releases/1.4_rc3/x86/</uri> .
82</p> 82</p>
83 <p> The LiveCDs are full CD images that should be burned to a CDR or CD-RW 83 <p> The LiveCDs are full CD images that should be burned to a CDR or CD-RW
84using CD burning software. Currently, we have two types of LiveCDs. The first 84using CD burning software. Currently, we have two types of LiveCDs. The first
85carries the &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; label, and is approximately 40MB in size, contains only the stage 1 tarball and lives 85carries the &quot;gentoo-basic&quot; label, and is approximately 40MB in size, contains only the stage 1 tarball and lives
86in the <path>x86/livecd/</path> directory. This LiveCD is of minimal size to 86in the <path>x86/livecd/</path> directory. This LiveCD is of minimal size to
87allow for a initial quick download and contains a stage1 tarball that can be 87allow for a initial quick download and contains a stage1 tarball that can be
88found in <path>/mnt/cdrom/gentoo/</path> after the CD has booted.</p> 88found in <path>/mnt/cdrom/gentoo/</path> after the CD has booted.</p>
89 <p>The second flavor of LiveCD we currently offer is labelled &quot;gentoo-3stages.&quot; 89 <p>The second flavor of LiveCD we currently offer is labeled &quot;gentoo-3stages.&quot;
90This CD is also found in <path>x86/livecd</path>. It 90This CD is also found in <path>x86/livecd</path>. It
91contains stage 1, 2 and 3 tarballs. Using this LiveCD, it will be possible 91contains stage 1, 2 and 3 tarballs. Using this LiveCD, it will be possible
92for you to install a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system very quickly.</p> 92for you to install a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system very quickly.</p>
93<p><b>What happened to i686, pentium3, athlon, athlon-mp stages, LiveCDs and GRP (Gentoo Reference Platform)?</b> 93<p><b>What happened to i686, pentium3, athlon, athlon-mp stages, LiveCDs and GRP (Gentoo Reference Platform)?</b>
94Gentoo 1.4_rc3 is meant to be a minimal release canidate only. 1.4_rc4 will contain all the usual x86 architectures and GRP. If you want to install stages optimized for these other x86 architectures or GRP, use the 1.4_rc2 documentation, which can be found at <uri>http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-x86-1.4_rc2-install.xml</uri> 94Gentoo 1.4_rc3 is meant to be a minimal release candidate only. 1.4_rc4 will contain all the usual x86 architectures and GRP. If you want to install stages optimized for these other x86 architectures or GRP, use the 1.4_rc2 documentation, which can be found at <uri>http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-x86-1.4_rc2-install.xml</uri>
95</p> 95</p>
96 <impo>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish to 96 <impo>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish to
97report it as a bug, report it to <uri>http://bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug 97report it as a bug, report it to <uri>http://bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug
98needs to be sent upstream to the original software developers (eg the KDE team) the 98needs to be sent upstream to the original software developers (eg the KDE team) the
99<e>Gentoo Linux developers</e> will take care of that for you. 99<e>Gentoo Linux developers</e> will take care of that for you.
100</impo> 100</impo>
101 <p>Now, let us quickly review the install process. First, we will download, burn 101 <p>Now, let us quickly review the install process. First, we will download, burn
102and boot a LiveCD. After getting a root prompt, we will create partitions, create 102and boot a LiveCD. After getting a root prompt, we will create partitions, create
103our filesystems, and extract either a stage1, stage2 or stage3 tarball. If we 103our filesystems, and extract either a stage1, stage2 or stage3 tarball. If we
104are using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, we will take the appropriate steps to get 104are using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, we will take the appropriate steps to get
105our system to stage3. Once our system is at stage3, we can configure it 105our system to stage3. Once our system is at stage3, we can configure it
106(customize configuration files, install a bootloader, etc) and boot it and have a 106(customize configuration files, install a boot loader, etc) and boot it and have a
107fully-functional Gentoo Linux system. Depending on what stage of the build 107fully-functional Gentoo Linux system. Depending on what stage of the build
108process you're starting from, here is what is required for installation: </p> 108process you're starting from, here is what is required for installation: </p>
109 <table> 109 <table>
110 <tr> 110 <tr>
111 <th>stage tarball</th> 111 <th>stage tarball</th>
112 <th>requirements for installation</th> 112 <th>requirements for installation</th>
113 </tr> 113 </tr>
114 <tr> 114 <tr>
115 <ti>1</ti> 115 <ti>1</ti>
116 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, bootstrap, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti> 116 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, bootstrap, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti>
117 </tr> 117 </tr>
118 <tr> 118 <tr>
119 <ti>2</ti> 119 <ti>2</ti>
120 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti> 120 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti>
121 </tr> 121 </tr>
129 </chapter> 129 </chapter>
130 <chapter> 130 <chapter>
131 <title>Booting</title> 131 <title>Booting</title>
132 <section> 132 <section>
133 <body> 133 <body>
134 <p>Start by booting the LiveCD. You should see a fancy boot screen 134 <p>Start by booting the LiveCD. You should see a fancy boot screen
135 with the Gentoo Linux logo on it. At this screen, you can hit Enter to begin the boot process, 135 with the Gentoo Linux logo on it. At this screen, you can hit Enter to begin the boot process,
136 or boot the LiveCD with custom boot options by typing <c>gentoo opt1 opt2</c> and then hitting Enter. To see 136 or boot the LiveCD with custom boot options by typing <c>gentoo opt1 opt2</c> and then hitting Enter. To see
137 a detailed description of available boot options, press F2 to view the help screen.</p> 137 a detailed description of available boot options, press F2 to view the help screen.</p>
138 138
139 <p> Once you hit Enter, you will be greeted with the standard kernel 139 <p> Once you hit Enter, you will be greeted with the standard kernel
140booting output, kernel and initrd messages, followed by the normal Gentoo 140booting output, kernel and initrd messages, followed by the normal Gentoo
141Linux boot sequence. You will be automatically logged in as 141Linux boot sequence. You will be automatically logged in as
142&quot;<c>root</c>&quot; and the root password will be set to a random string 142&quot;<c>root</c>&quot; and the root password will be set to a random string
143for security purposes. You should have a root (&quot;<c>#</c>&quot;) prompt 143for security purposes. You should have a root (&quot;<c>#</c>&quot;) prompt
144on the current console, and can also swith to other consoles by pressing 144on the current console, and can also switch to other consoles by pressing
145Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you started on by pressing 145Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you started on by pressing
146Alt-F1. At this point you should set the root password, type passwd and 146Alt-F1. At this point you should set the root password, type passwd and
147follow the prompts. 147follow the prompts.
148 </p> 148 </p>
149 <p>You've probably also noticed that above your <c>#</c> prompt is a bunch of help text 149 <p>You've probably also noticed that above your <c>#</c> prompt is a bunch of help text
150 that explains how to do things like configure your Linux networking and telling you where you can find 150 that explains how to do things like configure your Linux networking and telling you where you can find
151 the Gentoo Linux stage tarballs and packages on your CD. 151 the Gentoo Linux stage tarballs and packages on your CD.
152 </p> 152 </p>
153 </body> 153 </body>
154 </section> 154 </section>
155 </chapter> 155 </chapter>
156 <chapter> 156 <chapter>
157 <title>Load Kernel Modules</title> 157 <title>Load Kernel Modules</title>
158 <section> 158 <section>
159 <body> 159 <body>
337 <title>Proxy Configuration</title> 337 <title>Proxy Configuration</title>
338 <body> 338 <body>
339 <p>If you are behind a proxy, it is necessary to configure your proxy before 339 <p>If you are behind a proxy, it is necessary to configure your proxy before
340 you continue. We will export some variables to set up the proxy accordingly. 340 you continue. We will export some variables to set up the proxy accordingly.
341 </p> 341 </p>
342 <pre caption="Setting a Proxy"> 342 <pre caption="Setting a Proxy">
343# <c>export http_proxy=&quot;machine.company.com:1234&quot; </c> 343# <c>export http_proxy=&quot;machine.company.com:1234&quot; </c>
344# <c>export ftp_proxy=&quot;$http_proxy&quot; </c> 344# <c>export ftp_proxy=&quot;$http_proxy&quot; </c>
345# <c>export RSYNC_PROXY=&quot;$http_proxy&quot; </c> 345# <c>export RSYNC_PROXY=&quot;$http_proxy&quot; </c>
346 </pre> 346 </pre>
347 </body> 347 </body>
348 </section> 348 </section>
349 <section> 349 <section>
350 <title>Networking is go!</title> 350 <title>Networking is go!</title>
351 <body> 351 <body>
352 <p>Networking should now be configured and useable. You should be able to use the included 352 <p>Networking should now be configured and usable. You should be able to use the included
353 <c>ssh</c>, <c>scp</c>, <c>lynx</c>, <c>irssi</c> and <c>wget</c> commands to connect to other machines on your LAN or the Internet.</p> 353 <c>ssh</c>, <c>scp</c>, <c>lynx</c>, <c>irssi</c> and <c>wget</c> commands to connect to other machines on your LAN or the Internet.</p>
354 </body> 354 </body>
355 </section> 355 </section>
356 </chapter> 356 </chapter>
357 <chapter> 357 <chapter>
358 <title>Partition Configuration</title> 358 <title>Partition Configuration</title>
359 <section> 359 <section>
360 <body> 360 <body>
361 <p>Now that the kernel can see the network card and disk controllers, it is time 361 <p>Now that the kernel can see the network card and disk controllers, it is time
362 to set up disk partitions for Gentoo Linux. 362 to set up disk partitions for Gentoo Linux.
363 </p> 363 </p>
364 364
365 <p>Here is a quick overview of the standard Gentoo Linux partition layout. 365 <p>Here is a quick overview of the standard Gentoo Linux partition layout.
366 We're going to create at least three partitions: a swap partition, a root 366 We're going to create at least three partitions: a swap partition, a root
367 partition (to hold the bulk of Gentoo Linux), and a special boot partition. 367 partition (to hold the bulk of Gentoo Linux), and a special boot partition.
427 <note><c>cfdisk</c> is included on the install CD, and it is <i>considerably</i> easier to use than 427 <note><c>cfdisk</c> is included on the install CD, and it is <i>considerably</i> easier to use than
428 <c>fdisk</c>. Just type <c>cfdisk</c> to run it; by default, cfdisk will work with <b>/dev/hda</b>. If /dev/hda is not the hard disk you want to partition, give the right value to cfdisk as a parameter. For example: <c>cfdisk /dev/hde</c></note> 428 <c>fdisk</c>. Just type <c>cfdisk</c> to run it; by default, cfdisk will work with <b>/dev/hda</b>. If /dev/hda is not the hard disk you want to partition, give the right value to cfdisk as a parameter. For example: <c>cfdisk /dev/hde</c></note>
429 <note>If <c>fdisk</c> or <c>cfdisk</c> instruct you to do so, please reboot to allow your system to detect the 429 <note>If <c>fdisk</c> or <c>cfdisk</c> instruct you to do so, please reboot to allow your system to detect the
430new partition configuration.</note> 430new partition configuration.</note>
431 <note>If you are using RAID your partitions will be a little different. You 431 <note>If you are using RAID your partitions will be a little different. You
432will have the partitions like this: <path>/dev/ataraid/discX/partY</path> X are 432will have the partitions like this: <path>/dev/ataraid/discX/partY</path> X are
433the arrays you have made, so if you only have made 1 array, then it will be 433the arrays you have made, so if you only have made 1 array, then it will be
434disc0.Y is the partition number as in <path>/dev/hdaY</path> </note> 434disc0.Y is the partition number as in <path>/dev/hdaY</path> </note>
435 <p>Once you've created your partitions, it is time to initialize 435 <p>Once you've created your partitions, it is time to initialize
436 the filesystems that will be used to house your data.</p> 436 the filesystems that will be used to house your data.</p>
437 437
438 <p>But before creating filesystems, you may want to initialize the 438 <p>But before creating filesystems, you may want to initialize the
439 beginning of your hard disk using <c>dd</c> if you are using a pre-existing partition that has been used before. 439 beginning of your hard disk using <c>dd</c> if you are using a pre-existing partition that has been used before.
440 This is particularly helpful when you're going to create a new XFS filesystem on a partition that previously contained 440 This is particularly helpful when you're going to create a new XFS filesystem on a partition that previously contained
441 a ReiserFS filesystem. Doing this will ensure that your new filesystem 441 a ReiserFS filesystem. Doing this will ensure that your new filesystem
442 will not be mis-indentified by Linux's filesystem auto-detection code. 442 will not be mis-identified by Linux's filesystem auto-detection code.
443 This can be done as follows: 443 This can be done as follows:
444 </p> 444 </p>
445 <pre caption="Initializing first 1024 Sectors of HD"> 445 <pre caption="Initializing first 1024 Sectors of HD">
446# <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdxy bs=1K count=1</c> 446# <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdxy bs=1K count=1</c>
447<comment>Replace /dev/hdxy with the device you wish to &quot;clean.&quot;</comment> 447<comment>Replace /dev/hdxy with the device you wish to &quot;clean.&quot;</comment>
448 </pre> 448 </pre>
449 <warn>The command above will destroy all data from <path>/dev/hdxy</path>. 449 <warn>The command above will destroy all data from <path>/dev/hdxy</path>.
450 Be careful and check twice which partition you specify for zeroing. 450 Be careful and check twice which partition you specify for zeroing.
451 If you make a mistake it might result in a loss of data. 451 If you make a mistake it might result in a loss of data.
452 </warn> 452 </warn>
453 <p>Now, initialize your swap partition as follows:</p> 453 <p>Now, initialize your swap partition as follows:</p>
454 <pre caption="Initializing Swap"> 454 <pre caption="Initializing Swap">
455# <c>mkswap /dev/hda2</c> 455# <c>mkswap /dev/hda2</c>
456 </pre> 456 </pre>
457 <p>You can use the <c>mke2fs</c> command to create ext2 filesystems.</p> 457 <p>You can use the <c>mke2fs</c> command to create ext2 filesystems.</p>
458 <pre caption="Creating an ext2 Filesystem"> 458 <pre caption="Creating an ext2 Filesystem">
459# <i>mke2fs /dev/hda1</i> 459# <i>mke2fs /dev/hda1</i>
460 </pre> 460 </pre>
461 <p>To create an XFS filesystem, use the <c>mkfs.xfs</c> command.</p> 461 <p>To create an XFS filesystem, use the <c>mkfs.xfs</c> command.</p>
462 <pre caption="Creating a XFS Filesystem"> 462 <pre caption="Creating a XFS Filesystem">
463# <c>mkfs.xfs /dev/hda3</c> 463# <c>mkfs.xfs /dev/hda3</c>
464 </pre> 464 </pre>
465 <note> 465 <note>
466 You may want to add a couple of additional flags to the <c>mkfs.xfs</c> command: <c>-d agcount=3 -l size=32m</c>. 466 You may want to add a couple of additional flags to the <c>mkfs.xfs</c> command: <c>-d agcount=3 -l size=32m</c>.
467 The <c>-d agcount=3</c> command will lower 467 The <c>-d agcount=3</c> command will lower
468 the number of allocation groups. XFS will insist on using at least 1 allocation group per 4 GB of your partition, 468 the number of allocation groups. XFS will insist on using at least 1 allocation group per 4 GB of your partition,
469 so, for example, if you hava a 20 GB partition you will need a minimum agcount of 5. 469 so, for example, if you have a 20 GB partition you will need a minimum agcount of 5.
470 The <c>-l size=32m</c> command increases the journal size to 32 Mb, increasing performance. 470 The <c>-l size=32m</c> command increases the journal size to 32 Mb, increasing performance.
471 </note> 471 </note>
472 <p>If you would like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using <c>mke2fs -j</c>.</p> 472 <p>If you would like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using <c>mke2fs -j</c>.</p>
473 <pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem"> 473 <pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem">
474# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c> 474# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c>
475 </pre> 475 </pre>
476 <note>You can find out more about using ext3 under Linux 2.4 at 476 <note>You can find out more about using ext3 under Linux 2.4 at
477 <uri>http://www.zip.com.au/~akpm/linux/ext3/ext3-usage.html</uri>. 477 <uri>http://www.zip.com.au/~akpm/linux/ext3/ext3-usage.html</uri>.
478 </note> 478 </note>
479 <p>To create ReiserFS filesystems, use the <c>mkreiserfs</c> command.</p> 479 <p>To create ReiserFS filesystems, use the <c>mkreiserfs</c> command.</p>
480 <pre caption="Creating a ReiserFS Filesystem"> 480 <pre caption="Creating a ReiserFS Filesystem">
481# <c>mkreiserfs /dev/hda3</c> 481# <c>mkreiserfs /dev/hda3</c>
482 </pre> 482 </pre>
483 483
484 <p>To create JFS filesystems, use the <c>mkfs.jfs</c> comamnd.</p> 484 <p>To create JFS filesystems, use the <c>mkfs.jfs</c> command.</p>
485 <pre caption="Creating a JFS Filesystem"> 485 <pre caption="Creating a JFS Filesystem">
486# <c>mkfs.jfs /dev/hda3</c> 486# <c>mkfs.jfs /dev/hda3</c>
487 </pre> 487 </pre>
488 488
489 </body> 489 </body>
490 </section> 490 </section>
491 </chapter> 491 </chapter>
492 <chapter> 492 <chapter>
493 <title>Mount Partitions</title> 493 <title>Mount Partitions</title>
494 <section> 494 <section>
495 <body> 495 <body>
496 <p>Now, we will activate our new swap, since we may need the additional virtual memory that it 496 <p>Now, we will activate our new swap, since we may need the additional virtual memory that it
497 provides later: 497 provides later:
498 </p> 498 </p>
499 <pre caption="Activating Swap"> 499 <pre caption="Activating Swap">
500# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c> 500# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c>
501 </pre> 501 </pre>
502 <p>Next, we will create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mount points, 502 <p>Next, we will create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mount points,
503 and we will mount our filesystems to these mountpoints. </p> 503 and we will mount our filesystems to these mount points. </p>
504 <pre caption="Creating Mount Points"> 504 <pre caption="Creating Mount Points">
505# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c> 505# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c>
506# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c> 506# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c>
507# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 507# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
508# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 508# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
509 </pre> 509 </pre>
510 <p> 510 <p>
511 If you are setting up Gentoo 511 If you are setting up Gentoo
512 Linux with a separate <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path>, these would get mounted to 512 Linux with a separate <path>/usr</path> or <path>/var</path>, these would get mounted to
513 <path>/mnt/gentoo/usr</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/var</path>, respectively. 513 <path>/mnt/gentoo/usr</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/var</path>, respectively.
514 </p> 514 </p>
515 <impo>If your <e>boot</e> partition (the one holding the kernel) is ReiserFS, be sure to mount it 515 <impo>If your <e>boot</e> partition (the one holding the kernel) is ReiserFS, be sure to mount it
516 with the <c>-o notail</c> option so GRUB gets properly installed. Make sure 516 with the <c>-o notail</c> option so GRUB gets properly installed. Make sure
517 that <c>notail</c> ends up in your new <path>/etc/fstab</path> boot partition entry, too. 517 that <c>notail</c> ends up in your new <path>/etc/fstab</path> boot partition entry, too.
518 We will get to that in a bit. 518 We will get to that in a bit.
651 interested in customizing USE settings, look in <path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path>. 651 interested in customizing USE settings, look in <path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path>.
652 If you want to turn off any USE settings found here, add an appropriate <c>USE=&quot;-foo&quot;</c> 652 If you want to turn off any USE settings found here, add an appropriate <c>USE=&quot;-foo&quot;</c>
653 in /etc/make.conf (to turn off the <c>foo</c> USE setting.) 653 in /etc/make.conf (to turn off the <c>foo</c> USE setting.)
654 </note> 654 </note>
655 </body> 655 </body>
656 </section> 656 </section>
657 </chapter> 657 </chapter>
658 <chapter> 658 <chapter>
659 <title>Setting your time zone and date</title> 659 <title>Setting your time zone and date</title>
660 <section> 660 <section>
661 <body> 661 <body>
662 <p>You need to set your time zone and date before you start installing your system.</p> 662 <p>You need to set your time zone and date before you start installing your system.</p>
663 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time) in 663 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time) in
664 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link by typing: 664 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link by typing:
665 </p> 665 </p>
666 <pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for time zome"> 666 <pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for time zone">
667# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c> 667# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c>
668# <c>date</c> 668# <c>date</c>
669Thu Feb 27 09:04:42 CST 2003 669Thu Feb 27 09:04:42 CST 2003
670<comment>(If your date is wrong set your date with this next command)</comment> 670<comment>(If your date is wrong set your date with this next command)</comment>
671# <c>date 022709042003</c> 671# <c>date 022709042003</c>
672<comment>(date MMDDhhmmCCYY)</comment> 672<comment>(date MMDDhhmmCCYY)</comment>
673 673
674 </pre> 674 </pre>
675 675
676 </body> 676 </body>
677 </section> 677 </section>
678 </chapter> 678 </chapter>
679 <chapter> 679 <chapter>
680 <title>Starting from Stage1</title> 680 <title>Starting from Stage1</title>
681 <section> 681 <section>
999 The first file we need to 999 The first file we need to
1000 configure is <path>/etc/fstab</path>. Remember that you should use 1000 configure is <path>/etc/fstab</path>. Remember that you should use
1001 the <c>notail</c> option for your boot partition if you chose to create a ReiserFS filesystem on it. 1001 the <c>notail</c> option for your boot partition if you chose to create a ReiserFS filesystem on it.
1002 Remember to specify <c>ext2</c>, <c>ext3</c> or <c>reiserfs</c> filesystem types as appropriate. 1002 Remember to specify <c>ext2</c>, <c>ext3</c> or <c>reiserfs</c> filesystem types as appropriate.
1003 </p> 1003 </p>
1004 <p>Use something like the <path>/etc/fstab</path> listed below, but of course be sure to replace &quot;BOOT&quot;, 1004 <p>Use something like the <path>/etc/fstab</path> listed below, but of course be sure to replace &quot;BOOT&quot;,
1005 &quot;ROOT&quot; and &quot;SWAP&quot; with the actual block devices you are using (such as <c>hda1</c>, etc.)</p> 1005 &quot;ROOT&quot; and &quot;SWAP&quot; with the actual block devices you are using (such as <c>hda1</c>, etc.)</p>
1006 <pre caption="Editing fstab"><comment> 1006 <pre caption="Editing fstab"><comment>
1007# /etc/fstab: static file system information. 1007# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
1008# 1008#
1009# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't 1009# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't
1010# needed; notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage 1010# needed; notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage
1011# efficiency). It is safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to 1011# efficiency). It is safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to
1012# switch between notail and tail freely. 1012# switch between notail and tail freely.
1013 1013
1014# &lt;fs&gt; &lt;mountpoint&gt; &lt;type&gt; &lt;opts&gt; &lt;dump/pass&gt; 1014# &lt;fs&gt; &lt;mount point&gt; &lt;type&gt; &lt;opts&gt; &lt;dump/pass&gt;
1015 1015
1016# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts. 1016# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts.
1017</comment> 1017</comment>
1018/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2 1018/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2
1019/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1 1019/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1
1020/dev/SWAP none swap sw 0 0 1020/dev/SWAP none swap sw 0 0
1021/dev/cdroms/cdrom0 /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,ro 0 0 1021/dev/cdroms/cdrom0 /mnt/cdrom iso9660 noauto,ro 0 0
1022proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 1022proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
1023 </pre> 1023 </pre>
1024 <warn>Please notice that <i>/boot</i> is NOT mounted at boot time. 1024 <warn>Please notice that <i>/boot</i> is NOT mounted at boot time.
1025 This is to protect the data in <i>/boot</i> from 1025 This is to protect the data in <i>/boot</i> from
1026 corruption. If you need to access <i>/boot</i>, please mount it! 1026 corruption. If you need to access <i>/boot</i>, please mount it!
1027 </warn> 1027 </warn>
1028 </body> 1028 </body>
1029 </section> 1029 </section>

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