/[gentoo]/xml/htdocs/doc/en/gentoo-x86-install.xml
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537/dev/hda3 82 3876 28690200 83 Linux 537/dev/hda3 82 3876 28690200 83 Linux
538 538
539Command (m for help): 539Command (m for help):
540</pre> 540</pre>
541 541
542<p>In our suggested "newbie" partition configuration, we have three partitions. 542<p>In our suggested "newbie" partition configuration, we have three partitions.
543The first one (<c>/dev/hda1</c>) at the beginning of the disk is a small 543The first one (<c>/dev/hda1</c>) at the beginning of the disk is a small
544partition called a boot partition. The boot partition's purpose is to hold all 544partition called a boot partition. The boot partition's purpose is to hold all
545the critical data related to booting -- GRUB boot loader information (if you 545the critical data related to booting -- GRUB boot loader information (if you
546will be using GRUB) as well as your Linux kernel(s). The boot partition gives 546will be using GRUB) as well as your Linux kernel(s). The boot partition gives
547us a safe place to store everything related to booting Linux. During normal 547us a safe place to store everything related to booting Linux. During normal
548day-to-day Gentoo Linux use, your boot partition should remain <e>unmounted</e> 548day-to-day Gentoo Linux use, your boot partition should remain <e>unmounted</e>
549for safety. If you are setting up a SCSI system, your boot partition will 549for safety. If you are setting up a SCSI system, your boot partition will
550likely end up being <c>/dev/sda1</c>.</p> 550likely end up being <c>/dev/sda1</c>.</p>
551 551
552<p>It's recommended to have boot partitions (containing everything necessary for
553the boot loader to work) at the beginning of the disk. While not necessarily
554required anymore, it is a useful tradition from the days when the lilo boot
555loader wasn't able to load kernels from filesystems that extended beyond disk
556cylinder 1024.
557</p>
558
552<p>The second partition (<c>/dev/hda2</c>) is used to for swap space. The 559<p>The second partition (<c>/dev/hda2</c>) is used to for swap space. The
553kernel uses swap space as virtual memory when RAM becomes low. This partition, 560kernel uses swap space as virtual memory when RAM becomes low. This partition,
554relatively speaking, isn't very big either, typically somewhere around 512MB. 561relatively speaking, isn't very big either, typically somewhere around 512MB.
555If you're setting up a SCSI system, this partition will likely end up 562If you're setting up a SCSI system, this partition will likely end up
556being called <c>/dev/sda2</c>. </p> 563being called <c>/dev/sda2</c>. </p>
557 564
558<p>The third partition (<c>/dev/hda3</c>) is quite large and takes up the rest 565<p>The third partition (<c>/dev/hda3</c>) is quite large and takes up the rest
559of the disk. This partition is called our "root" partition and will be used to 566of the disk. This partition is called our "root" partition and will be used to
560store your main filesystem that houses Gentoo Linux itself. On a SCSI system, 567store your main filesystem that houses Gentoo Linux itself. On a SCSI system,
561this partition would likely end up being <c>/dev/sda3</c>.</p> 568this partition would likely end up being <c>/dev/sda3</c>.</p>
562 569
563 570
564<p>Before we partition the disk, here's a quick technical overview of the 571<p>Before we partition the disk, here's a quick technical overview of the
565suggested partition and filesystem configuration to use when installing Gentoo 572suggested partition and filesystem configuration to use when installing Gentoo
566Linux:</p> 573Linux:</p>
805 <warn>The command above will destroy all data from <path>/dev/hda3</path>. 812 <warn>The command above will destroy all data from <path>/dev/hda3</path>.
806 Be careful and check twice which partition you specify for zeroing. 813 Be careful and check twice which partition you specify for zeroing.
807 If you make a mistake it might result in a loss of data. 814 If you make a mistake it might result in a loss of data.
808 </warn> 815 </warn>
809--> 816-->
810 817
811<p>Based on our example above, we will use the following commands to initialize 818<p>Based on our example above, we will use the following commands to initialize
812all our partitions for use:</p> 819all our partitions for use:</p>
813 820
814<pre caption="Initializing our partitions (example)"> 821<pre caption="Initializing our partitions (example)">
815# mke2fs -j /dev/hda1 822# mke2fs -j /dev/hda1
816# mkswap /dev/hda2 823# mkswap /dev/hda2
817# mkreiserfs /dev/hda3 824# mkreiserfs /dev/hda3
818</pre> 825</pre>
819 826
820<p>We choose ext3 for our <c>/dev/hda1</c> boot partition because it is a robust journaling 827<p>We choose ext3 for our <c>/dev/hda1</c> boot partition because it is a
821filesystem supported by all major boot loaders. We used <c>mkswap</c> for our <c>/dev/hda2 828robust journaling filesystem supported by all major boot loaders. We used
822</c> swap partition -- the choice is obvious here. And for our main root filesystem on 829<c>mkswap</c> for our <c>/dev/hda2 </c> swap partition -- the choice is obvious
823<c>/dev/hda3</c> we choose ReiserFS, since it is a solid journaling filesystem offering excellent 830here. And for our main root filesystem on <c>/dev/hda3</c> we choose ReiserFS,
824performance. Now, go ahead and initialize your partitions. Here are the various commands 831since it is a solid journaling filesystem offering excellent performance. Now,
825available to create various filesystem types:</p> 832go ahead and initialize your partitions.</p>
833
834<p>For your reference, here are the various <c>mkfs</c>-like commands available
835during the installation process:</p>
826 836
827 <p><c>mkswap</c> is the command that is used to initialize swap partitions:</p> 837 <p><c>mkswap</c> is the command that is used to initialize swap partitions:</p>
828<pre caption="Initializing Swap"> 838<pre caption="Initializing Swap">
829# <c>mkswap /dev/hda2</c> 839# <c>mkswap /dev/hda2</c>
830</pre> 840</pre>
831<p>You can use the <c>mke2fs</c> command to create ext2 filesystems:</p> 841<p>You can use the <c>mke2fs</c> command to create ext2 filesystems:</p>
832<pre caption="Creating an ext2 Filesystem"> 842<pre caption="Creating an ext2 Filesystem">
833# <i>mke2fs /dev/hda1</i> 843# <i>mke2fs /dev/hda1</i>
834</pre> 844</pre>
835<p>If you would like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using 845<p>If you would like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using
836 <c>mke2fs -j</c>:</p> 846 <c>mke2fs -j</c>:</p>
837<pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem"> 847<pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem">
838# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c> 848# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c>
839</pre> 849</pre>
840 <note>You can find out more about using ext3 under Linux 2.4 at 850 <note>You can find out more about using ext3 under Linux 2.4 at

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