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49 Linux 1.4_rc4. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 49 Linux 1.4_rc4. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
50 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 50 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
51 scratch. 51 scratch.
52 </abstract> 52 </abstract>
53<version>2.6.1</version> 53<version>2.6.1</version>
54 <date>2nd of July 2003</date> 54 <date>4th of July 2003</date>
55 <chapter> 55 <chapter>
56 <title>About the Install</title> 56 <title>About the Install</title>
57 <section> 57 <section>
58 <body> 58 <body>
59 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 59 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
1097<path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path> isn't available: ignore it. We are 1097<path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path> isn't available: ignore it. We are
1098going to issue <c>emerge sync</c> later on in this document which will resolve 1098going to issue <c>emerge sync</c> later on in this document which will resolve
1099the problem. 1099the problem.
1100</note> 1100</note>
1101 1101
1102<note>
1103Hardware RAID users who want to use GRUB should run <c>mount -o bind /dev
1104/mnt/gentoo/dev</c> before chrooting.
1105</note>
1106
1102<pre caption="Prepping and entering the chroot environment"> 1107<pre caption="Prepping and entering the chroot environment">
1103# <c>mount -t proc proc /mnt/gentoo/proc</c> 1108# <c>mount -t proc proc /mnt/gentoo/proc</c>
1104# <c>cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf</c> 1109# <c>cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf</c>
1105# <c>chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash</c> 1110# <c>chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash</c>
1106# <c>env-update</c> 1111# <c>env-update</c>
1640<pre caption="Hosts Template"> 1645<pre caption="Hosts Template">
1641127.0.0.1 localhost 1646127.0.0.1 localhost
1642<comment># the next line contains your IP for your local LAN, and your associated machine name</comment> 1647<comment># the next line contains your IP for your local LAN, and your associated machine name</comment>
1643192.168.1.1 mymachine.mydomain.com mymachine 1648192.168.1.1 mymachine.mydomain.com mymachine
1644</pre> 1649</pre>
1645 <note>If you are on a DHCP network, it might be helpful to set <i>localhost</i> to your machine's 1650 <note>If you are on a DHCP network, it might be helpful to add your
1646 actual hostname. This will help GNOME and many other programs in name resolution. 1651 machine's actual hostname after <i>localhost</i>. This will help
1652 GNOME and many other programs in name resolution.
1647 </note> 1653 </note>
1648 </body> 1654 </body>
1649 </section> 1655 </section>
1650 </chapter> 1656 </chapter>
1651 <chapter> 1657 <chapter>
1652 <title>Final Network Configuration</title> 1658 <title>Final Network Configuration</title>
1758 <p>The easiest way to install GRUB is to simply type <c>grub</c> at your chrooted shell prompt: </p> 1764 <p>The easiest way to install GRUB is to simply type <c>grub</c> at your chrooted shell prompt: </p>
1759<pre caption="Installing GRUB"> 1765<pre caption="Installing GRUB">
1760# <c>emerge grub</c> 1766# <c>emerge grub</c>
1761# <c>grub</c> 1767# <c>grub</c>
1762</pre> 1768</pre>
1763 <impo>If you are using hardware RAID this part will not work at
1764 this time.
1765 Skip to the section on making your <path>grub.conf</path>. After that we will complete the
1766 grub setup for RAID controllers
1767 </impo>
1768 <p>You will be presented with the <c>grub&gt;</c> grub 1769 <p>You will be presented with the <c>grub&gt;</c> grub
1769 command-line prompt. Now, you need to type in the 1770 command-line prompt. Now, you need to type in the
1770 right commands to install the GRUB boot record onto your hard drive. In my example configuration, 1771 right commands to install the GRUB boot record onto your hard drive. In my example configuration,
1771 I want to install the GRUB boot record on my hard drive's MBR (master boot record), so that 1772 I want to install the GRUB boot record on my hard drive's MBR (master boot record), so that
1772 the first thing I see when I turn on the computer is the GRUB prompt. In my case, the commands 1773 the first thing I see when I turn on the computer is the GRUB prompt. In my case, the commands
1782<comment>Alternatively, if you wanted to install the bootloader somewhere other than the MBR</comment> 1783<comment>Alternatively, if you wanted to install the bootloader somewhere other than the MBR</comment>
1783grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> <codenote>Your boot partition</codenote> 1784grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> <codenote>Your boot partition</codenote>
1784grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0,4)</c> <codenote>Where the boot record is installed, here it is /dev/hda5</codenote> 1785grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0,4)</c> <codenote>Where the boot record is installed, here it is /dev/hda5</codenote>
1785grub&gt; <c>quit</c> 1786grub&gt; <c>quit</c>
1786</pre> 1787</pre>
1787 1788
1789<p>
1790Hardware RAID users will have to add <c>--stage2=/boot/grub/stage2</c> to
1791the <c>setup</c> command:
1792</p>
1793
1794<pre caption = "GRUB on hardware RAID">
1795grub&lt; <i>root (hd0,0)</i>
1796grub&lt; <i>setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0)</i>
1797grub&lt; <i>quit</i>
1798</pre>
1799
1788 <p>Here is how the two commands work. The first <c>root ( )</c> command tells GRUB 1800 <p>Here is how the two commands work. The first <c>root ( )</c> command tells GRUB
1789 the location of your boot partition (in our example, <path>/dev/hda1</path> or 1801 the location of your boot partition (in our example, <path>/dev/hda1</path> or
1790 <path>(hd0,0)</path> in GRUB terminology. Then, the second <c>setup ( ) 1802 <path>(hd0,0)</path> in GRUB terminology. Then, the second <c>setup ( )
1791 </c> command tells GRUB where to install the 1803 </c> command tells GRUB where to install the
1792 boot record - it will be configured to look for its special files at the <c>root 1804 boot record - it will be configured to look for its special files at the <c>root
1941 <section> 1953 <section>
1942 <title>GRUB Bootdisks</title> 1954 <title>GRUB Bootdisks</title>
1943 <body> 1955 <body>
1944 <p>It is always a good idea to make a boot disk the first 1956 <p>It is always a good idea to make a boot disk the first
1945 time you install any Linux distribution. This is a security 1957 time you install any Linux distribution. This is a security
1946 blanket, and generally not a bad thing to do. If you are using some kinds of hardware RAID, or your hardware doesn't let you install a working bootloader from the chrooted environment, you may <e>need</e> to make a GRUB boot 1958 blanket, and generally not a bad thing to do. If your hardware doesn't
1947 disk. With these types of hardware RAID or systems, 1959 let you install a working bootloader from the chrooted environment,
1948 if you try to install grub from your chrooted shell it will fail. If you are in this camp, 1960 you may <e>need</e> to make a GRUB boot disk.
1949 make a GRUB 1961 If you are in this camp, make a GRUB boot disk, and when you reboot
1950 boot disk, and when you reboot the first time you can install GRUB 1962 the first time you can install GRUB to the MBR. Make your bootdisks
1951 to the MBR. Make your 1963 like this:
1952 bootdisks like this:
1953 </p> 1964 </p>
1954<pre caption="Creating a GRUB Bootdisk"> 1965<pre caption="Creating a GRUB Bootdisk">
1955# <c>cd /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/</c> 1966# <c>cd /usr/share/grub/i386-pc/</c>
1956# <c>cat stage1 stage2 > /dev/fd0</c> 1967# <c>cat stage1 stage2 > /dev/fd0</c>
1957</pre> 1968</pre>
1993 <note> 2004 <note>
1994 After rebooting, it is a good idea to run the <c>update-modules</c> command to create 2005 After rebooting, it is a good idea to run the <c>update-modules</c> command to create
1995 the <path>/etc/modules.conf</path> file. Instead of modifying this file directly, you should 2006 the <path>/etc/modules.conf</path> file. Instead of modifying this file directly, you should
1996 generally make changes to the files in <path>/etc/modules.d</path>. 2007 generally make changes to the files in <path>/etc/modules.d</path>.
1997 </note> 2008 </note>
1998 <impo>Remember if you are running hardware RAID, you must
1999 use the bootdisk for the first reboot.
2000 then go back and install grub the way everyone else did the first
2001 time. You are done -- congratulations!</impo>
2002 <p>If you have any questions or would like to get involved with Gentoo Linux development, 2009 <p>If you have any questions or would like to get involved with Gentoo Linux development,
2003 consider joining our gentoo-user and gentoo-dev mailing lists 2010 consider joining our gentoo-user and gentoo-dev mailing lists
2004 (more information on our <uri link="http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/lists.xml">mailing lists</uri> page). 2011 (more information on our <uri link="http://www.gentoo.org/main/en/lists.xml">mailing lists</uri> page).
2005 We also have a handy <uri link="http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/desktop.xml">Desktop configuration guide</uri> 2012 We also have a handy <uri link="http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/desktop.xml">Desktop configuration guide</uri>
2006 that will 2013 that will

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