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84using CD burning software. Currently, we have two types of LiveCDs. The first 84using CD burning software. Currently, we have two types of LiveCDs. The first
85carries the "gentoo-basic" label, and is approximately 40MB in size, contains only the stage 1 tarball and lives 85carries the "gentoo-basic" label, and is approximately 40MB in size, contains only the stage 1 tarball and lives
86in the <path>x86/livecd/</path> directory. This LiveCD is of minimal size to 86in the <path>x86/livecd/</path> directory. This LiveCD is of minimal size to
87allow for a initial quick download and contains a stage1 tarball that can be 87allow for a initial quick download and contains a stage1 tarball that can be
88found in <path>/mnt/cdrom/gentoo/</path> after the CD has booted.</p> 88found in <path>/mnt/cdrom/gentoo/</path> after the CD has booted.</p>
89 <p>The second flavor of LiveCD we currently offer is labelled &quot;gentoo-3stages.&quot; 89 <p>The second flavor of LiveCD we currently offer is labeled &quot;gentoo-3stages.&quot;
90This CD is also found in <path>x86/livecd</path>. It 90This CD is also found in <path>x86/livecd</path>. It
91contains stage 1, 2 and 3 tarballs. Using this LiveCD, it will be possible 91contains stage 1, 2 and 3 tarballs. Using this LiveCD, it will be possible
92for you to install a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system very quickly.</p> 92for you to install a fully-functional Gentoo Linux system very quickly.</p>
93<p><b>What happened to i686, pentium3, athlon, athlon-mp stages, LiveCDs and GRP (Gentoo Reference Platform)?</b> 93<p><b>What happened to i686, pentium3, athlon, athlon-mp stages, LiveCDs and GRP (Gentoo Reference Platform)?</b>
94Gentoo 1.4_rc3 is meant to be a minimal release canidate only. 1.4_rc4 will contain all the usual x86 architectures and GRP. If you want to install stages optimized for these other x86 architectures or GRP, use the 1.4_rc2 documentation, which can be found at <uri>http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-x86-1.4_rc2-install.xml</uri> 94Gentoo 1.4_rc3 is meant to be a minimal release candidate only. 1.4_rc4 will contain all the usual x86 architectures and GRP. If you want to install stages optimized for these other x86 architectures or GRP, use the 1.4_rc2 documentation, which can be found at <uri>http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-x86-1.4_rc2-install.xml</uri>
95</p> 95</p>
96 <impo>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish to 96 <impo>If you encounter a problem with any part of the install and wish to
97report it as a bug, report it to <uri>http://bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug 97report it as a bug, report it to <uri>http://bugs.gentoo.org</uri>. If the bug
98needs to be sent upstream to the original software developers (eg the KDE team) the 98needs to be sent upstream to the original software developers (eg the KDE team) the
99<e>Gentoo Linux developers</e> will take care of that for you. 99<e>Gentoo Linux developers</e> will take care of that for you.
101 <p>Now, let us quickly review the install process. First, we will download, burn 101 <p>Now, let us quickly review the install process. First, we will download, burn
102and boot a LiveCD. After getting a root prompt, we will create partitions, create 102and boot a LiveCD. After getting a root prompt, we will create partitions, create
103our filesystems, and extract either a stage1, stage2 or stage3 tarball. If we 103our filesystems, and extract either a stage1, stage2 or stage3 tarball. If we
104are using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, we will take the appropriate steps to get 104are using a stage1 or stage2 tarball, we will take the appropriate steps to get
105our system to stage3. Once our system is at stage3, we can configure it 105our system to stage3. Once our system is at stage3, we can configure it
106(customize configuration files, install a bootloader, etc) and boot it and have a 106(customize configuration files, install a boot loader, etc) and boot it and have a
107fully-functional Gentoo Linux system. Depending on what stage of the build 107fully-functional Gentoo Linux system. Depending on what stage of the build
108process you're starting from, here is what is required for installation: </p> 108process you're starting from, here is what is required for installation: </p>
109 <table> 109 <table>
110 <tr> 110 <tr>
111 <th>stage tarball</th> 111 <th>stage tarball</th>
139 <p> Once you hit Enter, you will be greeted with the standard kernel 139 <p> Once you hit Enter, you will be greeted with the standard kernel
140booting output, kernel and initrd messages, followed by the normal Gentoo 140booting output, kernel and initrd messages, followed by the normal Gentoo
141Linux boot sequence. You will be automatically logged in as 141Linux boot sequence. You will be automatically logged in as
142&quot;<c>root</c>&quot; and the root password will be set to a random string 142&quot;<c>root</c>&quot; and the root password will be set to a random string
143for security purposes. You should have a root (&quot;<c>#</c>&quot;) prompt 143for security purposes. You should have a root (&quot;<c>#</c>&quot;) prompt
144on the current console, and can also swith to other consoles by pressing 144on the current console, and can also switch to other consoles by pressing
145Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you started on by pressing 145Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you started on by pressing
146Alt-F1. At this point you should set the root password, type passwd and 146Alt-F1. At this point you should set the root password, type passwd and
147follow the prompts. 147follow the prompts.
148 </p> 148 </p>
149 <p>You've probably also noticed that above your <c>#</c> prompt is a bunch of help text 149 <p>You've probably also noticed that above your <c>#</c> prompt is a bunch of help text
347 </body> 347 </body>
348 </section> 348 </section>
349 <section> 349 <section>
350 <title>Networking is go!</title> 350 <title>Networking is go!</title>
351 <body> 351 <body>
352 <p>Networking should now be configured and useable. You should be able to use the included 352 <p>Networking should now be configured and usable. You should be able to use the included
353 <c>ssh</c>, <c>scp</c>, <c>lynx</c>, <c>irssi</c> and <c>wget</c> commands to connect to other machines on your LAN or the Internet.</p> 353 <c>ssh</c>, <c>scp</c>, <c>lynx</c>, <c>irssi</c> and <c>wget</c> commands to connect to other machines on your LAN or the Internet.</p>
354 </body> 354 </body>
355 </section> 355 </section>
356 </chapter> 356 </chapter>
357 <chapter> 357 <chapter>
437 437
438 <p>But before creating filesystems, you may want to initialize the 438 <p>But before creating filesystems, you may want to initialize the
439 beginning of your hard disk using <c>dd</c> if you are using a pre-existing partition that has been used before. 439 beginning of your hard disk using <c>dd</c> if you are using a pre-existing partition that has been used before.
440 This is particularly helpful when you're going to create a new XFS filesystem on a partition that previously contained 440 This is particularly helpful when you're going to create a new XFS filesystem on a partition that previously contained
441 a ReiserFS filesystem. Doing this will ensure that your new filesystem 441 a ReiserFS filesystem. Doing this will ensure that your new filesystem
442 will not be mis-indentified by Linux's filesystem auto-detection code. 442 will not be mis-identified by Linux's filesystem auto-detection code.
443 This can be done as follows: 443 This can be done as follows:
444 </p> 444 </p>
445 <pre caption="Initializing first 1024 Sectors of HD"> 445 <pre caption="Initializing first 1024 Sectors of HD">
446# <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdxy bs=1K count=1</c> 446# <c>dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hdxy bs=1K count=1</c>
447<comment>Replace /dev/hdxy with the device you wish to &quot;clean.&quot;</comment> 447<comment>Replace /dev/hdxy with the device you wish to &quot;clean.&quot;</comment>
464 </pre> 464 </pre>
465 <note> 465 <note>
466 You may want to add a couple of additional flags to the <c>mkfs.xfs</c> command: <c>-d agcount=3 -l size=32m</c>. 466 You may want to add a couple of additional flags to the <c>mkfs.xfs</c> command: <c>-d agcount=3 -l size=32m</c>.
467 The <c>-d agcount=3</c> command will lower 467 The <c>-d agcount=3</c> command will lower
468 the number of allocation groups. XFS will insist on using at least 1 allocation group per 4 GB of your partition, 468 the number of allocation groups. XFS will insist on using at least 1 allocation group per 4 GB of your partition,
469 so, for example, if you hava a 20 GB partition you will need a minimum agcount of 5. 469 so, for example, if you have a 20 GB partition you will need a minimum agcount of 5.
470 The <c>-l size=32m</c> command increases the journal size to 32 Mb, increasing performance. 470 The <c>-l size=32m</c> command increases the journal size to 32 Mb, increasing performance.
471 </note> 471 </note>
472 <p>If you would like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using <c>mke2fs -j</c>.</p> 472 <p>If you would like to use ext3, you can create ext3 filesystems using <c>mke2fs -j</c>.</p>
473 <pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem"> 473 <pre caption="Creating an ext3 Filesystem">
474# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c> 474# <c>mke2fs -j /dev/hda3</c>
479 <p>To create ReiserFS filesystems, use the <c>mkreiserfs</c> command.</p> 479 <p>To create ReiserFS filesystems, use the <c>mkreiserfs</c> command.</p>
480 <pre caption="Creating a ReiserFS Filesystem"> 480 <pre caption="Creating a ReiserFS Filesystem">
481# <c>mkreiserfs /dev/hda3</c> 481# <c>mkreiserfs /dev/hda3</c>
482 </pre> 482 </pre>
483 483
484 <p>To create JFS filesystems, use the <c>mkfs.jfs</c> comamnd.</p> 484 <p>To create JFS filesystems, use the <c>mkfs.jfs</c> command.</p>
485 <pre caption="Creating a JFS Filesystem"> 485 <pre caption="Creating a JFS Filesystem">
486# <c>mkfs.jfs /dev/hda3</c> 486# <c>mkfs.jfs /dev/hda3</c>
487 </pre> 487 </pre>
488 488
489 </body> 489 </body>
498 </p> 498 </p>
499 <pre caption="Activating Swap"> 499 <pre caption="Activating Swap">
500# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c> 500# <c>swapon /dev/hda2</c>
501 </pre> 501 </pre>
502 <p>Next, we will create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mount points, 502 <p>Next, we will create the <path>/mnt/gentoo</path> and <path>/mnt/gentoo/boot</path> mount points,
503 and we will mount our filesystems to these mountpoints. </p> 503 and we will mount our filesystems to these mount points. </p>
504 <pre caption="Creating Mount Points"> 504 <pre caption="Creating Mount Points">
505# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c> 505# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo</c>
506# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c> 506# <c>mount /dev/hda3 /mnt/gentoo</c>
507# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 507# <c>mkdir /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
508# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c> 508# <c>mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/gentoo/boot</c>
661 <body> 661 <body>
662 <p>You need to set your time zone and date before you start installing your system.</p> 662 <p>You need to set your time zone and date before you start installing your system.</p>
663 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time) in 663 <p>Look for your time zone (or GMT if you are using Greenwich Mean Time) in
664 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link by typing: 664 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>. Then, make a symbolic link by typing:
665 </p> 665 </p>
666 <pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for time zome"> 666 <pre caption="Creating a symbolic link for time zone">
667# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c> 667# <c>ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/path/to/timezonefile /etc/localtime</c>
668# <c>date</c> 668# <c>date</c>
669Thu Feb 27 09:04:42 CST 2003 669Thu Feb 27 09:04:42 CST 2003
670<comment>(If your date is wrong set your date with this next command)</comment> 670<comment>(If your date is wrong set your date with this next command)</comment>
671# <c>date 022709042003</c> 671# <c>date 022709042003</c>
1009# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't 1009# noatime turns off atimes for increased performance (atimes normally aren't
1010# needed; notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage 1010# needed; notail increases performance of ReiserFS (at the expense of storage
1011# efficiency). It is safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to 1011# efficiency). It is safe to drop the noatime options if you want and to
1012# switch between notail and tail freely. 1012# switch between notail and tail freely.
1013 1013
1014# &lt;fs&gt; &lt;mountpoint&gt; &lt;type&gt; &lt;opts&gt; &lt;dump/pass&gt; 1014# &lt;fs&gt; &lt;mount point&gt; &lt;type&gt; &lt;opts&gt; &lt;dump/pass&gt;
1015 1015
1016# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts. 1016# NOTE: If your BOOT partition is ReiserFS, add the notail option to opts.
1017</comment> 1017</comment>
1018/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2 1018/dev/BOOT /boot ext2 noauto,noatime 1 2
1019/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1 1019/dev/ROOT / ext3 noatime 0 1

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