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1 nightmorph 1.1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2     <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3    
4     <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5     <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6    
7     <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/2006.1/hb-install-alpha-medium.xml,v 1.2 2006/09/05 06:51:07 rane Exp $ -->
8    
9     <sections>
10    
11     <version>7.0</version>
12     <date>2006-08-30</date>
13    
14     <section>
15     <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
16     <subsection>
17     <title>Introduction</title>
18     <body>
19    
20     <p>
21     Before we start, we first list what hardware requirements you need to
22     successfully install Gentoo on your box.
23     </p>
24    
25     </body>
26     </subsection>
27     <subsection>
28     <title>Hardware Requirements</title>
29     <body>
30    
31     <table>
32     <tr>
33     <th>CPU</th>
34     <ti>
35     Please check with the <uri
36     link="http://www.alphalinux.org/faq/FAQ-5.html">Alpha/Linux FAQ</uri>
37     </ti>
38     </tr>
39     <tr>
40     <th>Memory</th>
41     <ti>64 MB</ti>
42     </tr>
43     <tr>
44     <th>Diskspace</th>
45     <ti>1.5 GB (excluding swap space)</ti>
46     </tr>
47     <tr>
48     <th>Swap space</th>
49     <ti>At least 256 MB</ti>
50     </tr>
51     </table>
52    
53     </body>
54     </subsection>
55     </section>
56     <!-- Copy/paste from the hb-install-x86-medium.xml file but no Universal
57     Installation CD.
58     Also s/x86/alpha -->
59     <!-- START -->
60     <section>
61     <title>The Gentoo Universal Installation CD</title>
62     <subsection>
63     <title>Introduction</title>
64     <body>
65    
66     <p>
67     Gentoo Linux can be installed using a <e>stage3</e> tarball file.
68     Such a tarball is an archive that contains a minimal environment from
69     which you can succesfully install Gentoo Linux onto your system.
70     </p>
71    
72     <p>
73     Installations using a stage1 or stage2 tarball file are not documented in the
74     Gentoo Handbook - please read the <uri link="/doc/en/faq.xml#stage12">Gentoo
75     FAQ</uri> on these matters.
76     </p>
77    
78     </body>
79     </subsection>
80     <subsection>
81     <title>Gentoo Universal Installation CD</title>
82     <body>
83    
84     <p>
85     An Installation CD is a bootable medium which contains a self-sustained Gentoo
86     environment. It allows you to boot Linux from the CD. During the boot process
87     your hardware is detected and the appropriate drivers are loaded. The Gentoo
88     Installation CDs are maintained by Gentoo developers.
89     </p>
90    
91     <p>
92     There currently are two Installation CDs available:
93     </p>
94    
95     <ul>
96     <li>
97     The Universal Installation CD contains everything you need to install
98     Gentoo. It provides stage3 files for common architectures, source code
99     for the extra applications you need to choose from and, of course, the
100     installation instructions for your architecture.
101     </li>
102     <li>
103     The Minimal Installation CD contains only a minimal environment that allows
104     you to boot up and configure your network so you can connect to the
105     Internet. It does not contain any additional files and cannot be used
106     during the current installation approach.
107     </li>
108     </ul>
109    
110     </body>
111     </subsection>
112     </section>
113     <!-- STOP -->
114     <section>
115     <title>Download, Burn and Boot the Gentoo Universal Installation CD</title>
116     <subsection>
117     <title>Downloading and Burning the Installation CD</title>
118     <body>
119    
120     <p>
121     You can download the Universal Installation CD from one of our <uri
122     link="/main/en/mirrors.xml">mirrors</uri>. The Installation CD is located in
123     the <path>releases/alpha/2006.1/installcd</path> directory.
124     </p>
125    
126     <p>
127     Inside those directories you'll find ISO-files. Those are full CD images which
128     you can write on a CD-R.
129     </p>
130    
131     <p>
132     After downloading the file, you can verify its integrity to see if it is
133     corrupted or not:
134     </p>
135    
136     <ul>
137     <li>
138     You can check its MD5 checksum and compare it with the MD5 checksum we
139     provide (for instance with the <c>md5sum</c> tool under Linux/Unix or
140     <uri link="http://www.etree.org/md5com.html">md5sum</uri> for Windows)
141     </li>
142     <li>
143     You can verify the cryptographic signature that we provide. You need to
144     obtain the public key we use (17072058) before you proceed though.
145     </li>
146     </ul>
147    
148     <p>
149     To fetch our public key using the GnuPG application, run the following command:
150     </p>
151    
152     <pre caption="Obtaining the public key">
153     $ <i>gpg --keyserver subkeys.pgp.net --recv-keys 17072058</i>
154     </pre>
155    
156     <p>
157     Now verify the signature:
158     </p>
159    
160     <pre caption="Verify the cryptographic signature">
161     $ <i>gpg --verify &lt;signature file&gt; &lt;downloaded iso&gt;</i>
162     </pre>
163    
164     <p>
165     To burn the downloaded ISO(s), you have to select raw-burning. How you
166     do this is highly program-dependent. We will discuss <c>cdrecord</c> and
167     <c>K3B</c> here; more information can be found in our <uri
168     link="/doc/en/faq.xml#isoburning">Gentoo FAQ</uri>.
169     </p>
170    
171     <ul>
172     <li>
173     With cdrecord, you simply type <c>cdrecord dev=/dev/hdc &lt;downloaded iso
174     file&gt;</c> (replace <path>/dev/hdc</path> with your CD-RW drive's device
175     path).
176     </li>
177     <li>
178     With K3B, select <c>Tools</c> &gt; <c>CD</c> &gt; <c>Burn Image</c>. Then
179     you can locate your ISO file within the 'Image to Burn' area. Finally click
180     <c>Start</c>.
181     </li>
182     </ul>
183    
184     </body>
185     </subsection>
186     <subsection>
187     <title>Booting the Universal Installation CD</title>
188     <body>
189    
190     <p>
191     When your Alpha is powered on, the first thing that gets started is the
192     firmware. It is loosely synonymous with the BIOS software on PC systems. There
193     are two types of firmware on Alpha systems: SRM (<e>Systems Reference
194     Manual</e>) and ARC (<e>Advanced Risc Console</e>).
195     </p>
196    
197     <p>
198     SRM is based on the Alpha Console Subsystem specification, which provides an
199     operating environment for OpenVMS, Tru64 UNIX, and Linux operating systems. ARC
200     is based on the Advanced RISC Computing (ARC) specification, which provides
201     an operating environment for Windows NT. You can find a
202     <uri link="http://www.alphalinux.org/faq/SRM-HOWTO/">detailed guide</uri> on
203     using SRM over at the Alpha Linux website.
204     </p>
205    
206     <p>
207     If your Alpha system supports both SRC and ARCs (ARC, AlphaBIOS, ARCSBIOS) you
208     should follow <uri link="http://www.alphalinux.org/faq/x31.html">these
209     instructions</uri> for switching to SRM. If your system already uses SRM, you
210     are all set. If your system can only use ARCs (Ruffian, nautilus, xl, etc.) you
211     will need to choose <c>MILO</c> later on when we are talking about bootloaders.
212     </p>
213    
214     <p>
215     Now to boot an Alpha Installation CD, put the CD-ROM in the tray and reboot the system.
216     You can use SRM to boot the Installation CD. If you cannot do that, you will have to use
217     <c>MILO</c>. If you don't have <c>MILO</c> installed already, use one of the
218     precompiled <c>MILO</c> images available on <uri
219     link="http://dev.gentoo.org/~taviso/milo/">taviso's homepage</uri>.
220     </p>
221    
222     <p>
223     This release also includes two entries for people who want to use a serial
224     console during the installation, possibly boxes with no keyboard and screen
225     attached. One allows you to boot 2.6 using the serial console and the other will
226     do the same with our 2.4 kernel.
227     </p>
228    
229     <pre caption="Booting a CD-ROM using SRM">
230     <comment>(List available hardware drives)</comment>
231     &gt;&gt;&gt; <i>show device</i>
232     dkb0.0.1.4.0 DKB0 TOSHIBA CDROM
233     <comment>(...)</comment>
234     <comment>(Substitute dkb0 with your CD-ROM drive device)</comment>
235     &gt;&gt;&gt; <i>boot dkb0 -flags 0</i>
236     <comment>(To boot the 2.4 kernel instead of the default 2.6 kernel use:)</comment>
237     &gt;&gt;&gt; <i>boot dkb -flags 1</i>
238     <comment>(If you need serial console support)</comment>
239     <comment>(To boot the 2.6 kernel with serial console support use:)</comment>
240     &gt;&gt;&gt; <i>boot dkb0 -flags 2</i>
241     <comment>(To boot the 2.4 kernel with serial console support use:)</comment>
242     &gt;&gt;&gt; <i>boot dkb0 -flags 3</i>
243     </pre>
244    
245     <pre caption="Booting a CD-ROM using MILO">
246     <comment>(Substitute hdb with your CD-ROM drive device)</comment>
247     MILO&gt; <i>boot hdb:/boot/gentoo_2.6 initrd=/boot/gentoo_2_6.igz root=/dev/ram0 init=/linuxrc looptype=zisofs loop=/zisofs cdroot</i>
248     <comment>(To boot the 2.4 kernel instead of the default 2.6 kernel use:)</comment>
249     MILO&gt; <i>boot hdb:/boot/gentoo_2.4 initrd=/boot/gentoo_2_4.igz root=/dev/ram0 init=/linuxrc looptype=zisofs loop=/zisofs cdroot</i>
250     <comment>(If you need serial console support)</comment>
251     <comment>(To boot the 2.6 kernel with serial console support use:)</comment>
252     MILO&gt; <i>boot hdb:/boot/gentoo_2.6 initrd=/boot/gentoo_2_6.igz root=/dev/ram0 init=/linuxrc looptype=zisofs loop=/zisofs console=ttyS0</i>
253     <comment>(To boot the 2.4 kernel with serial console support use:)</comment>
254     MILO&gt; <i>boot hdb:/boot/gentoo_2.4 initrd=/boot/gentoo_2_4.igz root=/dev/ram0 init=/linuxrc looptype=zisofs loop=/zisofs console=ttyS0 cdroot</i>
255     </pre>
256    
257     <p>
258     You should have a root ("#") prompt on the current console and can also switch
259     to other consoles by pressing Alt-F2, Alt-F3 and Alt-F4. Get back to the one you
260     started on by pressing Alt-F1.
261     </p>
262    
263     <p>
264     Now continue with <uri link="#hardware">Extra Hardware Configuration</uri>.
265     </p>
266    
267     </body>
268     </subsection>
269     <subsection id="hardware">
270     <title>Extra Hardware Configuration</title>
271     <body>
272    
273     <p>
274     When the Installation CD boots, it tries to detect all your hardware devices and
275     loads the appropriate kernel modules to support your hardware. In the
276     vast majority of cases, it does a very good job. However, in some cases (the
277     SPARC Installation CDs don't even do autodetection), it may not auto-load the kernel
278     modules you need. If the PCI auto-detection missed some of your system's
279     hardware, you will have to load the appropriate kernel modules manually.
280     </p>
281    
282     <p>
283     In the next example we try to load the <c>8139too</c> module (support for
284     certain kinds of network interfaces):
285     </p>
286    
287     <pre caption="Loading kernel modules">
288     # <i>modprobe 8139too</i>
289     </pre>
290    
291     <p>
292     If you need PCMCIA support, you should start the <c>pcmcia</c> init script:
293     </p>
294    
295     <pre caption="Starting the PCMCIA init script">
296     # <i>/etc/init.d/pcmcia start</i>
297     </pre>
298    
299     </body>
300     </subsection>
301     <subsection>
302     <title>Optional: Tweaking Hard Disk Performance</title>
303     <body>
304    
305     <p>
306     If you are an advanced user, you might want to tweak the IDE hard disk
307     performance using <c>hdparm</c>. With the <c>-tT</c> options you can
308     test the performance of your disk (execute it several times to get a
309     more precise impression):
310     </p>
311    
312     <pre caption="Testing disk performance">
313     # <i>hdparm -tT /dev/hda</i>
314     </pre>
315    
316     <p>
317     To tweak, you can use any of the following examples (or experiment
318     yourself) which use <path>/dev/hda</path> as disk (substitute with your
319     disk):
320     </p>
321    
322     <pre caption="Tweaking hard disk performance">
323     <comment>Activate DMA:</comment> # <i>hdparm -d 1 /dev/hda</i>
324     <comment>Activate DMA + Safe Performance-enhancing Options:</comment> # <i>hdparm -d 1 -A 1 -m 16 -u 1 -a 64 /dev/hda</i>
325     </pre>
326    
327     </body>
328     </subsection>
329     <subsection id="useraccounts">
330     <title>Optional: User Accounts</title>
331     <body>
332    
333     <p>
334     If you plan on giving other people access to your installation
335     environment or you want to chat using <c>irssi</c> without root privileges (for
336     security reasons), you need to create the necessary user accounts and change
337     the root password.
338     </p>
339    
340     <p>
341     To change the root password, use the <c>passwd</c> utility:
342     </p>
343    
344     <pre caption="Changing the root password">
345     # <i>passwd</i>
346     New password: <comment>(Enter your new password)</comment>
347     Re-enter password: <comment>(Re-enter your password)</comment>
348     </pre>
349    
350     <p>
351     To create a user account, we first enter their credentials, followed by
352     its password. We use <c>useradd</c> and <c>passwd</c> for these tasks.
353     In the next example, we create a user called &quot;john&quot;.
354     </p>
355    
356     <pre caption="Creating a user account">
357     # <i>useradd -m -G users john</i>
358     # <i>passwd john</i>
359     New password: <comment>(Enter john's password)</comment>
360     Re-enter password: <comment>(Re-enter john's password)</comment>
361     </pre>
362    
363     <p>
364     You can change your user id from root to the newly created user by using
365     <c>su</c>:
366     </p>
367    
368     <pre caption="Changing user id">
369     # <i>su - john</i>
370     </pre>
371    
372     </body>
373     </subsection>
374     <subsection>
375     <title>Optional: Viewing Documentation while Installing</title>
376     <body>
377    
378     <p>
379     If you want to view the Gentoo Handbook (either from-CD or online) during the
380     installation, make sure you have created a user account (see <uri
381     link="#useraccounts">Optional: User Accounts</uri>). Then press <c>Alt-F2</c> to
382     go to a new terminal and log in.
383     </p>
384    
385     <p>
386     If you want to view the documentation on the CD you can immediately run
387     <c>lynx</c> to read it:
388     </p>
389    
390     <pre caption="Viewing the on-CD documentation">
391     # <i>lynx /mnt/cdrom/docs/html/index.html</i>
392     </pre>
393    
394     <p>
395     However, it is preferred that you use the online Gentoo Handbook as it will be
396     more recent than the one provided on the CD. You can view it using <c>lynx</c>
397     as well, but only after having completed the <e>Configuring your Network</e>
398     chapter (otherwise you won't be able to go on the Internet to view the
399     document):
400     </p>
401    
402     <pre caption="Viewing the Online Documentation">
403     # <i>lynx http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-alpha.xml</i>
404     </pre>
405    
406     <p>
407     You can go back to your original terminal by pressing <c>Alt-F1</c>.
408     </p>
409    
410     </body>
411     </subsection>
412     <subsection>
413     <title>Optional: Starting the SSH Daemon</title>
414     <body>
415    
416     <p>
417     If you want to allow other users to access your computer during the
418     Gentoo installation (perhaps because those users are going to help you
419     install Gentoo, or even do it for you), you need to create a user
420     account for them and perhaps even provide them with your root password
421     (<e>only</e> do that <e>if</e> you <b>fully trust</b> that user).
422     </p>
423    
424     <p>
425     To fire up the SSH daemon, execute the following command:
426     </p>
427    
428     <pre caption="Starting the SSH daemon">
429     # <i>/etc/init.d/sshd start</i>
430     </pre>
431    
432     <p>
433     To be able to use sshd, you first need to set up your networking. Continue with
434     the chapter on <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=3">Configuring your Network</uri>.
435     </p>
436    
437     </body>
438     </subsection>
439     </section>
440     </sections>

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