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39 <author title="Editor"> 39 <author title="Editor">
40 <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail> 40 <mail link="peesh@gentoo.org">Jorge Paulo</mail>
41 </author> 41 </author>
42 <author title="Editor"> 42 <author title="Editor">
43 <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail> 43 <mail link="carl@gentoo.org">Carl Anderson</mail>
44 </author> 44 </author>
45 <author title="Editor"> 45 <author title="Editor">
46 <mail link="swift@gentoo.org">Sven Vermeulen</mail> 46 <mail link="swift@gentoo.org">Sven Vermeulen</mail>
47 </author> 47 </author>
48 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo 48 <abstract>These instructions step you through the process of installing Gentoo
49 Linux 1.4_rc4. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation 49 Linux 1.4_rc4. The Gentoo Linux installation process supports various installation
50 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from 50 approaches, depending upon how much of the system you want to custom-build from
51 scratch. 51 scratch.
52 </abstract> 52 </abstract>
53<version>2.6.1</version> 53<version>2.6.1</version>
54 <date>4th of July 2003</date> 54 <date>7th of July 2003</date>
55 <chapter> 55 <chapter>
56 <title>About the Install</title> 56 <title>About the Install</title>
57 <section> 57 <section>
58 <body> 58 <body>
59 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well 59 <p>This new boot CD will boot from nearly any modern IDE CD-ROM drive, as well
60as many SCSI CD-ROM drives, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting. 60as many SCSI CD-ROM drives, assuming that your CD-ROM and BIOS both support booting.
61Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the 61Included on the CD-ROM is Linux support for IDE (and PCI IDE) (built-in to the
62kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In 62kernel) as well as support for all SCSI devices (available as modules.) In
63addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that 63addition, we provide modules for literally every kind of network card that
64Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and 64Linux supports, as well as tools to allow you to configure your network and
65establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and to download 65establish outbound (as well as inbound) <c>ssh</c> connections and to download
66files. </p> 66files. </p>
67 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and 67 <p>To install from the build CD, you will need to have a 486+ processor and
68ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo Linux has been successfully 68ideally at least 64 Megabytes of RAM. (Gentoo Linux has been successfully
69built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully 69built with 64MB of RAM + 64MB of swap space, but the build process is awfully
126 <th>requirements for installation</th> 126 <th>requirements for installation</th>
127 </tr> 127 </tr>
128 <tr> 128 <tr>
129 <ti>1</ti> 129 <ti>1</ti>
130 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, bootstrap, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti> 130 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, bootstrap, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti>
131 </tr> 131 </tr>
132 <tr> 132 <tr>
133 <ti>2</ti> 133 <ti>2</ti>
134 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti> 134 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, emerge system, emerge kernel sources, final configuration</ti>
135 </tr> 135 </tr>
136 <tr> 136 <tr>
137 <ti>3</ti> 137 <ti>3</ti>
138 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, final configuration</ti> 138 <ti>partition/filesystem setup, emerge sync, final configuration</ti>
139 </tr> 139 </tr>
140 </table> 140 </table>
141 <note>Hardware ATA RAID users should read the section about
142 ATA RAID on the bottom of this document before proceeding.
143 </note>
141 </body> 144 </body>
142 </section> 145 </section>
143 </chapter> 146 </chapter>
144 <chapter> 147 <chapter>
145 <title>Booting</title> 148 <title>Booting</title>
146 <section> 149 <section>
147 <body> 150 <body>
148 <warn>Read this whole section before proceeding, especially the 151 <warn>Read this whole section before proceeding, especially the
149 available boot options. Ignoring this could lead to wrong 152 available boot options. Ignoring this could lead to wrong
150 keyboard settings, unstarted pcmcia services etc.</warn> 153 keyboard settings, unstarted pcmcia services etc.</warn>
151 <p>Start by booting the LiveCD. You should see a fancy boot screen 154 <p>Start by booting the LiveCD. You should see a fancy boot screen
152 with the Gentoo Linux logo on it. At this screen, you can hit Enter to begin the boot process, 155 with the Gentoo Linux logo on it. At this screen, you can hit Enter to begin the boot process,
153 or boot the LiveCD with custom boot options by specifying a kernel followed by boot options and then hitting Enter. For example <c>gentoo nousb nohotplug</c>. Consult the following table for a list of available kernels and options or press F2 to view the help screen.</p> 156 or boot the LiveCD with custom boot options by specifying a kernel followed by boot options and then hitting Enter. For example <c>gentoo nousb nohotplug</c>. Consult the following table for a list of available kernels and options or press F2 to view the help screen.</p>
154 157
155 <table> 158 <table>
249<comment>(replace pcnet32 with your NIC module)</comment> 252<comment>(replace pcnet32 with your NIC module)</comment>
250</pre> 253</pre>
251 <p>Likewise, if you want to be able to access any SCSI hardware that wasn't detected 254 <p>Likewise, if you want to be able to access any SCSI hardware that wasn't detected
252 during the initial boot autodetection process, you will need to load the appropriate 255 during the initial boot autodetection process, you will need to load the appropriate
253 modules from /lib/modules, again using <c>modprobe</c>: 256 modules from /lib/modules, again using <c>modprobe</c>:
254 </p> 257 </p>
255<pre caption="Loading SCSI Modules"> 258<pre caption="Loading SCSI Modules">
256# <c>modprobe aic7xxx</c> 259# <c>modprobe aic7xxx</c>
257<comment>(replace aic7xxx with your SCSI adapter module)</comment> 260<comment>(replace aic7xxx with your SCSI adapter module)</comment>
258# <c>modprobe sd_mod</c> 261# <c>modprobe sd_mod</c>
259<comment>(sd_mod is the module for SCSI disk support)</comment> 262<comment>(sd_mod is the module for SCSI disk support)</comment>
260</pre> 263</pre>
261 <note> 264 <note>
262 Support for a SCSI CD-ROMs and disks are built-in in the kernel. 265 Support for a SCSI CD-ROMs and disks are built-in in the kernel.
263 </note> 266 </note>
264 <p>If you are using hardware RAID, you will need to load the
265 ATA-RAID modules for your RAID controller.
266 </p>
267<pre caption="Loading RAID Modules">
268# <c>modprobe ataraid</c>
269# <c>modprobe pdcraid</c>
270<comment>(Promise Raid Controller)</comment>
271# <c>modprobe hptraid</c>
272<comment>(Highpoint Raid Controller)</comment>
273</pre>
274 <p>The Gentoo LiveCD should have enabled DMA on your disks, but if it did not, 267 <p>The Gentoo LiveCD should have enabled DMA on your disks, but if it did not,
275 <c>hdparm</c> can be used to set DMA on your drives. </p> 268 <c>hdparm</c> can be used to set DMA on your drives. </p>
276<pre caption="Setting DMA"> 269<pre caption="Setting DMA">
277<comment>Replace hdX with your disk device.</comment> 270<comment>Replace hdX with your disk device.</comment>
278# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA </comment> 271# hdparm -d 1 /dev/hdX <comment>Enables DMA </comment>
279# hdparm -d1 -A1 -m16 -u1 -a64 /dev/hdX 272# hdparm -d1 -A1 -m16 -u1 -a64 /dev/hdX
280<comment>(Enables DMA and other safe performance-enhancing options)</comment> 273<comment>(Enables DMA and other safe performance-enhancing options)</comment>
281# hdparm -X66 /dev/hdX 274# hdparm -X66 /dev/hdX
282<comment>(Force-enables Ultra-DMA -- dangerous -- may cause some drives to mess up)</comment> 275<comment>(Force-enables Ultra-DMA -- dangerous -- may cause some drives to mess up)</comment>
283</pre> 276</pre>
284 </body> 277 </body>
285 </section> 278 </section>
286 </chapter> 279 </chapter>
287<!-- THIS SECTION SHOULD BE DEPRECATED WITH HOTPLUG ENABLED IN 1.4_rc3 (drobbins) 280<!-- THIS SECTION SHOULD BE DEPRECATED WITH HOTPLUG ENABLED IN 1.4_rc3 (drobbins)
288 <chapter> 281 <chapter>
717 710
718<p>Now, it's time to delete any existing partitions. To do this, type <c>d</c> 711<p>Now, it's time to delete any existing partitions. To do this, type <c>d</c>
719and hit Enter. You will then be prompted for the partition number you would like 712and hit Enter. You will then be prompted for the partition number you would like
720to delete. To delete a pre-existing <c>/dev/hda1</c>, you would type:</p> 713to delete. To delete a pre-existing <c>/dev/hda1</c>, you would type:</p>
721 714
722<pre caption="Deleting a partition"> 715<pre caption="Deleting a partition">
723Command (m for help): d 716Command (m for help): d
724Partition number (1-4): 1 717Partition number (1-4): 1
725</pre> 718</pre>
726 719
727<p>The partition has been scheduled for deletion. It will no longer show up if 720<p>The partition has been scheduled for deletion. It will no longer show up if
728you type <c>p</c>, but it will not be erased until your changes have been 721you type <c>p</c>, but it will not be erased until your changes have been
729saved. If you made a mistake and want to abort without saving your changes, 722saved. If you made a mistake and want to abort without saving your changes,
730type <c>q</c> immediately and hit enter and your partition will not be 723type <c>q</c> immediately and hit enter and your partition will not be
731deleted.</p> 724deleted.</p>
732<!-- NOTE: THis is not sufficient documentation to cover ATA Raid and I just
733find it confusing, so I'm commenting it out (drobbins)
734<note>If you are using RAID your partitions will be a little different. You
735will have the partitions like this: <path>/dev/ataraid/discX/partY</path> X are
736the arrays you have made, so if you only have made 1 array, then it will be
737disc0.Y is the partition number as in <path>/dev/hdaY</path> </note>
738-->
739<p>Now, assuming that you do indeed want to wipe out all the partitions on your 725<p>Now, assuming that you do indeed want to wipe out all the partitions on your
740system, repeatedly type <c>p</c> to print out a partition listing and then type 726system, repeatedly type <c>p</c> to print out a partition listing and then type
741<c>d</c> and the number of the partition to delete it. Eventually, you'll end up 727<c>d</c> and the number of the partition to delete it. Eventually, you'll end up
742with a partition table with nothing in it:</p> 728with a partition table with nothing in it:</p>
743 729
744<pre caption="An empty partition table"> 730<pre caption="An empty partition table">
745Disk /dev/hda: 30.0 GB, 30005821440 bytes 731Disk /dev/hda: 30.0 GB, 30005821440 bytes
746240 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3876 cylinders 732240 heads, 63 sectors/track, 3876 cylinders
747Units = cylinders of 15120 * 512 = 7741440 bytes 733Units = cylinders of 15120 * 512 = 7741440 bytes
748 734
749 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System 735 Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
750 736
751Command (m for help): 737Command (m for help):
752</pre> 738</pre>
753 739
1085</body> 1071</body>
1086</section> 1072</section>
1087<section> 1073<section>
1088<title>Entering the chroot</title> 1074<title>Entering the chroot</title>
1089<body> 1075<body>
1090<p> 1076<p>
1091Next, we will <c>chroot</c> over to the new Gentoo Linux build installation to &quot;enter&quot; the new 1077Next, we will <c>chroot</c> over to the new Gentoo Linux build installation to &quot;enter&quot; the new
1092Gentoo Linux system. 1078Gentoo Linux system.
1093</p> 1079</p>
1094 1080
1095<note> 1081<note>
1096You may receive a notice during <c>env-update</c> telling you that 1082You may receive a notice during <c>env-update</c> telling you that
1097<path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path> isn't available: ignore it. We are 1083<path>/etc/make.profile/make.defaults</path> isn't available: ignore it. We are
1098going to issue <c>emerge sync</c> later on in this document which will resolve 1084going to issue <c>emerge sync</c> later on in this document which will resolve
1099the problem. 1085the problem.
1100</note>
1101
1102<note>
1103Hardware RAID users who want to use GRUB should run <c>mount -o bind /dev
1104/mnt/gentoo/dev</c> before chrooting.
1105</note> 1086</note>
1106 1087
1107<pre caption="Prepping and entering the chroot environment"> 1088<pre caption="Prepping and entering the chroot environment">
1108# <c>mount -t proc proc /mnt/gentoo/proc</c> 1089# <c>mount -t proc proc /mnt/gentoo/proc</c>
1109# <c>cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf</c> 1090# <c>cp /etc/resolv.conf /mnt/gentoo/etc/resolv.conf</c>
1110# <c>chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash</c> 1091# <c>chroot /mnt/gentoo /bin/bash</c>
1111# <c>env-update</c> 1092# <c>env-update</c>
1112Regenerating /etc/ld.so.cache... 1093Regenerating /etc/ld.so.cache...
1113# <c>source /etc/profile</c> 1094# <c>source /etc/profile</c>
1114<comment>(The above points your shell to the new paths and updated binaries.)</comment> 1095<comment>(The above points your shell to the new paths and updated binaries.)</comment>
1115</pre> 1096</pre>
1116 <p>After you execute these commands, you will be &quot;inside&quot; your new Gentoo Linux environment in <path>/mnt/gentoo</path>. 1097 <p>After you execute these commands, you will be &quot;inside&quot; your new Gentoo Linux environment in <path>/mnt/gentoo</path>.
1117 We can perform the rest of the installation process inside the chroot. 1098 We can perform the rest of the installation process inside the chroot.
1118 </p> 1099 </p>
1119 </body> 1100 </body>
1382 ... 1363 ...
1383 [*] /proc file system support 1364 [*] /proc file system support
1384<comment>(Required for Gentoo Linux.)</comment> 1365<comment>(Required for Gentoo Linux.)</comment>
1385 [*] /dev file system support (EXPERIMENTAL) 1366 [*] /dev file system support (EXPERIMENTAL)
1386 [*] Automatically mount at boot 1367 [*] Automatically mount at boot
1387<comment>(Required for Gentoo Linux.)</comment> 1368<comment>(Required for Gentoo Linux.)</comment>
1388 [ ] /dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs 1369 [ ] /dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs
1389<comment>(Uncheck this, it is NOT needed.)</comment> 1370<comment>(Uncheck this, it is NOT needed.)</comment>
1390 ... 1371 ...
1391 &lt;*&gt; Second extended fs support 1372 &lt;*&gt; Second extended fs support
1392<comment>(Only needed if you are using ext2.)</comment> 1373<comment>(Only needed if you are using ext2.)</comment>
1393 ... 1374 ...
1394 &lt;*&gt; XFS filesystem support 1375 &lt;*&gt; XFS filesystem support
1395<comment>(Only needed if you are using XFS.)</comment> 1376<comment>(Only needed if you are using XFS.)</comment>
1396</pre> 1377</pre>
1397 <p>If you are using hardware RAID you will need to enable a couple more options in the kernel:
1398 For Highpoint RAID controllers select hpt366 chipset support, support for IDE RAID controllers and Highpoint
1399 370 software RAID.For Promise RAID controllers select PROMISE PDC202{46|62|65|67|68|69|70} support,
1400 support for IDE RAID
1401 controllers and Support Promise software RAID (Fasttrak(tm))
1402 </p>
1403 <p>If you use PPPoE to connect to Internet, you will need the following 1378 <p>If you use PPPoE to connect to Internet, you will need the following
1404 options in the kernel (built-in or as preferably as modules) : 1379 options in the kernel (built-in or as preferably as modules) :
1405 &quot;PPP (point-to-point protocol) support&quot;, &quot;PPP support for async serial ports&quot;, 1380 &quot;PPP (point-to-point protocol) support&quot;, &quot;PPP support for async serial ports&quot;,
1406 &quot;PPP support for sync tty ports&quot;. The two compression options won't harm but 1381 &quot;PPP support for sync tty ports&quot;. The two compression options won't harm but
1407 are not definitely needed, neither does the &quot;PPP over Ethernet&quot; option, 1382 are not definitely needed, neither does the &quot;PPP over Ethernet&quot; option,
1408 that might only be used by <i>rp-pppoe</i> when configured to do kernel mode PPPoE. 1383 that might only be used by <i>rp-pppoe</i> when configured to do kernel mode PPPoE.
1409 </p> 1384 </p>
1410 <p>If you have an IDE cd burner, then you need to enable SCSI emulation in the 1385 <p>If you have an IDE cd burner, then you need to enable SCSI emulation in the
1411 kernel. Turn on &quot;ATA/IDE/MFM/RLL support&quot; ---&gt; &quot;IDE, ATA and ATAPI Block 1386 kernel. Turn on &quot;ATA/IDE/MFM/RLL support&quot; ---&gt; &quot;IDE, ATA and ATAPI Block
1412 devices&quot; ---&gt; &quot;SCSI emulation support&quot; (I usually make it a module), then 1387 devices&quot; ---&gt; &quot;SCSI emulation support&quot; (I usually make it a module), then
1413 under &quot;SCSI support&quot; enable &quot;SCSI support&quot;, &quot;SCSI CD-ROM support&quot; and 1388 under &quot;SCSI support&quot; enable &quot;SCSI support&quot;, &quot;SCSI CD-ROM support&quot; and
1414 &quot;SCSI generic support&quot; (again, I usually compile them as modules). If you 1389 &quot;SCSI generic support&quot; (again, I usually compile them as modules). If you
1415 also choose to use modules, then <c>echo -e &quot;ide-scsi\nsg\nsr_mod&quot; 1390 also choose to use modules, then <c>echo -e &quot;ide-scsi\nsg\nsr_mod&quot;
1416 &gt;&gt; /etc/modules.autoload</c> to have them automatically added at boot time. 1391 &gt;&gt; /etc/modules.autoload</c> to have them automatically added at boot time.
1417 </p> 1392 </p>
1774 I want to type are: 1749 I want to type are:
1775 </p> 1750 </p>
1776 1751
1777<pre caption="GRUB on the MBR"> 1752<pre caption="GRUB on the MBR">
1778grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> <codenote>Your boot partition</codenote> 1753grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> <codenote>Your boot partition</codenote>
1779grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0)</c> <codenote>Where the boot record is installed, here, it is the MBR</codenote> 1754grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0)</c> <codenote>Where the boot record is installed, here, it is the MBR</codenote>
1780</pre> 1755</pre>
1781 1756
1782<pre caption="GRUB not on the MBR"> 1757<pre caption="GRUB not on the MBR">
1783<comment>Alternatively, if you wanted to install the bootloader somewhere other than the MBR</comment> 1758<comment>Alternatively, if you wanted to install the bootloader somewhere other than the MBR</comment>
1784grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> <codenote>Your boot partition</codenote> 1759grub&gt; <c>root (hd0,0)</c> <codenote>Your boot partition</codenote>
1785grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0,4)</c> <codenote>Where the boot record is installed, here it is /dev/hda5</codenote> 1760grub&gt; <c>setup (hd0,4)</c> <codenote>Where the boot record is installed, here it is /dev/hda5</codenote>
1786grub&gt; <c>quit</c> 1761grub&gt; <c>quit</c>
1787</pre> 1762</pre>
1788 1763
1789<p>
1790Hardware RAID users will have to add <c>--stage2=/boot/grub/stage2</c> to
1791the <c>setup</c> command:
1792</p>
1793
1794<pre caption = "GRUB on hardware RAID">
1795grub&lt; <i>root (hd0,0)</i>
1796grub&lt; <i>setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0)</i>
1797grub&lt; <i>quit</i>
1798</pre>
1799
1800 <p>Here is how the two commands work. The first <c>root ( )</c> command tells GRUB 1764 <p>Here is how the two commands work. The first <c>root ( )</c> command tells GRUB
1801 the location of your boot partition (in our example, <path>/dev/hda1</path> or 1765 the location of your boot partition (in our example, <path>/dev/hda1</path> or
1802 <path>(hd0,0)</path> in GRUB terminology. Then, the second <c>setup ( ) 1766 <path>(hd0,0)</path> in GRUB terminology. Then, the second <c>setup ( )
1803 </c> command tells GRUB where to install the 1767 </c> command tells GRUB where to install the
1804 boot record - it will be configured to look for its special files at the <c>root 1768 boot record - it will be configured to look for its special files at the <c>root
1805 ( )</c> location that you specified. In my case, I want the boot record on the 1769 ( )</c> location that you specified. In my case, I want the boot record on the
1806 MBR of the hard drive, so I simply specify <path>/dev/hda</path> (also known as <path>(hd0)</path>). 1770 MBR of the hard drive, so I simply specify <path>/dev/hda</path> (also known as <path>(hd0)</path>).
1807 If I were using another boot loader and wanted to set up GRUB as a secondary boot-loader, I 1771 If I were using another boot loader and wanted to set up GRUB as a secondary boot-loader, I
1808 could install GRUB to the boot record of a particular partition. In that case, 1772 could install GRUB to the boot record of a particular partition. In that case,
1809 I would specify a particular partition rather than the entire disk. Once the GRUB 1773 I would specify a particular partition rather than the entire disk. Once the GRUB
1810 boot record has been successfully installed, you can type <c>quit</c> to quit GRUB. 1774 boot record has been successfully installed, you can type <c>quit</c> to quit GRUB.
1811 </p> 1775 </p>
1812 1776
1813 <note> The tab completion mechanism of grub can be used from within grub, 1777 <note> The tab completion mechanism of grub can be used from within grub,
1814 assuming you wrote <c> root (</c> and that you hit the TAB key, you would 1778 assuming you wrote <c> root (</c> and that you hit the TAB key, you would
1827 we get a nice GRUB boot menu when the system reboots. Here is how to do it. 1791 we get a nice GRUB boot menu when the system reboots. Here is how to do it.
1828 </p> 1792 </p>
1829 <impo>To ensure backwards compatibility with GRUB, make sure to make a link from 1793 <impo>To ensure backwards compatibility with GRUB, make sure to make a link from
1830 <i>grub.conf</i> to <i>menu.lst</i>. You can do this by doing 1794 <i>grub.conf</i> to <i>menu.lst</i>. You can do this by doing
1831 <c>ln -s /boot/grub/grub.conf /boot/grub/menu.lst </c>. </impo> 1795 <c>ln -s /boot/grub/grub.conf /boot/grub/menu.lst </c>. </impo>
1832 <p>Now, create the grub.conf file (<c>nano -w /boot/grub/grub.conf</c>), and add the following to it: 1796 <p>Now, create the grub.conf file (<c>nano -w /boot/grub/grub.conf</c>), and add the following to it:
1833 </p> 1797 </p>
1834<pre caption="Grub.conf for GRUB"> 1798<pre caption="Grub.conf for GRUB">
1835default 0 1799default 0
1836timeout 30 1800timeout 30
1837splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz 1801splashimage=(hd0,0)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
1838 1802
1839title=My example Gentoo Linux 1803title=My example Gentoo Linux
1840root (hd0,0) 1804root (hd0,0)
1841kernel (hd0,0)/boot/bzImage root=/dev/hda3 1805kernel (hd0,0)/boot/bzImage root=/dev/hda3
1842
1843<comment># Below is for setup using hardware RAID</comment>
1844title=My Gentoo Linux on RAID
1845root (hd0,0)
1846kernel (hd0,0)/boot/bzImage root=/dev/ataraid/dXpY
1847 1806
1848<comment># Below needed only for people who dual-boot</comment> 1807<comment># Below needed only for people who dual-boot</comment>
1849title=Windows XP 1808title=Windows XP
1850root (hd0,5) 1809root (hd0,5)
1851chainloader (hd0,5)+1 1810chainloader (hd0,5)+1
1852</pre> 1811</pre>
1853 <note> 1812 <note>
1854 (hd0,0) should be written without any spaces inside the parentheses. 1813 (hd0,0) should be written without any spaces inside the parentheses.
1855 </note> 1814 </note>
1856 <impo> 1815 <impo>
1857 If you set up scsi emulation for an IDE cd burner earlier, then to get it to 1816 If you set up scsi emulation for an IDE cd burner earlier, then to get it to
1858 actually work you need to add an &quot;hdx=ide-scsi&quot; fragment to the kernel 1817 actually work you need to add an &quot;hdx=ide-scsi&quot; fragment to the kernel
1859 line in grub.conf (where &quot;hdx&quot; should be the device for your cd burner). 1818 line in grub.conf (where &quot;hdx&quot; should be the device for your cd burner).
1860 </impo> 1819 </impo>
1861 <p>After saving this file, Gentoo Linux installation is complete. Selecting the first option will 1820 <p>After saving this file, Gentoo Linux installation is complete. Selecting the first option will
2064 <p>The second command above will request a new system ID and enter it into 2023 <p>The second command above will request a new system ID and enter it into
2065 <path>/etc/gentoo-stats/gentoo-stats.conf</path> automatically. You can view this file 2024 <path>/etc/gentoo-stats/gentoo-stats.conf</path> automatically. You can view this file
2066 to see additional configuration options. 2025 to see additional configuration options.
2067 </p> 2026 </p>
2068 <p>After that, the program should be run on a regular schedule 2027 <p>After that, the program should be run on a regular schedule
2069 (gentoo-stats does not have to be run as root). Add this line to your <path>crontab</path>: 2028 (gentoo-stats does not have to be run as root). Add this line to your <path>crontab</path>:
2070 </p> 2029 </p>
2071<pre caption="Updating gentoo-stats with cron"> 2030<pre caption="Updating gentoo-stats with cron">
2072<c>0 0 * * 0,4 /usr/sbin/gentoo-stats --update &gt; /dev/null</c> 2031<c>0 0 * * 0,4 /usr/sbin/gentoo-stats --update &gt; /dev/null</c>
2073</pre> 2032</pre>
2074 <p>The <c>gentoo-stats</c> program is a simple perl script which can be 2033 <p>The <c>gentoo-stats</c> program is a simple perl script which can be
2075 viewed with your favorite pager or editor: <path>/usr/sbin/gentoo-stats</path>. </p> 2034 viewed with your favorite pager or editor: <path>/usr/sbin/gentoo-stats</path>. </p>
2076 </body> 2035 </body>
2077 </section> 2036 </section>
2078 </chapter> 2037 </chapter>
2038 <chapter>
2039 <title>Gentoo On Less-Common Hardware</title>
2040 <section>
2041 <title>Hardware ATA RAID</title>
2042 <body>
2043 <p>
2044 Users who want to install Gentoo on Hardware ATA RAID must pay
2045 attention to the next steps in order for them to succesfully
2046 install Gentoo Linux:
2047 </p>
2048 <ul>
2049 <li>Be sure to start the LiveCD with the <c>doataraid</c>
2050 kerneloption.</li>
2051 <li>If you've forgotten to select <c>doataraid</c> during bootup,
2052 or the modules mysteriously didn't load, load them as needed:
2053 <pre caption = "Loading RAID modules">
2054# <i>modprobe ataraid</i>
2055<comment>For Promise Raid Controllers:</comment>
2056# <i>modprobe pdcraid</i>
2057<comment>For Highpoint Raid Controllers:</comment>
2058# <i>modprobe phtraid</i>
2059 </pre>
2060 </li>
2061 <li>Some ATA RAID Controllers require you to reboot after
2062 partitioning; formatting will otherwise fail.</li>
2063 <li>Before chrooting, mount the devicetree into the new
2064 environment:
2065 <pre caption = "Mounting /dev into /mnt/gentoo/dev">
2066# <i>mount -o bind /dev /mnt/gentoo/dev</i>
2067 </pre>
2068 </li>
2069 <li>During kernel configuration, select the required RAID options:
2070 <pre caption = "RAID in the Linux Kernel Configuration">
2071<comment>For Highpoint RAID controllers:</comment>
2072ATA/IDE/MFM/RLL support ---&gt;
2073 [*] HPT36X/37X chipset support
2074 [*] Support for IDE Raid controllers
2075 [*] Highpoint 370 software RAID
2076<comment>For Promise RAID controllers:</comment>
2077ATA/IDE/MFM/RLL support ---&gt;
2078 [*] PROMISE PDC202{46|62|65|67} support
2079 <comment>and/or</comment>
2080 [*] PROMISE PDC202{68|69|70|71|75|76|77} support
2081 [*] Support for IDE Raid controllers
2082 [*] Support Promise software RAID (Fasttrak(tm))
2083 </pre></li>
2084 <li>When using GRUB add <c>--stage2=/boot/grub/stage2</c> when
2085 running <c>grub</c> to the <c>setup</c> command:
2086 <pre caption = "Installing GRUB for Hardware RAID systems">
2087grub&gt; <i>root (hd0,0)</i>
2088grub&gt; <i>setup --stage2=/boot/grub/stage2 (hd0)</i>
2089grub&gt; <i>quit</i>
2090 </pre>
2091 Also, in the GRUB configuration be sure to point the <c>root</c>
2092 to the appropriate RAID device:
2093 <pre caption = "grub.conf for RAID">
2094title=My Gentoo Linux on RAID
2095root (hd0,0)
2096kernel (hd0,0)/boot/bzImage root=/dev/ataraid/dXpY
2097 </pre></li>
2098 <li>LILO users should set the <c>root</c> option to the
2099 appropriate RAID device:
2100 <pre caption = "lilo.conf for RAID">
2101image=/boot/bzImage
2102 label=linux
2103 read-only
2104 root=/dev/ataraid/dXpY
2105 </pre></li>
2106 </ul>
2107 </body>
2108 </section>
2109</chapter>
2079</guide> 2110</guide>

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