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Handbook for 2006.0, "Chuck Norris can divide by zero"

1 <?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
2 <!DOCTYPE sections SYSTEM "/dtd/book.dtd">
3
4 <!-- The content of this document is licensed under the CC-BY-SA license -->
5 <!-- See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 -->
6
7 <!-- $Header: /var/cvsroot/gentoo/xml/htdocs/doc/en/handbook/draft/hb-install-ppc64-kernel.xml,v 1.8 2006/02/26 18:20:29 fox2mike Exp $ -->
8
9 <sections>
10
11 <version>2.11</version>
12 <date>2006-02-27</date>
13
14 <section>
15 <title>Timezone</title>
16 <body>
17
18 <p>
19 You first need to select your timezone so that your system knows where it is
20 located. Look for your timezone in <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo</path>, then copy
21 it to <path>/etc/localtime</path>. Please avoid the
22 <path>/usr/share/zoneinfo/Etc/GMT*</path> timezones as their names do not
23 indicate the expected zones. For instance, <path>GMT-8</path> is in fact GMT+8.
24 </p>
25
26 <pre caption="Setting the timezone information">
27 # <i>ls /usr/share/zoneinfo</i>
28 <comment>(Suppose you want to use GMT)</comment>
29 # <i>cp /usr/share/zoneinfo/GMT /etc/localtime</i>
30 </pre>
31
32 </body>
33 </section>
34 <section>
35 <title>Installing the Sources</title>
36 <subsection>
37 <title>Choosing a Kernel</title>
38 <body>
39
40 <p>
41 The core around which all distributions are built is the Linux kernel.
42 It is the layer between the user programs and your system hardware.
43 Gentoo provides its users several possible kernel sources. A full
44 listing with description is available at the <uri
45 link="/doc/en/gentoo-kernel.xml">Gentoo Kernel Guide</uri>.
46 </p>
47
48 <p>
49 For PPC64 you should use <c>gentoo-sources</c>. So let's continue with
50 <c>emerge</c>'ing the kernel sources. The <c>USE="-doc"</c> is necessary to
51 avoid installing xorg-x11 or other dependencies at this point.
52 <c>USE="symlink"</c> is not necessary for a new install, but ensures proper
53 creation of the <path>/usr/src/linux</path> symlink.
54 </p>
55
56 <pre caption="Installing a kernel source">
57 # <i>USE="-doc symlink" emerge gentoo-sources</i>
58 </pre>
59
60 <p>
61 When you take a look in <path>/usr/src</path> you should see a symlink called
62 <path>linux</path> pointing to your kernel source. In this case, the installed
63 kernel source points to <c>gentoo-sources-2.6.12-r10</c>. Your version may be
64 different, so keep this in mind.
65 </p>
66
67 <pre caption="Viewing the kernel source symlink">
68 # <i>ls -l /usr/src/linux</i>
69 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 12 Oct 13 11:04 /usr/src/linux -&gt; linux-2.6.12-gentoo-r10
70 </pre>
71
72 <p>
73 Now it is time to configure and compile your kernel source. There is the
74 ability to use "genkernel" which would create a generic kernel like the
75 ones used on the installation CDs, but it is not fully functional for PPC64 at
76 the moment.
77 </p>
78
79 <p>
80 Continue now with <uri link="#manual">Manual Configuration</uri>.
81 </p>
82
83 </body>
84 </subsection>
85 </section>
86 <section id="manual">
87 <title>Manual Configuration</title>
88 <subsection>
89 <title>Introduction</title>
90 <body>
91
92 <p>
93 Manually configuring a kernel is often seen as the most difficult procedure a
94 Linux user ever has to perform. Nothing is less true -- after configuring a
95 couple of kernels you don't even remember that it was difficult ;)
96 </p>
97
98 <p>
99 However, one thing <e>is</e> true: you must know your system when you
100 configuring a kernel manually. Most information can be gathered by emerging
101 pciutils (<c>emerge pciutils</c>) which contains <c>lspci</c>. You will now
102 be able to use <c>lspci</c> within the chrooted environment. You may safely
103 ignore any <e>pcilib</e> warnings (like pcilib: cannot open
104 /sys/bus/pci/devices) that <c>lspci</c> throws out. Alternatively, you can run
105 <c>lspci</c> from a <e>non-chrooted</e> environment. The results are the same.
106 You can also run <c>lsmod</c> to see what kernel modules the Installation CD
107 uses (it might provide you with a nice hint on what to enable).
108 </p>
109
110 <pre caption="Invoking menuconfig">
111 # <i>cd /usr/src/linux</i>
112 <comment>Important: In case you are in 32-bit userland, you must edit the top
113 level Makefile in /usr/src/linux and change the CROSS_COMPILE option to
114 CROSS_COMPILE ?= powerpc64-unknown-linux-gnu-. You must do this before you run
115 make menuconfig or it may result in kernel compilation problems.</comment>
116 # <i>make menuconfig</i>
117 </pre>
118
119 <p>
120 You will be greeted with several configuration sections. We'll first
121 list some options you must activate (otherwise Gentoo will not function,
122 or not function properly without additional tweaks).
123 </p>
124
125 </body>
126 </subsection>
127 <subsection>
128 <title>Activating Required Options</title>
129 <body>
130
131 <p>
132 First of all, activate the use of development and experimental
133 code/drivers. You need this, otherwise some very important code/drivers
134 won't show up:
135 </p>
136
137 <pre caption="Selecting experimental code/drivers, General setup">
138 Code maturity level options ---&gt;
139 [*] Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
140 General setup --->
141 [*] Support for hot-pluggable devices
142 </pre>
143
144 <p>
145 Now go to <c>File Systems</c> and select support for the filesystems you use.
146 <e>Don't</e> compile them as modules, otherwise your Gentoo system will not be
147 able to mount your partitions. Also select <c>Virtual memory</c>, <c>/proc file
148 system</c>, and <c>/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs</c>:
149 </p>
150
151 <pre caption="Selecting necessary file systems">
152 File systems ---&gt;
153 [*] Virtual memory file system support (former shm fs)
154 [*] /proc file system support
155 [*] /dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs
156
157 <comment>(Select one or more of the following options as needed by your system)</comment>
158 &lt;*&gt; Reiserfs support
159 &lt;*&gt; Ext3 journalling file system support
160 &lt;*&gt; JFS filesystem support
161 &lt;*&gt; Second extended fs support
162 &lt;*&gt; XFS filesystem support
163 </pre>
164
165 <note>
166 You will find some of the mentioned options under <c>Pseudo
167 filesystems</c> which is a subpart of <c>File systems</c>.
168 </note>
169
170 <p>
171 If you are using PPPoE to connect to the Internet or you are using a
172 dial-up modem, you will need the following options in the kernel (you
173 will find the mentioned options under <c>Networking support</c> which is
174 a subpart of <c>Device Drivers</c>):
175 </p>
176
177 <pre caption="Selecting PPPoE necessary drivers">
178 Network device support ---&gt;
179 &lt;*&gt; PPP (point-to-point protocol) support
180 &lt;*&gt; PPP support for async serial ports
181 &lt;*&gt; PPP support for sync tty ports
182 </pre>
183
184 <p>
185 The two compression options won't harm but are not definitely needed, neither
186 does the <c>PPP over Ethernet</c> option, that might only be used by
187 <c>rp-pppoe</c> when configured to do kernel mode PPPoE.
188 </p>
189
190 <p>
191 If you require it, don't forget to include support in the kernel for your
192 ethernet card.
193 </p>
194
195 <p>
196 Disable ADB raw keycodes:
197 </p>
198
199 <pre caption="Disabling ADB raw keycodes">
200 Macintosh Device Drivers ---&gt;
201 [ ] Support for ADB raw keycodes
202 </pre>
203
204 <p>
205 When you're done configuring your kernel, continue with <uri
206 link="#compiling">Compiling and Installing</uri>.
207 </p>
208
209 </body>
210 </subsection>
211 <subsection id="compiling">
212 <title>Compiling and Installing</title>
213 <body>
214
215 <p>
216 Now that your kernel is configured, it is time to compile and install it. Exit
217 the configuration and start the compilation process:
218 </p>
219
220 <pre caption="Compiling the kernel">
221 (Apple/IBM) # <i>make &amp;&amp; make modules_install</i>
222 </pre>
223
224 <p>
225 When the kernel has finished compiling, copy the kernel image to
226 <path>/boot</path>. Remember to replace <path>&lt;kernel-version&lt;</path>
227 with your actual kernel version:
228 </p>
229
230 <pre caption="Installing the kernel">
231 (Apple/IBM) # <i>cp vmlinux /boot/&lt;kernel-version&gt;</i>
232 </pre>
233
234 <p>
235 Now continue with <uri link="#kernel_modules">Configuring the Modules</uri>.
236 </p>
237
238 </body>
239 </subsection>
240 </section>
241 <section id="kernel_modules">
242 <title>Configuring the Modules</title>
243 <body>
244
245 <p>
246 You should list the modules you want automatically loaded in
247 <path>/etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6</path>. You can add extra
248 options to the modules too if you want.
249 </p>
250
251 <p>
252 To view all available modules, run the following <c>find</c> command. Don't
253 forget to substitute "&lt;kernel version&gt;" with the version of the kernel you
254 just compiled:
255 </p>
256
257 <pre caption="Viewing all available modules">
258 # <i>find /lib/modules/&lt;kernel version&gt;/ -type f -iname '*.o' -or -iname '*.ko'</i>
259 </pre>
260
261 <p>
262 For instance, to automatically load the <c>3c59x.o</c> module, edit the
263 <path>kernel-2.6</path> file and enter the module name in it.
264 </p>
265
266 <pre caption="Editing /etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6">
267 # <i>nano -w /etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6</i>
268 </pre>
269
270 <pre caption="/etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6">
271 3c59x
272 </pre>
273
274 <p>
275 Continue the installation with <uri link="?part=1&amp;chap=8">Configuring
276 your System</uri>.
277 </p>
278
279 </body>
280 </section>
281 </sections>

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